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Customer Service at Airports: Who is the Customer? What is Service?. Ron Kuhlmann Vice President Unisys Transportation 5 March 2006 Abu Dhabi. Agenda. Historical Perspective How do we define Customers? How do they define Service?

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Customer service at airports who is the customer what is service l.jpg

Customer Service at Airports:Who is the Customer?What is Service?

Ron Kuhlmann

Vice President

Unisys Transportation

5 March 2006

Abu Dhabi


Agenda l.jpg
Agenda

  • Historical Perspective

  • How do we define Customers?

  • How do they define Service?

  • How do airports provide (defined) service to (identified) customers?

  • Where do we go from here?


Airports began as rail stations l.jpg
Airports began as rail stations.

  • Rail transport was the only point of reference

  • Seen as a municipal service

  • Potential was unclear

  • Community pride was involved


Airlines not airports were the deal l.jpg
Airlines, not airports, were the deal

  • Airports were functional

  • Points of embarkation and debarkation

  • They became expressions of the carrier image

  • They were locally funded


In a regulated to about 1980 environment airports l.jpg
In a regulated (to about 1980) environment airports:

  • knew their operators and routes

  • had clearly defined markets and potential

  • were vehicles for particular brand identification

  • had few surprises

  • were viewed as utilities


Deregulation changed things l.jpg
Deregulation changed things

  • Massive hub and spoke systems emerged

  • Airports fell into clear categories

  • Spending at hubs was directed to the hub carrier

  • Spoke cities saw dramatic schedule increases to multiple hubs

  • Airlines drove growth


And then l.jpg
And then…?

  • New entrants undermined legacy carriers

  • Internet bookings gave customers complete price transparency

  • Reduced yields increased the importance of cost control

  • 9/1, followed by SARS, realigned the players

  • Cost control included all operational aspects


Suddenly l.jpg
Suddenly:

  • Airports needed to be much more cost efficient

  • Airports saw major shifts in constituents

  • Airports needed to aggressively market themselves

  • Airports found that they, not their airlines, needed to be competitive

  • Security became the prime passenger activity


Which brings us to today l.jpg
Which brings us to today

  • Functions previously performed enroute have move to the airport

  • Functions previously done at the airport have moved off-site

  • Cost competitiveness has become a fixed goal

  • Non-aviation revenues are ever more important

  • Supported utility status has been replaced by need for sustained profitability


Slide10 l.jpg

Discussion?

2006

Who knows what we’ll do in Dubai.


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