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Support Center for Child Advocates. Long-Range Plan 2008 to 2012 Board Retreat January 12, 2008. Long-Range Plan Contents. 1. Section 1: Agenda and Opening Expectations for Long-Range Plan (2008 to 2012) and ‘Good to Great’ Framework

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Support Center for Child Advocates

Long-Range Plan

2008 to 2012

Board Retreat

January 12, 2008


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Long-Range Plan

Contents

1. Section 1: Agenda and Opening

Expectations for Long-Range Plan (2008 to 2012) and

‘Good to Great’ Framework

Objectives for Retreat

2. Long Range Plan 2000 vs. 2007 - Status

3. Brutal Facts of the External Environment

4. SCCA Hedgehog and Brutal Facts of Direct Representation

5. Brutal Facts of SCCA Policy Work

6. Brutal Facts of SCCA Resource Engine

7. Summary of Recommendations and Implications


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Len Bernstein

Frank Cervone

Margie Gualtieri

Mary Ann Hearn

Chris Kenty

Paul Kupferschmidt

Beth Reeves

Jodi Schatz

Cassie Solomon

Mark Stewart

Diane Sullivan

Tina Wright

The Team


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Expectations for Long-Range Plan

  • Develop plan that is realistic and operational

  • Ensure Plan has Strategies, Objectives, Measures, Tactics with Milestones and Timing

  • Review the Plan regularly, e.g., milestones reported on by SCCA Directors and Board


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The Good to Great Framework

  • Hedgehog

  • Brutal Facts

  • Resource Engine

  • Right People on the Bus


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Good To Great studied the characteristics of companies that were able to DRAMATICALLY improve their performance.

What did they have in common?

Good-to-Great Cases

Inflection Point

What principles explain the difference?

Good, not Great

Good, not Great

Comparison Cases

Matched-Pair Selection

(Comparable cases at the moment of inflection)


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What is a “hedgehog?”

  • The essence of the “hedgehog concept” is a deep understanding of three things:

    • What are you deeply passionate about?

    • What can you be the best in the world at?

    • What best drives your economic or resource engine?

      A resource engine has three components:

      time, money and brand


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Disciplined Thought: Why confront the brutal facts?

  • Confront the brutal facts: The Stockdale Paradox. Retain unwavering faith that you can and will prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulties, and at the same time have the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be.

  • This process relies heavily on data to learn what is working for SCCA now and what needs to happen next.


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What do we mean by great results?

  • It doesn’t really matter whether you can quantify your results. What matters is that you rigorously assemble evidence—quantitative or qualitative—to track your progress.

  • One outcome of this process is a set of metrics that SCCA can use to measure progress against the plan.

Hold yourself accountable for making progress in outputs, even if those outputs defy easy measurement.


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The Good to Great Framework

The critical distinction is not between business and the social (sectors) but between great and good. We need to reject the naïve imposition of the “language of business” on the social sectors, and instead jointly embrace a language of greatness.

— Jim Collins


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Strategy Implementation

Years 3-52011-2013

  • Build Capacity

  • Years 1-2

  • Build SCCA capacity

    • Infrastructure

    • Board structure

    • HR Practices

    • Marketing and visibility

Devote planning years one and two (FY2009 and FY2010) to institutional capacity building



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2000 Strategies

Expand the number of children it serves (630) to make maximum use of its experience and skills in Philadelphia.

Hire an Associate Director to strengthen its internal organizational and focus on management issues.

Expand its activities in areas other than direct services to client children.

2007 Status

Record high of 796 in 2007

First Associate Director recruited and hired resulting in resolution of many issues

Created Intake Attorney/Volunteer Coordinator position resulting in significant training accomplishments; it is critical to the hedgehog and has not become a revenue generators as envisioned.

2000 vs. 2007 Status


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2000 Strategies

4. Subsequent to the development of the internal structure of the organization, make SCCA skills and experience available to interested outside parties, particularly insofar as they can be generalized and applied to child welfare systems outside of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania.

5. Develop a strategy to make SCCA specific role better known in the Philadelphia and Pennsylvania legal communities and the community at large.

2007 Status

Executive Director and Managing Attorney participated in activities in the ABA and consulted on the development of programs in three cities and established organization as leaders.

As was intended in the plan, the SCCA is well-known in the community. Executive Director and staff members were consistently sought for consultation and publications.

2000 vs. 2007 Status


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2000 Strategies

6. Pursue financial support from local and national funders to support both the increase in SCCA representation of children as well as its expansion into training and consultation.

2007 Status

Federal VOCA funding has decreased by 30% over the plan period.

Agency revenue rose from $840K in 2000 to $1.78m in 2007.

The costs of representing one child increased from approximately $1,670 in 2000 to $2,400 in 2007.

2000 vs. 2007 Status



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Risk Factors in Child Well-Being

Brutal Facts of the Environment


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Key Risk-Factors to a Child’s Well-Being

  • Living in poverty

  • Living in a single-parent household

  • Being a high school dropout

  • Having difficulty speaking English

  • Living in a high-poverty neighborhood

    www.aecf.org


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How Pennsylvania Measures Up

  • 14.7% of children live in poverty

  • 23% of children live in single-parent households

  • 17.1% of 16-19 year olds are high school dropouts

  • 2.9% have difficulty speaking English

  • 15.3% live in high-poverty neighborhoods

    www.aecf.org


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How Philadelphia Measures Up

  • 28.5% of Philadelphia’s children live in poverty

  • 25.9% high school drop out rate

  • 6,728 children are in dependency placements; 1,797 are in delinquency placements

    www.philasafesound.org


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Brutal Facts of Children & Crime in Philadelphia

  • 4,433 children and young adults were victims of crime; ¾ of these crimes were violent (rape, homicide, assault, robbery)

  • In 2005, there were 920 gunshot victims between the ages of 7-24

  • In 2005, the number of assaults in public schools went up for the eighth straight year

  • 2,258 youths were arrested for drug related offenses

    www.philasafesound.org


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Education

Brutal Facts of the Environment


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Education in Pennsylvania

  • 31% of fourth graders score below basic reading level (ranked 14th of the 50 states)

  • 23% of eight graders score below basic reading level (23/50)

  • 46% of children live in homes without internet access (52% nationally)

  • 5% of teens are high school drop outs (8% nationally)

    www.aecf.org


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High School Drop Out in Phila.

  • 50% achieve on-time graduation 2000-05

    • 40% who do not transfer will drop out

  • 8,000 middle & high school students drop out

  • 5,000 attend less than 50%

  • 30,000 youth out-of-school each day (3 of 8)

  • 68% of pregnant girls dropped out

    • More likely early in high school

      www.pyninc.org


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Education: Risks for Children Charged as Delinquents

  • Experience unaddressed health, mental health, and learning problems

  • Suspended or expelled even if charges are dismissed

  • Not permitted to return or re-enroll in home school

  • Re-arrested if not in school

  • Do not receive adequate education while incarcerated

    www.pewreportfostercare.org


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Hazard of Drop-Out www.pyninc.org


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Agency Youth www.pyninc.org


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Immigration and Children

Brutal Facts of the Environment


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Immigration in Pennsylvania

  • 4.1% of Pennsylvania’s population is foreign born

  • Children of immigrants are the fastest growing segment of the child population nationwide

    www.futureofchildren.org


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Children of Immigrants

  • More likely to be experience at least one of five key risk factors

  • 54% live in families with incomes of less than twice federal poverty level

  • Less likely to receive food stamps, cash welfare, housing assistance

  • Only 62% of 19 year olds with parents of South and Central American descent have graduated high school

  • Nationwide, 26% live in linguistically isolated households

    www.urban.org

    www.futureofchildren.org


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Foster Care & Juvenile Justice

Brutal Facts of the Environment


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Foster Care

  • In 2003, 523,062 children in America were living in foster care

  • 21,768 of Pennsylvania’s children were living in foster care

  • Fifth highest number nationwide!

  • Foster children have to move to an average of three different placements during their time in the system

    www.pewreportfostercare.org


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Foster Care in Pennsylvania

Compared with national average:

  • 7.5/1000 children are in foster care (v. 7.2)

  • 0.35% are maltreated in foster care (v. 0.49%)

  • 23.5% re-enter foster care (v. 11.40%)

  • 70.1% are reunited with their parent or caregiver within 12 months (v. 69.12%)

  • 16.8% are adopted within 12 months (v. 21.08%)

    www.firststar.org


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Racial Inequity and Foster Care

  • Children in foster care are disproportionately children of color; 33% of nationwide population, but 55% of children in foster care system www.cwla.org

  • Children of color are more likely to stay in foster care longer and leave at a slower rate; 61% of children waiting to be adopted are children of color

  • Far less likely to reunite with their families

    www.pewreportfostercare.org


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Mental Disability and Foster Care

  • 30-40% of children in the foster care system should receive special education

  • Because of frequent moves these needs often go unmet or unidentified because special education depends on careful tracking and parental involvement to work successfully

    Smith, JM. “Foster Care Children with Disabilities” Journal of Health and Social Policy: 2002


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Challenges for Children in Foster Care: Emotional

  • Most do not know whether they will rejoin their families or become part of a new, permanent family

  • Some blame themselves because they do not understand why they were removed from their birthparents

  • As adults, they are more likely to experience homelessness, unemployment, and other problems

    www.pewreportfostercare.org


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Challenges for Children in Foster Care: Education

  • Numerous school placements by age 18

  • Loss of academic progress with each move

  • Higher rates of grade retention

  • Lower scores on standardized tests

  • Higher absenteeism, tardiness, truancy, and dropout rates

  • 2x as likely to drop out

  • High rates of out of school suspension leading to increased juvenile detention

    www.pewreportfostercare.org


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Profile of Children after One Year in Foster Care

  • 45% African-American; 31% white; 17% Hispanic; 7% other

  • Neglect was primary reason (60%) for placement; 41% had experienced more than one of the four main categories of maltreatment: physical abuse, sexual abuse, failure to supervise, failure to provide

  • Average age of children: In traditional foster care: 6; In kinship care: 7; in group care: 10

    www.ndacan.cornell.edu


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Kinship Care

Brutal Facts of the Environment


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Kinship Care

  • In Pennsylvania, kinship care is defined as a child living with “someone related in the first, second, or third degree to the parent or stepparent of that child who may be related through blood or marriage and who is at least 21 years of age”

  • 16.6% of PA’s children live in formal or informal kinship care

    www.casey.org


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Kinship Care is a Rising Trend

  • Number of available foster care placements has not kept apace of the rise in children needing out of home placements

  • Child welfare agencies taking a more positive view of kinship care

  • Federal and state court rulings recognizing the right of relatives to act as foster parents and be financially compensated accordingly

    www.casey.org


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Characteristics of Kinship-Care Givers

  • Most caregivers are older than 60 and unmarried; majority are grandparents

  • 2/5 have incomes below the poverty level

  • Most take on responsibility during a crisis period

  • Encounter serious financial difficulties because of need for housing, medical services, schooling etc.

    www.casey.org


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Characteristics of Children living in Kinship Care: Emotional

  • Tend to move fewer times than others in out-of-home placements; Have more contact with siblings and birth parents; Have higher self-esteem

  • However, also tend to have more intense and higher rates of emotional and behavioral problems than the general child population

  • Higher rate of intra-uterine drug and alcohol exposure

  • Lack access to medical and emotional health care

    www.casey.org


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Children with Disabilities Emotional

Brutal Facts of the Environment


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Children with Disabilities Emotional

  • 4.6% of non-institutionalized children in Pennsylvania have one disability

  • 3.7% of these children have a mental disability

  • 1.1% of Pennsylvania’s children have more than one disability

    www.aecf.org


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Risks for Children with Disabilities Emotional

  • More likely to suffer sexual, physical, emotional abuse and physical neglect

  • Children with a disability are 3.4 times more likely to suffer maltreatment at home

  • Runaways are disproportionately likely to have a mental disability

  • 90% of youth who commit suicide have at least one major psychiatric disorder

    Sullivan, P.M. Knutson, J.F. “The Prevalence of Disabilities and Maltreatment Among Runaway Children” Child Abuse and Neglect: 2000.


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Aging-Out Youth Emotional

Brutal Facts of the Environment


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Youth Aging Out of Foster Care Emotional

  • Often do not have adequate education to successfully transition

  • Finding housing and paying for healthcare are particularly problematic

    www.jlc.org


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Environmental Factors affecting SCCA Delivery of Service Emotional

  • Demographic Changes

    • Nationalities/Race

    • Religious Beliefs

    • Languages

    • Increase in Single Parent Households

  • Medical Issues

    • Increase in Diseases/Conditions, e.g., HIV, STDs, Diabetes

  • Legal Issues

    • Sexual Orientation – Adoption, Gay/Lesbian Foster Care

    • Immigration


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PA Youth and Risky Behavior Emotional

  • 11.7% had attacked someone with the intent to harm

  • 2.1% attempted to steal a vehicle

  • 5.1% reported being arrested

  • 9.6% reported being suspended

  • 5.5% reported selling drugs

  • 2.4% reported bringing a weapon to school

  • 7.0% reported belonging to a gang with a name

    www.pccd.state.pa.us


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Child Well-Being in Philadelphia Emotional

  • PHILADELPHIA IS 4TH HIGHEST RISK COUNTY IN PA.

  • “Whole child” court reviews need at least 30 minutes of court time … but Block Schedule provides 15 minutes per family of children

  • Child well-being representation have not yet taken shape in PA or US

  • [SafeSound facts]


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SCCA on Child Well-Being Emotional

  • Three-year Fellowship on Child Well-Being to shape attorney practice

  • Volunteer Training Workshop supports multidisciplinary child advocacy

  • Outcomes in Behavioral Health Project targeting caregivers

  • NCLN Policy Campaign In School, Right School, Finish School


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Risks for High School Drop-Outs Emotional

School dropouts are more likely to:

  • Be unemployed

  • Experience higher levels of early pregnancy

  • Experience substance abuse

  • Require more social services

    www.pewreportfostercare.org


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Child Abuse and Neglect -- 2006 Emotional

  • 23,181 reports of suspected child & student abuse received, an increase of 327 reports from 2005

  • 4,152 reports of suspected child and student abuse were substantiated, 238 fewer than in 2005.

  • 18 percent of reports of child abuse substantiated, one percent less than in 2005.

  • Sexual abuse was involved in 59 percent of all substantiated reports, down one percent from 2005.

    www.dpw.state.pa.us


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SCCA on Immigrant Children Emotional

  • Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS) is ONLY vehicle for most children to achieve visa

  • SCCA and HIAS collaborate on direct rep.

  • SCCA convenes Immigrant Children Workgroup

  • 2-year Equal Justice Fellowship ends 8/08


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SCCA on Foster Care Emotional

  • SCCA outcomes-based representation unique in nation

  • Client Advisory Board advices SCCA on child experiences

  • Court reform initiatives target improved Dependency Court practice

  • Wm Penn Foundation supports leadership work for court reform


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SCCA on Aging-Out Youth Emotional

  • SCCA participated in development & training on O Court Protocol

  • [need some stats and info on aging out youth]

  • Wm Penn Foundation supports leadership work for older youth


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SCCA on Kinship Care Emotional

  • Leadership since 1989

  • DHS funds Kids ‘n Kin Project collaboration with PSSC

  • appointments & child needs in Domestic Relations custody cases … floodgate!

  • Increasing kinship issues in Dependency Court


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SCCA on Children with Disabilities Emotional

  • Medically Needy Children Project …

  • SCCA Golf Classic …


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Physical and Emotional Well-Being Emotional

  • 90% were insured by Medicare and had adequate immunizations and dental care

  • However, these children fell below national samples on every measure of cognitive and social development

  • 25-50% of those 2 years and older had behavioral problems v. 17% nationally

  • 40% had social skills categorized as low v. 16% nationally

  • Over 50% of 11-17 had committed a delinquent act

  • Those children who had been sexually abused, were living in a group home, or who were older than 7 were most at risk

    www.nadacn.cornell.edu


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Youth in the Juvenile Justice System Emotional

  • Have substance abuse/dependency rates 2x that of the general population

  • 50-75% have a diagnosable mental health problem; less than 1/3 have been diagnosed when incarcerated

  • 4x the suicide rate of the general population

  • 92% of young women report being emotionally, physically, or mentally abused at some point in their lives

    www.promotementalhealth.org


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Sources Emotional

  • Annie E. Casey Foundation: Kids Count 2006 www.aecf.org

  • Child Abuse and Neglect State Profiles www.firststar.org

  • Children of Immigrants: Facts and Figures May 2006 www.urban.org

  • Children of Immigrant Families www.futureofchildren.org

  • Dependent Youth Aging Out of Foster Care in Pennsylvania www.jlc.org


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Sources Emotional

  • DPW Child Abuse Report 2006 www.dpw.state.pa.us

  • Foster Care: Voices from the Inside www.pewfostercare.org

  • Kinship Report: Assessing the Needs of Relative Caregivers and the Children in their Care, 2003. Casey Family Programs www.casey.org

  • National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, Wave 1 www.ndacan.cornell.edu

  • National Data and Analysis System: Children of Color in the Welfare System www.cwla.org


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Sources Emotional

  • Center for the Promotion of Mental Health in the Juvenile Justice www.promotementalhealth.org

  • Smith, JM. “Foster Care Children with Disabilities” Journal of Health and Social Policy: 2002

  • Sullivan, P.M. Knutson, J.F. “The Prevalence of Disabilities and Maltreatment Among Runaway Children” Child Abuse and Neglect: 2000.

  • Supporting Justice: A Report on the Pro Bono Work of America’s Lawyers www.abanet.org

  • U.S. Census Bureau www.census.gov


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Sources Emotional

  • 2005 Pennsylvania Youth Survey (PAYS) www.pccd.state.pa.us

  • Report Card 2006: The Well-Being of Children in Philadelphia www.philasafesound.org

  • Unfulfilled Promises: The Dimensions and Characteristics of Philadelphia's Drop-out Crisis, 2000-2005 (Philadelphia Youth Network 2006) www.pyninc.org



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The SCCA Hedgehog Emotional

Teaming dedicated and competent volunteer lawyers with experienced child advocate social workers and staff attorney consultants to provide legal and social work services to child victims of abuse and neglect through a “whole child” representation model

Experienced child advocate staff social worker

Dedicated and competent volunteer lawyer

Experienced child advocate staff attorney consultant

CHILD

Change the Story

Policy Work



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2009 Emotional

2012

2008

2010

2011

The Strategy

Direct Representation

Policy Work

Resource Engine

Out of Scope: Geographic Spread Strategies in which SCCA would replicate model.




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Sources of SCCA Appointments Emotional

Private lawyers (approx. 100) appointed new 3114 cases

SCCA appointed 250 new cases

Penn Legal Clinic appointed 23 new cases.* When law semester ends, cases move to SCCA

Juvenile Law Center appointed 3 cases

Department of Health and Human Services

files 8700 dependent

petitions per year

Dependent Court Operations appoints Child Advocacy Unit (CAU) of Defender Association

CAU conflicts out of 3400 cases

DA (or Judge) determines whether SCCA should be appointed (often without SCCA knowing it)

Criminal court/DA prosecutes unknown number of caregivers for crimes against children

SCCA appointed 71 new cases

Domestic Relations Judge

Appoints SCCA and PSSC refers case

Domestic Relations Branch/PSSC interacts with approximately 10,000 children

SCCA appointed 32 new cases

SCCA initiates dependency proceedings

Walk-in/other referral

SCCA appointed 5 to 10 new cases


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Brutal Fact #1: Emotional There are 8700 new dependant cases in Philadelphia every yearBrutal Fact #2: SCCA is appointed 250 new cases per year; 3114 dependent cases are available to come to SCCA

Department of Health and Human Services

files 8700 dependent

petitions per year

Private lawyers (approx. 100) appointed new 3114 cases

SCCA appointed 250 new cases

Penn Legal Clinic appointed 23 new cases.* When law semester ends, cases move to SCCA

Juvenile Law Center appointed 3 cases

Dependent Court Operations appoints Child Advocacy Unit (CAU) of Defender Association

CAU conflicts out of 3400 cases


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Brutal Fact #3: Emotional SCCA is virtually the only provider for crimes against children cases in Philadelphia SCCA is appointed 71 new cases per year and has no criminal case intakeCriminal cases are more difficult and SCCA has the least control, however they fit the SCCA hedgehog and these children need SCCA badly

Criminal court/DA prosecutes unknown number of caregivers for crimes against children

DA (or Judge) determines whether SCCA should be appointed (often without SCCA knowing it)

SCCA appointed 71 new cases


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Domestic Relations Judge Emotional

Appoints SCCA and PSSC refers case

Domestic Relations Branch/PSSC interacts with approximately 10,000 children

SCCA appointed 32 new cases

Brutal Fact #4: In 2006/2007, SCCA served 40 domestic relations (PSSC) children; cases which do not fit the SCCA hedgehog modelbecause they do not predominantly use SCCA social workers; they do use SCCA staff and volunteer attorneys


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Brutal Fact #5: Emotional SCCA must raise approximately $2000 per child per year or $1.6 million per year for current caseload of 800

SCCA spends: $2400 per child per year ($1.6m)

Government pays: $ 400 per child per year

Gap: $2000 per child per year



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300 Emotional

800

500

+

Continue

New

Brutal Fact #6: On average, SCCA manages a total of 800 cases. Each year, 300 cases continue and 500 new cases are added.


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SCCA Caseload by Ethnicity Emotional

Brutal Fact #7: Philadelphia population is 44% African American but 68% of SCCA cases. On a positive note, SCCA has improved capturing ethnicity at intake.


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Staffing: SCCA Emotional Organization


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BOARD OF DIRECTORS Emotional

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Executive Director

F Cervone

Executive Director

F Cervone

Assoc Dir

P Kupferschmidt

SW Suprvr

T Wright

SW Suprv

(Vacant)

Mgng Attrny

M Gualtieri

Intake/Vol Coord

J Schatz

Res/Eval

C Kenty

Dir Dev/PR

Maryann Hearn

SWs

1. TBD

2. TBD

3. TBD

4. TBD

Network Mgr

B McHale

SWs

AB Clarke

D Conner

C Palmer

S Smith

M Walley

D Wagner

Dev Officers

L Pangborn

(Vacant)

Dev Officers

L Pangborn

(Vacant)

Staff Attryns

C T-Dougherty

I J-Baptiste

B Kassel

R West

Accountant

X Chen

Dev Asst

L Watson

Front Desk Adm

M Browne

Dev Contractor

M Viggiano

OBH Project

A Modica

Custodian

D Matkins

Case Handler

Non-Case Handler

Supports Case Handlers

Administrative Team

Brutal Fact #8: 50% of SCCA staff are case handlers. Of 27 employees, 14 are and 13 are not case handlers


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SCCA Roles and Responsibilities Emotional

Executive Director: CEO, with responsibility for fiscal, program, personnel, administration, legal, contract and grant compliance, and external relations. Reports/liaisons/meets with BOD. Perform other duties/projects related to mgmt of Child Advocates as required.

Managing Attorney: Responsible for legal mgmt of cases. Develop legal positions on key issues in direct representation & appellate practice & oversee their implementation by volunteers & staff. Sprv staff attorneys & consult with staff SWs. Conduct interviews, ee performance reviews, training & new-hire orientation.Serve as liaison with outside agencies, participating in committee work to improve the Philadelphia child welfare community. Assist the agency in maintaining a national presence in the children’s rights arena. Serve as member of the Admin Team.

SW Supervisor: Supervise Assist SW Sprvr and SW staff in their case mgmt & other activities. Have a good working knowledge of the fundamentals of child welfare, legal system, community resources and the ability to interface with such outside agencies, organizations, and legal entities on behalf of staff and clients. Conduct interviews, ee performance reviews, training & new-hire orientation. Serve as member of the Admin Team.

Staff Attorney: Provides direct legal representation, case management and other related legal tasks to abused and neglected children in Court proceedings.

Case Handler

Non-Case Handler

Supports Case Handlers


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SCCA Roles and Responsibilities Emotional

Assoc SW Supervisor: Reports to & assists SW Supervisor. Supervise 3 to 4 SW staff with case mgmt & other activities. Good working knowledge of fundamentals of child welfare, legal system, community resources & the ability to interface with outside agencies, organizations, & legal entities on behalf of staff/clients. Conduct intrvs, ee performance reviews, trng & new-hire orientation. Participate with the admin team as requested.

Social Worker: To provide direct service as a team member with volunteer attorneys to represent children in dependency and criminal court proceedings and agency policies.

OBH Project: Serve as Project Director for the Outcomes in Behavioral Health Project. Develop & present curriculum increasing awareness of the need for & content of treatment programs that address child victimization, trauma & recovery, & ways to improve & facilitate interagency planning personnel cooperation. Work with & assist SW Supervisor in supervision of staff Child Advocate SWs, with emphasis on access to behavioral health services for client children. Good working knowledge of the fundamentals of child welfare, legal system, community resources & ability to interface with outside agencies, organizations, & legal entities

Dir, Development/PR: Responsible for strategy & implementation of the agency’s development & PR efforts, incldg major gifts, corporate & foundation appeals, special events, planned giving, & direct mail. The Director supervises the agency’s Dev staff & is the key contact for BOD & Dev Committee members on matters related to development.

Case Handler

Non-Case Handler

Supports Case Handlers


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SCCA Roles and Responsibilities Emotional

Development Officer: Fundraising with an emphasis on meeting revenue goals and building significant unrestricted funding from corporate and law firm sources, including contributions and sponsorships, corporate employee committee-directed contributions and SCCA events. This position provides a full-range of support svcs associated with SCCA’s Corporate/Law Firm portfolio to the Director of Development and the Dev Team.

Development Asst: Provide support services to the Development Director & Dev Team as needed, incldg: entering gifts into RE db, generation of reports and thank you letters from RE, management of mass mailings to constituencies, preparation of documents and reports for Board and Com Mtgs, maintenance of Foundation and Corp files, maintenance of materials needed for proposals, preparation of correspondence to foundations and other donors.

Network Manager: Daily operation of a local area network comprised of 6 servers - Domain Controller, Alternate Domain controller, SQL Server, Exchange server, Exchange front end, Novell Server (Novell and NT) and 38 workstations. System hardware maintenance and monitoring, including implementing and monitoring network policies / procedures, initial and ongoing diagnostics, parts ordering and machine repair. Long term planning for both software and hardware. Administration and maintenance coordination of in-house telephone system.

Accountant: Monitor and input data relevant to cash receipts, cash disbursements and payroll to generate monthly financial statements. Tracking of employee time-off schedules, benefits, medical, life and disability insurance policies.

Case Handler

Non-Case Handler

Supports Case Handlers


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SCCA Roles and Responsibilities Emotional

Front Desk Admin: Provide a full range of secretarial and information management support functions for the Agency.

Custodian: Provide a full range of in-depth cleaning services to SCCA office building.

Assoc Director: Manage admin office Ops, communications, HR, bldg mgmt, and resource mgmt/allocation. Provide guidance, decision-making support & supervision to mgmt team w/regard to, resources, finances, etc. Manage staff mtgs/admin team mtgs. Act on behalf of the Exe Dir as required. Serve on Ad Hoc BOD Committees.

Volunteer Coord & Intake Attorney: Maintain cadre of trained volunteer attorneys and paralegals sufficient to serve the client children of the agency. Serve as agency person with primary responsibility for recruiting, training and supporting volunteers. Receive and process all new cases. Assign cases to staff member/volunteer attorney team. Serve as member of the Admin Team.

Dir, Research & Evaluation: Combination of research, data management and general admin. Conduct program evaluations of discreet projects and prepare results. Assist staff in computer learning & designing client info data systems. Generate client & volunteer attorney data for agency reports & proposals. Assist the development staff in database work. Serve as member of the Admin Team.

Case Handler

Non-Case Handler

Supports Case Handlers



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Brutal Fact #9: Emotional SCCA doubled the number of new cases in 2007 vs. 2002…


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Brutal Fact #9a: Emotional …without increasing case handling staff



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Activity Tracking Study: AttorneysApril to June 2007

Calculation Method

  • Counted court hearings, home visits, agency meetings, case openings and closings

  • Estimated and added up, via Time Estimate Key, each counted activity

  • Added in

    • Scheduled SCCA administrative block

    • Staff attorney block, combination of scheduled and estimated for attorneys only

  • Calculated

    • Total scheduled time

    • Total remaining unscheduled time/client for all other case and agency activities

  • Assembled information from “Schedule” emails sent by staff, plus Next Court Date calendar. Significant tendency to undercount.


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    Educated Guess based upon AttorneysTime Estimate Key

    • 4.0 hours: Dependency Court, including paperwork

    • 2.5 hours: Home visit

    • 3.5 hours: Per family on opening a case, including meeting with volunteer attorney

    • 3.5 hours: Per family, closing a case

    • All the other case and SCCA activities (unscheduled)

      • Acquiring records

      • Training and consulting with volunteers

      • Developing relationship with clients outside of court or home visits

      • Reacting to emergencies

      • Ensuring that health, educational, safety needs are met

      • Paperwork and filing

      • Peer support, etc……..


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    To determine what Social Worker caseload should be it is necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled block of activities.


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    Brutal Fact #10: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled Social Workers were left with 32 minutes per child per month for the whole range of unscheduled activities.


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    Brutal Fact #11: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled Staff attorneys were left with 43 minutes per child per month for the whole range of unscheduled activities*

    *Removing one new law fellow from the average leaves staff attorneys 43 vs. 64


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    Brutal Fact #12: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled allowing 1.5 hours per child per month for unscheduled activities


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    Brutal Fact #12a: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled allowing 2 hours per child per month for unscheduled activities


    Brutal fact 12b allowing 2 5 hours per client per month for unscheduled activities l.jpg
    Brutal Fact #12b: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled allowing 2.5 hours per client per month for unscheduled activities


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    Brutal Fact #13: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled SCCA target for hedgehog is 50 children per social worker; 25 per staff attorney (50% of social worker caseload)*

    * As of January 2008, on average target is 65 children per

    social worker


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    Brutal Fact #14: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled Social Worker caseload has been well above hedgehog target of 50 children

    • Target is 70 children per social worker which will be achieved by December 31, 2007 through:

      • Protocols established in June forced case closings immediately after court closing, which increased pressure of new case openings.

      • Impact of case openings and closings on workload not yet considered.

    • In 2007, SCCA opened 146 more new cases than in 2006. Within 4 months of June start,

      • Each social worker served an average of 88 children/40 families

      • One social worker served 101 cases


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    Brutal Fact #15: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled Child Advocates relies on volunteer attorneys to provide legal representation to its clients.

    • Child Advocates has trained over 3000 attorneys.

    • Each FY, Child Advocates has approximately 340 volunteer attorneys with child clients.

    • Volunteer attorneys spend 2 – 10 hours per month Child Advocates’ cases.

    • Each case lasts 2 – 3 years on average.


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    Brutal Fact #16: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled Volunteer recruitment, training and nurturing is a full time endeavor.

    Recruit

    Train

    Nurture Through Case

    Retain for New Case


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    Brutal Fact #17: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled Volunteer attorneys do not always consider their pro bono cases priorities and Staff Attorneys are often called upon to cover cases in court when volunteers are not available.

    • This is evidenced by attorneys not attending court hearings, home visits, Family Service Plan meetings and the like.

    • Child Advocates Staff Attorneys cover for volunteer attorneys in 10% of all court hearings.

    • During a five month period in 2007, Staff Attorneys covered 64 of 637 hearings.


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    Brutal Fact #18: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled The collaboration between volunteers attorneys and staff social workers can be difficult because of status differential and perceived ownership of cases.

    • More training is need for social workers to work with attorneys and volunteers.

    • Some attorneys are hierarchical and treat social workers as their assistants rather than as team members.


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    Brutal Fact #19: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled Volunteer attorneys need regular and ongoing training and Child Advocates has no mechanism and no dedicated staff for ongoing training and on-going training is not a priority for volunteer attorneys.

    • Volunteers need periodic updates on the law, procedural changes and service innovations.

    • Trainings require enormous effort to organize, advertise, coordinate and evaluate.

    • Child Advocates offers advanced trainings for volunteer attorneys throughout the year and very few attend.

    • Volunteer attorneys do not primarily practice in this area of law. They are already giving up billable time for our cases. Ongoing training takes a backseat to other priorities.


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    Recommendations necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled

    • Confirm the proposed SCCA hedgehog

    • Direct Representation

      • Reduce the social worker caseload from 80 to 50

        • 2007/2008: 80 to 70

        • 2008/2009: 70 to 60

        • 2009/2010: 60 to 50

      • Change the staff attorney role and ensure caseload is 8 to 10 per; latter to make sure ‘stay current’.

      • Hire spanish speaking social workers to support spanish speaking families/children as clients

      • Improve volunteer model (recruit, train, nurture, retain) by

        • Allocating 1 FTE to role

        • Formalizing case opening meeting to be scheduled by social worker

        • Enhancing regular and on-going communications, e.g., e-newsletter Improve intake process


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    Brutal Facts of Policy necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled


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    Brutal Fact #1: Child Abuse and Neglect in Pennsylvania necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled

    • 31 children died from abuse - nine fewer than in 2005

      • 90% of child deaths age 5 and under

    • 400 (ten percent) substantiated reports involved children who had been abused before.

    • 2,673 (64 percent) substantiated reports involved girls, 1,479 (36 percent) substantiated reports involved boys.

      www.dpw.state.pa.us


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    Brutal Fact #1a: Child Abuse and Neglect in Pennsylvania necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled

    • 63% of substantiated injuries were the result of sexual abuse

      • 1,904 (78 percent) sexually abused children were girls, 526 (22 percent) sexually abused children were boys.

    • 13 of the 31 fatalities were the result of physical neglect; 9 of these deaths resulted from a lack of supervision

      • Nationwide, physical neglect is the reason 59.9% of children in foster care enter the system


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    Brutal Fact #2: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled

    • As agreed during the 2000 Long-Range Plan, the SCCA has focused on policy. That said, a resource plan was not created so the SCCA has no dedicated policy resources.

    • Policy work is incremental to 100% allocated time by the Executive Director and Managing Attorney; each spend 25% of their time.

    • No Board involvement or support


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    Brutal Fact #3: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled

    • The SCCA does not have a criteria for selecting and becoming involved in policy initiatives.

    • The SCCA has a long list of policy initiatives that need to be mapped against a set of criteria.


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    Recommendations necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled

    • Agree criteria that supports “change the story” hedgehog for direct representation

    • Develop and fund resourcing plan including both staff and Board


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    Brutal Facts of the SCCA Resource Engine necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled


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    What best drives our economic necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled or resource engine?

    • Today we would like to identify a few key drivers for SCCA that we want to keep measuring. These “metrics” will give us a snapshot of how our business is doing.

    • Over the next two to three years, SCCA can pay attention to these metrics to see how we are performing against our plan.


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    Brutal Fact #1: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled Contributed services represent 65 percent of SCCA’s budget.

    Volunteers drive the SCCA resource engine.

    Total Revenue Without Services: $2,476,033

    35%

    Total Contributed Services:

    $4,506,613

    65%


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    Brutal Fact #2: necessary to decide what amount of unscheduled time is required to accomplish the unscheduled Over time, cost per child has been increasing.

    Why has cost per child increased?


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    A number of internal and external forces affect SCCA’s cost per child.

    • Cases have become more difficult and more complex.

    • Volunteer attorneys have gotten busier at their law firms, and as a result it takes more volunteers to manage SCCA’s caseload. The increased number of volunteers has made volunteer management more difficult.

    • SCCA’s expectations have increased as a result of implementing “whole child representation.”

    • An expanded fundraising effort has been needed to keep up with SCCA’s growth.


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    What are the implications of the increased cost per child? cost per child.

    If we extrapolate the data*, SCAA’s cost per child will be $2,962 per child in five years. This will put the budget at $2.4 million (an increase of approximately $525,000) to serve the same number of children served today.

    *Data extrapolated at 5 percent increase per year which is the ten-year average.


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    Long Range Plan Cost cost per child.December 18, 2007


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    Total Additional Costs cost per child.


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    Brutal Fact #3: cost per child.Most of SCCA’s budget is achieved through zero-based fundraising every year.

    -3.8K

    -2.5K

    7.6K

    15.3K

    17.6K

    35.4K



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    SCCA has been highly successful in raising money through special events, and net proceeds have consistently increased.


    Scca special event margins l.jpg
    SCCA special events, and net proceeds have consistently increased.Special-Event Margins

    Margin: .76

    Margin: .87

    Margin: .80

    Margin: .74

    Margin: .72

    Margin: .52

    Margin: .74

    Margin: .55


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    Brutal Fact #4: special events, and net proceeds have consistently increased.Special events are the least efficient method of fundraising.

    • According to a recent report by Charity Navigator, the nation’s largest charity evaluator, special events are far less efficient than other forms of fundraising.

    • Taking into consideration staff and volunteer time, marketing, and other costs, organizations spend on average $1.33 to raise $1.00 in contributions at special events, versus $0.15 to raise a dollar otherwise.

    • The “margin” on SCAA events is very high, but this does not take staff and volunteer time into account.



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    Brutal Fact #5: that can still grow substantially?SCCA has not consistently tracked individual giving from its volunteer attorneys as a separate donor population.

    • SCCA has 1,820 volunteer lawyers; approximately 20 percent (or 340) are active each year.

    • Between 12 to 13 percent of total volunteers made a donation in 2006-2007.

    • These 231 donors gave $180,817, an average gift of $440.

    • As a contrast, good alumni participation rates for colleges and universities range from 25 to 66 percent.

    If 66% of SCCA’s 1,820 volunteer lawyer “alums” gave an average gift of $440, they would contribute $528,000 annually.


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    Brutal Fact #6: that can still grow substantially? Board giving was 17% of total individual giving in 2007.

    Board giving last year reached 87% participation, with 28 of 31 members contributing last year. These individuals gave a total of $70,742. (This includes all special-event giving.)

    • Average gift: $2,500


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    Brutal Fact #7: that can still grow substantially? SCCA must first commit to grow and STABILIZE its financial resources before it can consider growing direct services to children.

    Recommendations

    • Initially, SCCA needs to develop a strong annual fund which is a source of renewable contributions, led by its board.

    • Ultimately, SCCA needs to create an endowment to fund operations, which would provide the benefit of reliable annual funding.


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    Resource Engine Back Up that can still grow substantially?


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    New Hire Cost Breakdown that can still grow substantially?


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    New Hire Cost Breakdown that can still grow substantially?December 18, 2007


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    Summary of Recommendations that can still grow substantially?and Implications


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    Recommendations that can still grow substantially?

    • The SCCA hedgehog

    • Direct Representation

      • Reduce the social worker caseload from 80 to 50

        • 2007/2008: 80 to 70

        • 2008/2009: 70 to 60

        • 2009/2010: 60 to 50

      • Change the staff attorney role and ensure caseload is 8 to 10 per; latter to make sure ‘stay current’.

      • Hire spanish speaking social workers to support spanish speaking families/children as clients

      • Improve volunteer model (recruit, train, nurture, retain) by

        • Allocating 1 FTE to role

        • Formalizing case opening meeting to be scheduled by social worker

        • Enhancing regular and on-going communications, e.g., e-newsletter Improve intake process

  • Policy

    • Agree criteria that supports “change the story” hedgehog for direct representation

    • Develop and fund resourcing plan including both staff and Board

  • Resource Engine

    • Initially, SCCA needs to develop a strong annual fund which is a source of renewable contributions, led by its board.

    • Ultimately, SCCA needs to create an endowment to fund operations, which would provide the benefit of reliable annual funding.

  • Build infrastructure, over the first 1 to 2 years of the planning period, for direct representation and policy


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    SCCA Infrastructure that can still grow substantially?


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    Recommendations that can still grow substantially?

    Technology

    Infrastructure

    Current Status

    Immediate Need

    Fortify Need

    Phone

    System

    Service

    Provider

    • Wireless router for visitor access to internet

    • Email notification of voice mail

    • Current ISP contract is for 1 year no- penalty for cancellation with competitive monthly fee

    • Flexible T-1 line and a few backup pots lines

    • Determine if current internet speed is sufficient

    Phone System

    • 20 + yr old - out of date & no tech

    • support available

    • Periodic outages due to old age of system

    • Very difficult to program features

    • Administration of out dated system is time consuming

    • No more hand sets available

    • Need new phone system either PBX (standard) or VOI (Voice over internet) system

    • State-of-the-art VOI system – integrated voice & data system that is reliable & cost efficient to maintain - timeline 1 year

    • Cisco powered switches integrated for phone and internet-data service providing unlimited local/long distance and high speed internet, etc.

    • Receptionist handles every phone call with live voice

    • Staff have to check voice email versus having immediate notification from a VOI system link to their cell phone

    • Automated phone answering system

    • Efficient system to process calls

    • Fax transmission training from individual desktop

    • Increase in ee productivity

    • Hosted phone system

    Phone

    Admin

    • No cell phone provided or reimbursement for staff use

    Cell Phones

    • Options

    • Options

    Brutal Fact : Voice communications are outdated and do not enhance productivity


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    Brutal Facts of Infrastructure that can still grow substantially?

    • Case Management Software

    • Admin Support

    • Business Case for staff productivity

    • Lack of adequate case management software and no integration of current system software

    • No system software backup (currently only data backup for SQL server – fundraising & financial db, Word processing & email traffic)

    • Nonexistent or poor remote access to SCCA data

    • Lack of access to fulltime IT consultant support services

    • Lack of desk top fax capability

    • No building security system (currently no burglar, fire, HVAC system monitoring and no video recording camera at door locations)

    • Key entry only to building (no proximity readers, intercom system or electronic door release)

    • Repair basement foundation leaks

    • We are almost at the limit of staff space; increase in staff would require reconfiguring open spaces or basement; insufficient space for files and few if any wall shelves

    • No office safe to secure $ or valuables nor can staff lock up purses or wallets (valuables in their office)

    • No bathroom facilities on the conference center level

    • Interior of building needs to be repainted

    • Cherry Street sidewalk needs to be repaired

    • Homeless people sleep on the front porch


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    Technology that can still grow substantially?

    Infrastructure

    Current Status

    Immediate Need

    Fortify Need

    Technical Support

    • In house Network Manager Bill McHale

    • T Federwitz / NPower - IT consultants

    • Computer/software training - NPower

    • Technology & Facilities committee

    • Access to full-time consultant support services

    Computer Network

    • Flexible T-1 line 768K minimum to a maximum of 1g bandwidth

    • Increase bandwidth

    • Maximize bandwidth

    • 6 servers - Domain Controller, Alternate Domain controller, SQL Server, Exchange server, Exchange front end, Novell Server with 4-batterys for power backup in case of power loss

    • Upgrade server farm

    • Each server needs its own battery power backup

    • Network disaster plan

    • Upgrade data back-up system

    • Upgrade servers / or use new server technology platform

    • Fortify battery backup

    • Hosted data back-up system & network disaster plan

    Network Servers

    Workstations

    • 27 for ee’s, 11 for students/volunteers

    • CPUs are mix of Pentium 333 Mhz Pentium II - 2.20 GHZ Pentium IV

    • 3 laptops

    • standardized 19” flat screen monitors

    • Data transfer utility / flash drives

    • Upgrade to 20” monitors

    • Laptops for case handlers

    • Upgrade all workstations with standardized platform

    • Upgrade to an all switch environment for faster internet access – timeline 6 months

    • Upgrade switches for fast switch interconnection from current 100 to 1000 mps

    • Cisco powered switches that are integrated for phone and internet-data service – timeline 1 year

    Network Switches

    STRATEGIC PLANInfrastructure: Technology / Technical Support Analysis


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    Immediate Need that can still grow substantially?

    Current Status

    Fortify Need

    • Ceiling mounted LCD with automatic wall screen in basement conference room

    • Multimedia center for basement conference room

    • Specialized printers for special labels

    • 1 copier with color capabilities

    • 1 Pitney Bowes envelope printer

    • 2 HP Laser Jet printers and 8 workstations have 6 HP ink jet printers

    • 2 Savin network copiers- printers-scanners-outgoing fax

    • 1 Dedicated in coming fax machine-printer

    • 1 LCD projector

    Peripherals - Printers / Copiers

    • Upgrade all software and licensing Copy count match # of users

    • Upgrade back-up software

    • Software & Upgrades

    • -Server ghosting software

    • -Workstation ghosting software

    • -Project manager software

    • -Photo Shop software

    • -Visio software

    • -PDF file converter

    • -Smart phone

    • Server licensing

    • -4 Windows ‘03 license users ct 45

    • -1 Windows 2000 license users ct 35

    • -1 Novel 3.11 license with user ct 100

    • -2 MS exchange license user ct 35

    • Workstation

    • -10 XP operation systems

    • -1 Windows NT

    • -1 Windows 98

    • -2 Windows Office 2000

    Software & Licensing

    Operating System

    • Upgrade to Office 2003 Prof.

    • Upgrade to Outlook 2003

    • Office 2000 Proffessional

    • Upgrade to Office 2006 Prof.

    Application

    STRATEGIC PLANInfrastructure: Technology / Technical Support Analysis

    Technology

    Infrastructure


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    Technology that can still grow substantially?

    Infrastructure

    Current Status

    Immediate Need

    Fortify Need

    Development

    • Raiser’s Edge db 7

    • No project management software available for Developmentteam use

    • Clean up RE db address validation & codes

    • Project management software

    • PM software to track timelines for grant proposals& events

    • No HR management software

    • ADP payroll processing

    • Blackbaud Financial Edge

    • HR management software to track ee information

    • Utilize Blackbaud budget software instead of integrated spreadsheets

    • Standardize PTO policy to utilize ADP benefits tracking

    HR & Fiscal

    • Dev software, RE is currently used for tracking Client/volunteer attorney data

    • MS Word is used for tracking client

    • paper work and data (Caseload

    • Directory system)

    • Integrated client and volunteer attorney data into a case management system outside of RE

    • Stand alone case management software

    • Purchase custom stand alone case management software – timeline 1.5 years

    Case

    Management

    System

    • STRATEGIC PLAN

    • Infrastructure: Technology / Technical Support Analysis


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    Technology that can still grow substantially?

    Infrastructure

    Current Status

    Immediate Need

    Fortify Need

    • No burglar or fire alarm system

    • Burglar and fire alarm

    • IP cameras and external PC internet access of security system

    Building

    Security

    System

    • Key entry only (no intercom or electronic door release)

    • Door bell detectible on 1st floor only (receptionist/1st flr staff have to open door to let ee’s into building)

    • Intercom & electric door strikes - door release controller from reception desk for front and back doors

    Proximity card access system

    IP cameras (at front/back doors and driveway)

    Front & Back Doors

    HVAC Link

    • No ability to monitor HVAC system for high/low water temperature problems

    • Monitoring of HVAC system so HVAC vendor and facilities staff can be notified of a problem

    • HVAC Link to security access panel to transmit high/low water temperature in system

    STRATEGIC PLANInfrastructure: Technology / Technical Support Analysis


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    Critical Issues that can still grow substantially?

    • Retention of and Succession Plan for Executive Director

    • Retention and Productivity of SCCA Social Workers and Staff Attorneys

    • Attraction, retention and training of Volunteer Attorneys

    • Fund-raising resulting in $1.7m per year plus lump sum improvements

    • Focused Board/Staff alignment to Long-Range Plan and prioritization of tactics, milestones and timing (minimize scope creep)


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    Strategy Cascade … Objectives, Measures, Tactics with that can still grow substantially?Milestones and TimingSample


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    Next Steps that can still grow substantially?

    • Committees:

      • Board Management – Bylaw Review (K Jaffari)

      • Human Resources (B Reeves, D Fickler)

      • Branding/Communications/PR(B Lev, S McGinley, S Krensel)

      • Development (A Broad, A Stover)

      • Child Policy (J Felix Colton)

      • Volunteers (B Stassen)


    Board scca board and staff productivity is essential l.jpg
    Board – SCCA Board and Staff Productivity is essential that can still grow substantially?

    • As workload has been taken off of Frank’s plate, Board Members are going directly to staff.

    • Board needs to back off of direct involvement and supervision while SCCA Directors need to take a more pro-active role.

    • What decisions does Board need to make?

    Staff ------------ Board

    Advisory

    Project Support

    Strategy

    Operations


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