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Subjects , predicates. and. sentences. Tell me what is happening. Who?. Wass’ up?. Who? Spider Man. Wass’ up? Is running after the bad guys. Spider Man is running after the bad guys!. This is a complete sentence. What must a complete sentence have ?. A subject. Spider Man.

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Subjects , predicates

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Subjects, predicates

and

sentences


Tell me what is happening.

Who?

Wass’ up?


Who? Spider Man

Wass’ up? Is running after the bad guys

Spider Manis running after the bad guys!

This is a complete sentence.


What must a complete sentence have ?

A subject

Spider Man

A predicate

Is running after the bad guys

A sentence must also make sense.


A Subject

tells who or what the sentence is about.

Spider Man battles for justice.

Who battles for justice?

The subject


The predicate tells wass’ up with the subject.

  • The predicate tells what the subject does or has.

  • The predicate can also describe what the subject is or is like.


Spider Man

  • fights for justice. (does)

  • has a strong web. (has)

  • is a hero. (is)

  • is brave. (is like)

    These are predicates.


A sentence must have a subject and a predicateandexpress a complete thought.(make sense)


A sentence fragment …

  • does not express a complete thought.

  • may be missing a subject.

  • may be missing a predicate.

  • may be missing both.


Spider Man with a red cover-all

So… wass’ up with Spider Man in his red cover-alls?

What is missing? The subject or the predicate?

OK! Thepredicate!


…fights for justice and the good guys.

OK… Who fights for justice and the good guys?

What’s missing?

Right! Spider Man!

What is Spider Man?

The Subject


…for justice and the good guys

  • What is missing?

  • the who or what?

  • the wass’ up?

    or

  • both?

OK!

BOTH!


The Complete Subject

Spider Man with his red cover-alls, mask, spinneret's, and green eyes was a fierce fighter.

The complete subject includes all of the words in the subject of the sentence.


The Complete Predicate

Spider Man with his red cover-alls, mask, spinneret's, and green eyes was a fierce fighter.

The complete predicate includes all of the words in the predicate of a sentence.


The Simple Subject

  • is the main word or group of words in the complete subject.

  • is usually a noun or pronoun.

Spider Man in his mask and cover-alls is a hero.


The Simple Predicate

  • is the main word or group of words in the complete predicate.

  • is always a verb.

Spider Man in his mask and cover-alls ran toward the robbers.


Finding Subjects

Declarative Sentences Most statements begin with the subject.

I am Rocky.

I am so cool.

This dog is mine.


Interrogative Sentence Order

Questions may begin with part or all of the predicate. The subject come next followed by the rest of the predicate.

Haveyouseen a dog?

Have I seen a dog?

Why do you ask?


Interrogative Sentences

When questions begin with part or all of the predicate, this is the PSP word order.

Haveyouseen a dog? P S P

Have I seen a dog? P S P

Why do you ask? P S P


To locate the subject of an interrogative sentence,change the question into a declarative sentence. (Make a statement.)

Haveyouseen a dog? Question

Youhave seen a dog. Statement

Have I seen a dog? Question

Ihave seen a dog. Statement

Why do you ask? Question

Youdo ask why. Statement


Most sentences have the subject at the beginning of the sentence and the predicate after the subject.

This is the SPsentence order

Sometimes sentences have inverted word order.

This is the P S sentence order.


Inverted Word Order (The subject is not first.)

Holding the mouse’s tail was a cat!

Whom or what is the sentence about?

The subject is the cat.


Imperative Sentence

In requests and commands, the subject is usually not stated. The word you is understood to be the subject.

You

Catch that cat!


The cat and the dogare not buddies.

Compound Subjects (2 or+ subjects)

Compound Predicates (2 or+ verbs)

The cat hissed and spat.

The dog growled and barked.


Compound subjects and predicates (verbs)

Use and, but,or or to join the compound subjects and predicates.

When you have 3 or more subjects or 3 or more verbs: and, but, or orusually comes before only the last subject or predicate.


Wild Cat, Cool Dude, and Izzy

rule the Bumble’s house.


Wild Cat, Cool Dude, and Izzy

stalk, bite, andscratch the poor Bumbles!


Simple and CompoundSentences

You can put two simple sentences together and make a compound sentence. WOW!


Wild Cat, Cool Dude, and Izzy

are in a cat conspiracy,

but

the Bumblesdon’t know it.


Oh, no!

Run-On Sentences

A run-on sentence is two or more sentences incorrectly written as one sentence.


To correct a run-on sentence,write separate sentences, or combine the sentences.

If you combine the sentences, use either a semicolon alone

or a comma with and, or, or but.

;

, conjunction


Wild Cat, Cool Dude, and Izzy hope you are a sentence wizard in Mrs. Dyer’s class.

So long.


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