Non-Ideal Gases:  How do you relate P, V, T?
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 1

Step 1 : Is the gas ideal or non-ideal? (Page 192) PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 116 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Non-Ideal Gases: How do you relate P, V, T?. Non-ideal if:. Step 1 : Is the gas ideal or non-ideal? (Page 192). If ideal, use PV = nRT. Step 2 : Non-ideal? Choose an approach Equation of State Compressibility Factor. Equations of State give analytic solutions

Download Presentation

Step 1 : Is the gas ideal or non-ideal? (Page 192)

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Step 1 is the gas ideal or non ideal page 192

Non-Ideal Gases: How do you relate P, V, T?

Non-ideal if:

Step 1: Is the gas ideal or non-ideal? (Page 192)

If ideal, use PV = nRT

  • Step 2: Non-ideal? Choose an approach

  • Equation of State

  • Compressibility Factor

  • Equations of State give analytic solutions

  • There are several EOS to choose from

  • SRK explained on p. 203

  • “plug and chug” to solve Eqn 5.3-7 below

  • Compressibility factor “Z”

  • PV = znRT (z is “fudge factor”)

  • Calculate (2 of 3) Pr, Tr, Vr

  • Plots on p. 208-210

  • Find where Pr, Vr, or Tr intersect and read Z

PV = znRT

Notes: 1. Non-ideal gases use “reduced” values for P, T, V so that “universal” equations and plots can be used. Otherwise, every gas (e.g., nitrogen, propane, etc) would have different plots and equations relating P, T, V.

2. is the molar volume = volume divided by the moles (vol/mol)

3. Kay’s Rule: If you have more than one component, the “pseudocritical” T and P are “weighted” by their mole fractions (pg. 211)


  • Login