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Good practice in terms of training and lifelong learning in corporate age management in European Union Member States. Cedefop Agora „Promoting lifelong learning for older workers“ Thessaloniki, 12 - 13 October 2006 . Prof. Dr. Gerhard Naegele, Institute of Gerontology

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Good practice in terms of training and lifelong learning in corporate age management in European Union Member States

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Good practice in terms of training and lifelong learning in corporate age management in european union member states

Good practice in terms of training and lifelong learning in corporate age management in European Union Member States

Cedefop Agora „Promoting lifelong learning for older workers“

Thessaloniki, 12 - 13 October 2006

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Naegele,

Institute of Gerontology

at the University of Dortmund (Germany)


Background to the guide

Background to the guide

  • Project: Employment Initiatives for an Ageing Workforce

  • Founded by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (www.eurofound.eu.int)

  • Joint project coordination by Prof. Dr. Gerhard Naegele (Institute of Gerontology at the University of Dortmund) and Dr. Philip Taylor (University of Cambridge)

  • Review of 130 longstanding case studies in 11 of the EU-15 countries plus further information from new research across the EU including the new Member States (NMS)


What is good practice

What is “good practice”?

Good practice in age management is defined as those measures

  • that combat age barriers and/or promote age diversity.

  • These measures may entail specific initiatives aimed at particular dimensions of age management.

  • They may also include more general employment or human resources policies that help to create an environment in which individual employees are able to achieve their potential without being disadvantaged by their age.


Dimensions of age management practice

Dimensions of age management practice

  • Job recruitment

  • Learning, training and lifelong learning

  • Career development

  • Flexible working time practices

  • Health protection and promotion, and workplace design

  • Redeployment

  • Employment exit and the transition to retirement

  • Comprehensive approaches


Good practice in training and lifelong learning means

Good practice in training and lifelong learning means

  • ensuring that older workers are not neglected in training and career development,

  • that opportunities for learning are offered throughout working life,

  • training methods are appropriate to older workers,

  • and that positive action is taken where necessary to compensate for discrimination in the past.


Examples of good practice in training and lifelong learning

Examples of good practice in training and lifelong learning

  • No age limits,

  • Special motivation efforts, methodology and provision of support,

  • Systematic evaluation,

  • Specific company leave provisions,

  • Analysis of the skills needs of the company,

  • Continuous observance of the individual educational status,

  • Training opportunities as an integral part of career planning,

  • Learning and development of the conducive arrangement of work organisation,

  • Using older employees and their special qualifications.


The benefits of good practice for companies

The benefits of good practice for companies

  • Raising the qualification level and innovation potential of the work force,

  • Enhancing the motivation of younger staff,

  • Improving the quality of a company’s products and services,

  • Guaranteeing of qualification maintenance, development und transfer,

  • Increasing the employability of older staff members,

  • Raising the willingness to learn in later life-phases,

  • Deployment as mentors and teaching staff possible,

  • Training and lifelong learning as important organisational and executive function with high functional value.


Preconditions for effective implementation

Preconditions for effective implementation

  • Sensibilisation of the persons in charge,

  • Training to be based on an exact knowledge of current as well as future company skill requirements and on the educational status and potential of all employees,

  • ‚Competence databases‘,

  • Often, specific external support is needed,

  • Company specific needs as background for selection of methods and strategies,

  • Job rotation in conjunction with on-the-job training is of high value,

  • Working time releases should be facilitated.


General requirements for success and sustainability in age management

General Requirements for success and sustainability in age management

  • Age awareness,

  • Careful planning and implementation,

  • Improvement of working conditions,

  • Cooperation of all parties concerned,

  • Continuous communication,

  • Internal and external monitoring,

  • Final Evaluation and assessment.


Essential ingredients of an integrated age management strategy

Essential ingredients of an integrated age management strategy

  • Emphasising the prevention of age-related work problems (such as the deskilling of older workers and work-related health problems) rather than reactive problem solving;

  • Focusing on the entire working lifespan and all age groups, not just older workers;

  • Ensuring a joined-up approach that brings together all dimensions and actors who contribute to effective age management;

  • Changing attitudes within organisations and in society as a whole to educate people about the need for age diversity;

  • Ensuring, in the short term, catch-up provision for older workers who missed out on specific skills training or whose health was affected adversely by employment;

  • Conducting regular strategic evaluations of age management policies and initiatives to assess their effectiveness.


Good practice in terms of training and lifelong learning in corporate age management in european union member states

Case studies are available on the webpages of the European Foundationwww.eurofound.eu.intThank you for your attention!


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