Control of weeds in rights of way
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Control of Weeds in Rights-of-Way. Mark Ferrell University of Wyoming. Rights-of-Way. Areas involved in common transport Federal, State, County, and Township highways and roads Public airports Railroads Electric utilities / transformer and substations Pipelines / pumping stations

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Control of Weeds in Rights-of-Way

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Control of weeds in rights of way

Control of Weeds in Rights-of-Way

Mark Ferrell

University of Wyoming


Rights of way

Rights-of-Way

  • Areas involved in common transport

    • Federal, State, County, and Township highways and roads

    • Public airports

    • Railroads

    • Electric utilities / transformer and substations

    • Pipelines / pumping stations

    • Public surface drainage ways and irrigation waterways

    • Some public paths and trails


Why bother controlling weeds in rights of way

Why Bother Controlling Weeds in Rights-Of-Way?

  • Often safety hazards

    • Impede safety recovery zone (Clear zone)

    • Impair vision

    • Create fire hazards

    • Cause snow drifting

  • A legal mandate for “Noxious” weeds

  • Potentially damaging to structures

  • To prevent spread

  • To maintain use and maintenance of the ROW and worker safety in ROWs

  • Aesthetics


Weed control options

Weed Control Options

  • Physical

  • Cultural

  • Biological

  • Chemical

  • Develop a complete weed management plan

  • Weed ID for proper herbicide selection

  • There are no silver bullets!


Physical control mechanical

Physical Control: Mechanical

  • Mowing factors to consider

    • Location of the growing points

      • Grasses versus broadleaves

      • Annual versus perennial

    • Timing in relation to plant growth stage

      • Seedling-vegetative-bud-flowering-mature

      • Multiple mowings can reduce root energy reserves

    • Can be used with herbicides successfully

    • Worker and driver safety

      • Risk of flying debris, PTO safety


Control of weeds in rights of way

Growth form of yellow starthistle affects mowing success


Chemical control herbicides

Chemical Control: Herbicides

  • Pre- versus postemergent

  • Selective versus nonselective

  • Contact versus translocated

  • Persistent versus non-persistent


Consider non target vegetation

Consider Non-Target Vegetation

  • Proximity of trees, shrubs, flowers, crops

    • If tree rooting zone extends into treated area…

    • Weed control can be done under trees in many cases (always check the label)

  • Slope

  • Drift, volatility and soil residual activity important

    • Temperature, wind, water, and soil movement


Preventing herbicide resistance

Preventing Herbicide Resistance

  • Continuous use of the same herbicides or modes of action may select for individuals that are more tolerant or resistant to the herbicide

  • Rotate herbicides with different modes of action

  • Kochia, lambsquarters, redroot pigweed


Amino acid inhibitors

Amino Acid Inhibitors

  • Non-persistent

    • Glyphosate (Roundup 3 SC) 1-5 qt/A

  • Persistent

    • Imazapyr (Arsenal 2L) 1-3 qt/A

    • Chlorsulfuron (Telar 75 DF) 0.25-3 oz/A

    • Metsulfuron (Escort 60 DF) 0.33-2 oz/A

    • Sulfometuron (Oust 75 DF) 1.33-12 oz/A


Growth regulators

Growth Regulators

  • Dicamba (Banvel 4L) 0.5-8 qt / A

  • Clopyralid (Transline 3 EC) 0.25-1.33 pt/A

  • Triclopyr (Garlon 3A 3L) 1-12 qt / A

  • Triclopyr (Garlon 4EC) 1-8 qt/A

  • Picloram (Tordon 22K 2L) 1-4 qt / A

  • 2,4-D 4EC 1-2 qt/A


Photosynthesis inhibitors

Photosynthesis Inhibitors

  • Bromacil (Hyvar X 80W) 3-15 lb/A

  • Bromacil + Diuron (Krovar 1 DF) 4-30 lb/A

  • Diuron (Karmex IWC 80DF) 5-15 lb/A

  • Prometon (Pramitol 25E 2L) 5-10 gal/A

  • Tebuthiuron (Spike 20P) 3.8-30 lb/A

  • Hexazinone (Velpar 2L) 1-6 gal/A


Cell membrane disruptors

Cell Membrane Disruptors

  • Paraquat (Gramoxone extra) 2-3 pt/A

  • Diquat (Reward) 1-2 pt/A

  • Glufosinate (Finale) 2-6 qts/A


Cell division inhibitors

Cell Division Inhibitors

  • Oryzalin (Surflan 4EC) 2-6 qt/A

  • Pendimethalin (Pendulum 3.3EC) 2.4-4.8 qt/A

  • Prodiamine (Endurance) 1-2.3 lb/A


Other herbicides

Other Herbicides

  • Fosamine (Krenite-S 4L) 1.5-6 gal/A

    • Inhibits bud development

  • Norflurazon (Solicam DF) 2.5-5 lb/A

  • Norflurazon (Predict) 2.5-5 lb/A

    • Pigment inhibitor


Urban and residential areas

Urban and Residential Areas

  • Use caution when applying volatile or soil residual herbicides in urban areas

  • Tree, shrub, and flower replacement can get quite expensive


Control of weeds in rights of way

Krovar (10 lb/A) + Oust (3 oz/A)


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