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Unit 5, Part 2 from Theseus. Click the mouse button or press the space bar to continue. Splash Screen. Unit 5, Part 2. (pages 968–978). Before You Read. Reading the Selection. After You Read. Respond Through Writing. Selection Menu. For pages 968–978.

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Splash screen

Unit 5, Part 2

from

Theseus

Click the mouse button or press the space bar to continue

Splash Screen


Selection menu

Unit 5, Part 2

(pages 968–978)

Before You Read

Reading the Selection

After You Read

Respond Through Writing

Selection Menu


Before you read

For pages 968–978

Reading Comprehension: LA.910.1.7.5

Analyze a variety of text structures (e.g.,

comparison/contrast, cause/ effect, chronological order, argument/support, lists) and text features (main headings with subheadings) and explain their impact on meaning in text.

Before You Read


Before you read1

Meet Edith Hamilton

Click the picture to learn about the author.

Author SearchFor more about Edith Hamilton, go to glencoe.com and enter QuickPass code GL52922u5.

Before You Read


Before you read2

Literature and Reading Preview

Connect to the Story

How do you handle difficult choices? Write a journal entry in which you describe how you deal with challenging decisions.

Before You Read


Before you read3

Literature and Reading Preview

Build Background

The body of stories that tell of the gods, heroes, and ceremonies of the ancient Greeks is known as Greek mythology. This mythology is a source of inspiration for contemporary writers.

Before You Read


Before you read4

Literature and Reading Preview

Set Purposes for Reading

Rescuing and Conquering

As you read, ask yourself, How do the opposing themes of rescuing and conquering emerge, often side by side?

Before You Read


Before you read5

Literature and Reading Preview

Set Purposes for Reading

Image Archetype

Image archetypes, images that recur throughout literature across cultures, are believed to have universal meaning. The stone in Greek mythology, for example, is symbolic of an obstacle in life. A cup is symbolic of one’s fate or destiny. As you read, ask yourself, What archetypical images can I find?

Before You Read


Before you read6

Literature and Reading Preview

Set Purposes for Reading

Identify Sequence

Identifying sequence in a story means recognizing the logical order of events or ideas. Events in fiction usually occur in chronological order, or the order in which they happen in time. As you read, ask yourself, Where are signal words such as first, there, following, during, and before?

Before You Read


Before you read7

Literature and Reading Preview

Set Purposes for Reading

Identify Sequence

Tip: AnnotateWhen you read, annotate, or take note of, time and place sequences. Watch for transitional and signal words. Write critical notes that comment on the sequences.

Before You Read


Before you read8

Literature and Reading Preview

contemptibleadj. worthy of contempt; loathsome; p. 971 The bank robbery was a contemptible act that endangered lives.

endearv. to cause to adore or admire; p. 972 Writing a letter to show gratitude would endear the child to his parent’s friend.

confinementn. the state of being restricted or confined; p. 972 Confinement was the most dreaded punishment for the teenager.

Click a vocabulary term to listen to the definition.

Before You Read


Before you read9

Literature and Reading Preview

Tip: Word Parts You can find the meanings of common roots online. Choose sites with reputable print versions or sites sponsored by respected institutions.

Before You Read


Before you read10

Before You Read


Reading the selection

Image ArchetypeRead the text highlighted in purple on page 970. What might lifting a great stone typically represent?

Answer:The lifting of the stone is symbolic of overcoming a great life obstacle now or in the future.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection1

Image ArchetypeRead the text highlighted in purple on page 970. The stone is intended to prevent Theseus from retrieving the sword and shoes until the proper time. What would you call something that stood in your way?

Answer:an obstacle

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection2

Look at the painting on page 970. Describe the setting of Theseus’s childhood based on the details in the painting.

Answer:You might note the peaceful atmosphere, with humans and animals sharing the land in harmony. You might also note the classical architecture and the beautiful natural scenery. Overall, the scene has the feeling of a fairy tale.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection3

Rescuing and ConqueringRead the text highlighted in tan on page 971. How does this method of justice exhibit the ideas of rescuing and conquering?

Answer:Theseus’s punishment of the bandits rescues the victims by ridding them of the treacherous men, while simultaneously conquering the bandits themselves through defeat.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection4

Look at the painting on page 971. Theseus easily moved the large stone to discover his father’s sword and shoes. Is this how you pictured the scene that Hamilton describes? Why or why not?

Answer:Responses will vary. The observant might note that this painting is stylistically similar to seventeenth-century European religious art.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection5

Image ArchetypeRead the first text highlighted in purple on page 972. A sword in Greek mythology often represents legacy. Explain the importance of Theseus establishing his legacy at this point in the story.

Answer:Had Theseus not drawn his sword, his father would not have recognized him, and he would have consumed the poison and died.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection6

Identify SequenceRead the text highlighted in blue on page 972.What does the signal word “then” indicate?

Answer:The word then is a clue that one event took place and the other will follow. This reflects the sequence of events.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection7

Rescuing and ConqueringRead the text highlighted in tan on page 973. How does the ball of thread reflect the idea of rescuing and conquering?

Answer:The yarn may be a rescue aid. With it, the Minotaur can be conquered.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection8

Look at the sculpture on page 973. This sculpture depicts Theseus dominating the Minotaur. Why might the sculptor have chosen to depict the battle in this way? Explain.

Answer:Youmay say that the strength of Theseus is emphasized by his size and stance in the sculpture.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection9

Identify SequenceRead the text highlighted in blue on page 974.How does this sentence help you understand the sequence of events?

Answer:It explains that the following events happened at a specific, different place (Naxos), after the adventure in the labyrinth.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection10

Look at the painting on page 974. Hamilton claims that women often fell in love with Theseus at first sight. What artistic choices did Gennari make that allowed him to successfully depict Theseus’s allure?

Answer:Youmay comment on the way Theseus’s body is leaning toward one of the women and he is making eye contact with her.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection11

Rescuing and ConqueringRead the text highlighted in tan on page 975. Explain how Theseus’s actions employ both ideas of rescuing and conquering.

Answer:Theseus rescues the vanquished from the Thebans’ refusal to bury their dead. He conquers Thebes so that the victims may be vindicated.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection12

Look at the painting on page 975. How is Connolly’s knowledge of ancient Greece evident in the details he chooses to include in this illustration?

Answer:You may point out the clothing or the ship with banks of rowers.

Reading the Selection


Reading the selection13

Reading the Selection


After you read

Respond and Think Critically

Respond and Interpret

1.From this retelling, what are your impressions of Theseus’s character?

Answer:You should indicate either approval or disapproval of Theseus, and cite examples of his heroism or his self-serving behavior.

After You Read


After you read1

Respond and Think Critically

Respond and Interpret

2.(a) Why does Theseus refuse to seek his father by water? (b) How does this decision affect the myth’s plot?

Answer: (a) To seek his father by water would be too easy. (b) Theseus endures many difficult situations because of his decision to travel by land.

After You Read


After you read2

Respond and Think Critically

Respond and Interpret

3.(a) How does Aegeus intend to kill Theseus? (b) What image archetype does this represent?

Answer: (a) With the poisoned cup provided by Medea, who knows Theseus’s true identity (b) The image archetype of the cup is fate or destiny.

After You Read


After you read3

Respond and Think Critically

Analyze and Evaluate

4.(a) How does the author reveal a lack of certainty in the myth’s legacy?

Answer:(a) The author reveals uncertainty by giving varying accounts of Theseus and Adriadne’s separation.

After You Read


After you read4

Respond and Think Critically

Analyze and Evaluate

4.(b) Does this uncertainty diminish the myth’s credibility? Explain.

Answer:(b) You should support your ideas with examples from the text.

After You Read


After you read5

Respond and Think Critically

Analyze and Evaluate

5.(a) How has Theseus changed by the story’s conclusion?

Answer:(a) He is not interested in conquering, rather in establishing a commonwealth. His behavior is not merely self-serving, but benefits others.

After You Read


After you read6

Respond and Think Critically

Analyze and Evaluate

5.(b) What events have led to this change, and why are they significant?

Answer:(b) Theseus has been humbled by the loss of his lover and father and by his battles and struggles.

After You Read


After you read7

Respond and Think Critically

Connect

Rescuing and Conquering

6.Greek mythology encompasses many acts of rescuing and conquering. Which do you think is more prevalent in “Theseus”—rescuing, or conquering? Support your opinion.

Answer: Those impressed by his acts of heroism may state that more rescuing occurred. Those influenced by the violence in the story will say that more conquering occurred.

After You Read


After you read8

Respond and Think Critically

Connect

7.Connect to Today Which of Theseus’s traits would be welcome in the leaders of today? Explain.

Answer: You should note traits such as bravery, honesty, fairness, and a desire to provide justice.

After You Read


After you read9

Pleasing the Gods Greeks, in their daily lives, had to consider the happiness of countless gods. Pleasing the gods through daily rituals was more important than knowing exactly how many gods there were. In fact, some special altars were created specifically for worshipping potential unknown gods.

After You Read


After you read10

The contentment of the gods was assured not through correct beliefs, but through proper action. Greek people worshipped their gods diligently and made appropriate sacrifices to them to lessen the chances of retribution.

After You Read


After you read11

Group Activity Discuss the following questions with your classmates.

After You Read


After you read12

1.The ancient Greeks were expected to keep the gods happy. How might everyday activities be affected by this responsibility? Explain.

Answer: Since the gods’ happiness was such a priority, a Greek might have daily activities interrupted with acts of praise and with plans of sacrifice.

After You Read


After you read13

2.In Greek mythology, what action might take place if a human displeased a god?

Answer: Responses may include financial troubles, illness, or death inflicted on the human.

After You Read


After you read14

Image Archetype

The use of image archetypes in works of mythology can help an author communicate with his or her readers. Since the meanings and importance of a work’s images have already been established, the author does not have to work to make readers understand the significance of the images.

After You Read


After you read15

Image Archetype

1.Which image archetypes stand out the most in “Theseus”? Select one that you think is true to life. Explain your choice.

Answer:Your choice of archetypes that are true to life will vary. Answers should be supported with reasons.

After You Read


After you read16

Image Archetype

2.Can a reader who is unfamiliar with the image archetypes of Greek literature understand and enjoy “Theseus”? Explain.

Answer:Yes. The archetypes deepen the meaning of the work, but are not required for a general reading of the text.

After You Read


After you read17

Image Archetype

3.How does the use of image archetypes in “Theseus” strengthen or weaken the plot?

Answer:The universal meanings of image archetypes tie them to a long history of myths and literary works; they make the story more complex and heighten its meaning.

After You Read


After you read18

Review: Plot Pattern Archetype

As you learned on page 959, plot pattern archetype is a recurring plot arrangement found across cultures in literary works.

After You Read


After you read19

Review: Plot Pattern Archetype

Partner Activity Meet with a classmate to discuss the plot pattern archetypes of “Theseus.” Work with your partner to create a two-column chart like the one shown.

After You Read


After you read20

Review: Plot Pattern Archetype

Fill in the left-hand column with examples of plot pattern archetypes. Use the right-hand column to list examples of each archetype from “Theseus.”

After You Read


After you read21

Identify Sequence

LA.910.1.7.5

1.Read this sentence from the narrative.

Such was the doom which awaited fourteen youths and maidens a few days after Theseus reached Athens.

The phrase such was indicates that

After You Read


After you read22

Identify Sequence

LA.910.1.7.5

A. the reader is about to learn what will happen to these young people.

B. these youths and maidens were about to experience a terrible fate.

C. the author has just explained what this “doom” involved.

D. Theseus arrived before the young people met their fate.

After You Read


After you read23

Practice with Word PartsFor each boldfaced vocabulary word, find the meaning of the word’s root. Also look for definitions of any prefixes or suffixes in the word. List the meanings in a diagram like the one shown. Then use the word correctly in a sentence.

After You Read


After you read24

Example

After You Read


After you read25

1.contemptible

Answer:

Prefix: con-, “with, similar”

Root: temnere, “despise”

Suffix: -ible, “capable of”

Sentence: Being mean to the young child was a contemptible action.

After You Read


After you read26

2.endear

Answer:

Prefix: en-, “put into or onto”

Root: dear, “valued”

Sentence: Phil saw an opportunity to endear himself to the new principal.

After You Read


After you read27

3.confinement

Answer:

Prefix: con-, “with, similar”

Root: finis, “end”

Suffix: -ment, “act of”

Sentence: Sarah spent her long illness in confinement.

After You Read


After you read28

After You Read


Respond through writing

Expository Essay

Informative Writing: LA.910.4.2.3 Write

informational/expository essays that speculate on the causes and effects of a situation, establish the connection between the postulated causes or effects, offer evidence supporting the validity of the proposed causes or effects, and include introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs.

Respond Through Writing

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing1

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

Analyze Cause and Effect Hamilton retells a series of heroic episodes from the life of Theseus in a unified narrative. Choose one critical point in the life of Theseus and analyze the causes, or the causal chain of events, that lead up to it. Also explain how the effects of those events stretch beyond the life of the hero.

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing2

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

Prewrite Review the sequence chart you made as you read. Jot down two or more events that interest you. Then develop a cause-and-effect chain like the one below for one of those events, adding as many boxes as you need to explain the event and its results.

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing3

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

Discuss your ideas with a partner before you begin to draft.

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing4

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

Draft Use your introduction to spark the reader’s interest about Theseus. Present a thesis that provides an overview of the cause-and-effect relationships you will analyze. In your body paragraphs, discuss the causal chain of events in chronological order, drawing the best evidence from the text to support your claims about causes, a critical or crisis point, and effects.

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing5

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

Revise Trade papers with a partner. Ask a classmate to underline your evidence and to assess its clarity and validity. Revise by substituting stronger evidence or by making clearer connections between your claims and evidence and between your causes and their effects.

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing6

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

In your conclusion, use a graphic to summarize your essay or include a summary statement based on this sentence frame:

Hamilton shows how a chain of events beginning with ______ eventually led to ______.

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing7

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

Edit and Proofread Proofread your paper, correcting any errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Use the Grammar Tip on the following slides to help you with transitional expressions.

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing8

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

Transitional Expressions

Make your writing clearer and more coherent by using cause-and-effect transitional words and phrases.

Because Theseus failed to change the sail, Aegeus leapt into the sea. Therefore, the bull killed the youth, and Minos invaded the country.

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing9

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

Transitional Expressions

Other transitional words and phrases that show cause-and-effect relationships include:

as a result consequentlyand so thenled to sincefor so that

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing10

Expository Essay

Respond Through Writing

Transitional Expressions

Sentence Frames You might use the following sentence frames in your essay.

  • As a result, ______.

  • Hamilton shows how a chain of events beginning with ______ eventually led to ______.

Respond Through Writing


Respond through writing11

Respond Through Writing


Vocabulary workshop

Word Origins

Vocabulary Development: LA.910.1.6.10 Determine meanings of words, pronunciation, parts of speech, etymologies, and alternate word choices by using a dictionary, thesaurus and digital tools.

Vocabulary Workshop

Vocabulary Workshop


Vocabulary workshop1

Word Origins

Vocabulary Workshop

Greek and Roman Mythology

Literature ConnectionIn the passage below, Hamilton mentions the Labyrinth built by Daedalus, the famed mythological architect and sculptor.

“Daedalus built the Labyrinth, famous throughout the world. Once inside, one would go endlessly along its twisting paths without ever finding the exit.”

—Edith Hamilton, from “Theseus”

Vocabulary Workshop


Vocabulary workshop2

Word Origins

Vocabulary Workshop

The term labyrinth initially referred only to Daedalus’s creation, which was used to house the Minotaur, a fearsome creature that was part man and part bull. However, over time the term’s meaning has come to refer to any kind of maze, or a complex structure or idea. The etymology, or history, of this word is not an anomaly; in fact, Greek and Roman mythology is the source of many words that are currently used in English.

Vocabulary Workshop


Vocabulary workshop3

Word Origins

Vocabulary Workshop

Becoming familiar with word origins, or the sources of words from other languages or older forms of English, can increase your vocabulary.

Vocabulary Workshop


Vocabulary workshop4

Word Origins

Vocabulary Workshop

This chart shows the Greek and Roman origins of some English words.

Vocabulary Workshop


Vocabulary workshop5

Word Origins

Vocabulary Workshop

PracticeFor the item below, choose the English word from the chart above that best completes the sentence.

1. Crushing boulders for the new road would have been a __________ task without the help of machinery.

herculean

Vocabulary Workshop


Vocabulary workshop6

Word Origins

Vocabulary Workshop

PracticeFor the item below, choose the English word from the chart above that best completes the sentence.

mercurial

2. The actor’s __________ temper made him difficult to work with.

Vocabulary Workshop


Vocabulary workshop7

Word Origins

Vocabulary Workshop

PracticeFor the item below, choose the English word from the chart above that best completes the sentence.

Olympian

3. A roar from the fans cheered the __________ track star on.

Vocabulary Workshop


Vocabulary workshop8

Word Origins

Vocabulary Workshop

Word OriginsWord origins are the histories of words. Word origins generally include the other languages or earlier forms of English that words came from.

Vocabulary Workshop


Vocabulary workshop9

Word Origins

Vocabulary Workshop

TipLearning to recognize Greek and Latin word roots, such as those in the chart, can help you determine the meanings of unfamiliar words on a test.

Vocabulary For more vocabulary practice, go to glencoe.com and enter QuickPass code GL52922u5.

Vocabulary Workshop


Bellringer

What is your definition of a hero?

Have you ever witnessed a hero in action? How did you feel after observing this act of heroism?

Bellringer


Bellringer transparency

Unit 5, Part 2

Knowing many adjectives, understanding their

meanings, and using them correctly can improve writing.

Using adjectives incorrectly can weaken your story, poem, or essay.

Bellringer Transparency


What did aegeus place under a stone to be used by theseus

What did Aegeus place under a stone to be used by Theseus?

  • an acorn and a ball of string

  • a ring and a book

  • a sword and a pair of shoes

  • a crown and a pen


Who does hamilton say was always in theseus mind

Who does Hamilton say, was always in Theseus’ mind?

  • Hercules

  • Aegeus

  • his mother

  • Sinis


How did medea know theseus s true identity

How did Medea know Theseus’s true identity?

  • from Aegeus

  • from the mayor of Theseus’shometown in the north

  • through sorcery

  • through her friendship with Theseus’s mother


Why did theseus volunteer to be one of the victims sent to crete

Why did Theseus volunteer to be one of the victims sent to Crete?

  • to get away from his father

  • to prove that he could escape the Labyrinth

  • to impress Athenians

  • to kill the Minotaur


Why did aegeus throw himself into the sea

Why did Aegeus throw himself into the sea?

  • He was afraid that Minos was approaching to seek revenge.

  • He believed that Theseus had died.

  • He was sad about the death of Ariadne.

  • He had lost his mind because of illness.


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