Technology transfer at the university of colorado health sciences center l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 30

Technology Transfer at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 79 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Technology Transfer at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Introduction Mission Capabilities Goals Technology Licenses Start ups Successes Questions. Vivian Dullien, PhD Director [email protected] Rick Silva, PhD Licensing Associate [email protected]

Download Presentation

Technology Transfer at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Technology transfer at the university of colorado health sciences center l.jpg

Technology Transfer at the University of ColoradoHealth Sciences Center

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Vivian Dullien, PhD Director

[email protected]

Rick Silva, PhD

Licensing Associate

[email protected]

Jennifer Eby, MS, MBA

Licensing Associate

[email protected]

Jill Jones

Contract Administrator

[email protected]


Our mission l.jpg

Our Mission

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

…aggressively pursue, protect, package, and license to business the intellectual property generated from the research enterprise and to serve faculty, staff, and students seeking to create such intellectual property.


Slide3 l.jpg

Our stakeholders

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

The University

Faculty

VPAAR, President, and Regents

Students

The Community

Our partners

Industries we partner with

The business community at large


Functions l.jpg

Functions

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Faculty Service

Commercial partnerships and contracts

Revenue Center for the University

Licensing royalties and research revenues

Augment Impact of Research Mission

Commercial development of tangible/intellectual output

Economic Development

Startups and jobs


Slide5 l.jpg

Guiding Principles

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Faculty involvement in the commercialization process

Create long-term value through commercial investment and technology adoption

Transactions reflect upside for the University

Recover patent costs and reinvest in our faculty

Adopt and implement “best practices” for licensing

Empowerment of a skilled and experienced professional staff

Responsiveness to industry needs and requests


Service capabilities l.jpg

Service capabilities

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

For Faculty…

Management of intellectual resources

Foster industry partnerships

License and commercialize technology

Educational programs in concert with business community

Assistance in networking, raising capital, establishing management


Service capabilities7 l.jpg

Service capabilities

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

  • Facilitate collaborations from an industry friendlyperspective

  • Access to our pipeline

  • Finding synergy

  • Defining and creating opportunities

  • Market research, diligence, and business plans in University startups

  • Management of conflicts-of interest, contracts, and other aspects of University-commercial relationships

For the business community…


Benchmarks l.jpg

Benchmarks

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

$300 M in federal funding in FY 2000

CU ranks #4 among all public institutions and #8 among all institutions in federal R&D funding

CU Health Sciences Center ranked 5th among all public U.S. medical schools in NIH funding per faculty member

By most accounts CU has been under- performing in technology licensing


Our context l.jpg

Our context

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

  • The Front Range is an entrepreneurial technology centric, destination community.

  • Fitzsimmons BioPark is a lifetime opportunity.

  • The technology licensing operation changed organizational structure four times in last 12 years.

  • Administration is committed to high performance operation – moving from 8 to 15 employees.

  • President Hoffman is committed to a University Without Walls as part of her vision for 2010.


Hard metrics l.jpg

Hard Metrics

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Disclosure rates

Patents issued

Companies started

Products launched

Revenues generated


Hard metrics11 l.jpg

Hard Metrics

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions


Target metrics l.jpg

Target Metrics

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

GROWTH

Disclosures Patents Startups Revenues


Soft metrics l.jpg

Soft Metrics

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Sound portfolio

Inventor sophistication

Entrepreneurial potential

Business relationships

Jobs creation

Economic impact

Societal impact


Our challenges l.jpg

Our challenges

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Balancing the academic mission with the commercial objective

Meeting our peer benchmarks

Engendering the trust and participation of our faculty

Adapting to swift and brutal changes in market forces and the business environment

Bridging the “gap”

…Our history is not our destiny


Technology l.jpg

Technology

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

The ideal…

The inventor has thought about a problem in the context of product development for a lucrative market

Proof of concept work is done

Infrastructure in place to exploit technology

The commercial partner in is the queue

…the blockbuster drug or the killer app


Technology16 l.jpg

Technology

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

The reality…

Raw technologies

Not directed to a market problem

Product has not been defined or conceived

Data directed at curiosity, publication, and next grant cycle

Lack of infrastructure for revolutionary advances

…a solution looking for a problem


Technology the gap l.jpg

Technology- the “gap”

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

The risk gap- this is not venture capital

SBIR/STTR

CAPCO

RAID and RAPID programs at NIH

Some universities have gap funds


Licensing l.jpg

Licensing

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Product IP

Typically exclusive, rarely a startup

Platform IP

Startup or existing company, sometimes divided uses

Process IP

Often nonexclusive to existing companies


Licensing19 l.jpg

Licensing

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Therapeutic compositions

Typically exclusive, valuable but rare

Drug delivery and formulation

Startup or existing company, sometimes divided uses, often freedom to operate and other strategic issues

Drug discovery and development

Often nonexclusive to existing companies, rarely end up in a product

Reagents

Distribution licenses, rarely patented unless they have a product or proprietary gate element


Licensing20 l.jpg

Licensing

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Biomarkers and diagnostics

Typically nonexclusive, most don’t have regulatory and clinical lab infrastructure in place

Software

Bioinformatics tools, usually code modules requiring interface, platform and recoding


Start ups l.jpg

Start Ups

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Ingredients for Success:

Professional management

Adequate capitalization

Market scope

Involved inventor- marquee name

Technology- Platform or process IP

Experienced, serial management, board, inventors, and investors


Start ups liquidity events l.jpg

Start UpsLiquidity events

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Amgen* (Kineret 2002 sales of $70 million, cofounded by CU researcher Dr. Marv Carruthers)

Ribozyme (UCB; over $100 million, now Sirna; a Nobel prize)

NexStar/Biostar (UCB; $550 million purchase by Gilead)

Eyetech ($124 million)

Myogen ($70 million IPO + 90 Million private; $350 million cap)

Dharmacon ($80 million, private purchase)

…over $1 Billion in equity capital raised with CU life sciences technology in a decade


Start ups venture funded companies l.jpg

Start UpsVenture funded companies

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Replidyne ($13 million)

Globeimmune ($8 million)

SomaLogic (UCB; $19.5 million)

RxKinetix (>$3 million)

Acceleration bioPharmaceuticals


Start ups on the radar screen l.jpg

Start UpsOn the radar screen…

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Newellink (Immunolgy and metabolism)

Lohocla (Psychiatry biomarkers)

ARCA discovery (Cardiac drugs)

Sentry Biosciences (Cancer, apoptosis)

Trasona (IV drugs for trauma and stress)

Taligen (Complement mediated diseases)

Barofold (Protein therapeutic processing)

Activedry (Drug formulation and delivery)


Slide25 l.jpg

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Licensing and foundational roles

Dr. Marv Carruthers DNA synthesis technologies

Kineret- Dr. William Arend

Clinical development and license collaborations


Slide26 l.jpg

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

A model case:

An entrepreneurial faculty group

True synergies leveraging University assets on the cutting edge

Strong inventors

An evolving partnership


Nexstar l.jpg

NeXstar

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

SELEX* aptamer technology- implications in:

Drug discovery (Gilead and Eyetech)

Biosensors

Diagnostics (Somalogic)

Chromatography

*Systematic Evolution of Ligands of Exponential enrichment


Summary l.jpg

Summary

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions

Our current system portfolio:

Patents Issued 240

Patents in Prosecution: 151

Active Licenses/Options:155

Viable Start-ups:27


Questions l.jpg

Questions?

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions


Slide30 l.jpg

TTO Business Advisory Board

Sandy Bracken, Director, Bard Center for Entrepreneurship, CU Denver

Chad Brownstein, Partner, ITU Ventures

Michael Byram, President, University of Colorado Foundation

Greg Carlisle, Partner, Gefinor Ventures

Maggie Cary, Chief Medical Officer, Colorado Business Group on Health

Chris Christoffersen, Partner, Morgenthaler Ventures

Ken Collins, President, Replidyne

Tim Conner, Partner, Sequel Ventures

Dave Cook, Counsel, Faegre & Benson

Lu Cordova, President, Colorado Technology Incubator (CTEK)

Jerry Donahue, President, University License and Equity Holdings, Inc.

Dee Dee LeGrande, CEO, BRW Legrand

Kyle Lefkoff, Managing Partner, Boulder Ventures

Jim Linfield, Managing Partner, Cooley Godward

Dallas Martin, Vice President and General Counsel, SwitchPoint Networks, Inc.

Bill Mooz, VP, International Business Development, Sun Microsystems

Bob Olsen, Executive Director, Fitzsimmons Redevelopment Authority

Gary Powell, Partner, KPMG

Juan Rodriquez, Co-founder of StorageTek and Exabyte

Kathy Simon, Director, Deming Center for Entrepreneurship, CU, Boulder

Don VanLandingham, past CEO/President, Ball Aerospace

Four Faculty Contributors: Bill Arend, Rheumatology and Boris Tabakoff,

Pharmacology, HSC; Bob Erickson and Garrett Moddel, CU Boulder, Engineering

Introduction

Mission

Capabilities

Goals

Technology

Licenses

Start ups

Successes

Questions


  • Login