Defoliators
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 13

Defoliators PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 157 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Defoliators. d efinition: adult or larval insect that strips all the leaves from a tree or shrub. Characteristics. pattern on individual leaves “shot hole” “leaf mines” “skeleton” structures that they create from which to feed time of the growing season that feeding occurs. Phases.

Download Presentation

Defoliators

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Defoliators

Defoliators

definition:

adult or larval insect that strips all the leaves from a tree or shrub


Defoliators

Characteristics

pattern on individual leaves

  • “shot hole” “leaf mines” “skeleton”

    structures that they create from which to feed

    time of the growing season that feeding occurs


Defoliators

Phases

Non-outbreak: areas where no defoliation is noticed in aerial overviews, and insect numbers are low.

Buildingphase: when insect populations increase, yet very little or no defoliation is visible from aerial surveys.

Outbreak phase: the time period when defoliating insects are causing noticeable damage.

Declining phase: the time interval when areas of defoliation and insect numbers decline and large amounts of damaged trees are visible.


Defoliators

Ancylisapicana

Leaf-folder where larvae connect silk to two sides of a leaf and pull them together into the folded position. Although its range is identified as across the northern United States and adjacent Canada, it was only identified from Washington in 2009.


Defoliators

Apple-and-thorn skeletonizer

A widespread native defoliator moth that feeds on apple, cherry, birch, hawthorn, willow, and mountain ash. Multiple generations per year create distinctive skeletonized leaves by eating only the surface of leaves and webbing leaves into a cup shape.


Defoliators

Epinotiaalbangulana

A native and common defoliator that feeds alder trees. Found from California to British Columbia and Idaho. One generation per year.


Defoliators

Fall Webworm

Native web-making species. During outbreak years commonly seen in wide variety of fruit and deciduous. One generation per year.


Defoliators

Oblique-banded leafroller

Native defoliator. Most commonly on fruit trees in eastern and western Washington and Idaho. Two generations per year and overwinters as larvae.


Defoliators

Orange tortrix

Native species common at times on a large list of fruit trees. Two generations per year and overwinters as larvae.


Defoliators

Oreanaunicolorella

Oreanaunicolorella is found across the northern United States and southeastern Canada. This leaf roller has a wide host range, including apple, birch, elm, willow, and maple.


Defoliators

Silver-spotted tiger moth

The most common native web-making species in conifers in the North West region. Larva overwinter in small tents, which grow to visibility in spring.


Defoliators

Tent caterpillar

One of several native tent-making species in the North West. Various species feed on fruit trees, ornamentals and native trees. Most feed as a group in tents. One generation per year, overwinter in egg stage.


Defoliators

  • Sources

  • Barrett, Bruce . “Insect Defoliators of Missouri Trees: Web Producers.” 2012. extension.missouri.edu. 25 November 2012. Web.

  • Moorhead, D.J. “Forest Pest Control.” 2012. www.bugwood.org/. 25 November 2012. Web.

  • http://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/?id=1624

  • http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&

  • http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&


  • Login