Managing the tricky times: conflict resolution and negotiating differences

Managing the tricky times: conflict resolution and negotiating differences PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 126 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Workshop Aims. To provide you with:an understanding of conflicta useful model of conflict resolutiona brief review of the Policy and Procedures for student complaints and grievances. Understanding Conflict. Conflict can simply be defined as:when two or more people have currently incompatible goa

Download Presentation

Managing the tricky times: conflict resolution and negotiating differences

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. Managing the tricky times: conflict resolution and negotiating differences

2. Workshop Aims To provide you with: an understanding of conflict a useful model of conflict resolution a brief review of the Policy and Procedures for student complaints and grievances

3. Understanding Conflict Conflict can simply be defined as: when two or more people have currently incompatible goals when two or more people cannot agree but need to make a decision when one person feels personal rights have been violated (McGrath & Edwards 2000) Conflict is inevitable and pervasive. Conflict is essentially based in perceptions and feelings. There is no simple formula that makes conflict go away. There are some common negative responses to conflict that maximise its destructive effects. Stress increases the risk of destructive conflict. A flexible, adaptive and collaborative approach to conflict is generally more effective. Conflict is inevitable and pervasive. Conflict is essentially based in perceptions and feelings. There is no simple formula that makes conflict go away. There are some common negative responses to conflict that maximise its destructive effects. Stress increases the risk of destructive conflict. A flexible, adaptive and collaborative approach to conflict is generally more effective.

4. Conflict Characters Approaches to conflict Understanding more about our own approach to conflict supports objectivity and autonomy in decision making about how to respond to conflict. Conflict characters Game; Owl, Turtle, Teddy, Shark . Scenario is “You have been standing in a queue in a shop during the sales and a young woman pushes in two people in front of you. You react and respond by………….” Each person is to move and stand by their Conflict Character and describe what they would do. This develops self-understanding of the unique conflict style for each person.Understanding more about our own approach to conflict supports objectivity and autonomy in decision making about how to respond to conflict. Conflict characters Game; Owl, Turtle, Teddy, Shark . Scenario is “You have been standing in a queue in a shop during the sales and a young woman pushes in two people in front of you. You react and respond by………….” Each person is to move and stand by their Conflict Character and describe what they would do. This develops self-understanding of the unique conflict style for each person.

5. Negative Aspects of Conflict Conflict is often regarded as negative, destructive and undesirable. Conflict can: hinder communication interfere with relationships increase problems erect barriers

6. Positive Aspects of Conflict Conflict can also be creative and constructive. Conflict can: promote new ideas strengthen relationships encourage interpersonal communication stimulate individual growth facilitate the examination of problems

7. Your Concerns What are the real or potential conflict issues for you as an academic? Small group to discuss conflict situations? Discuss in pairs? Spokesperson to report one situation to group and these will be recorded on a white board or plain paper. We can then select snippets or scenarios from these.Small group to discuss conflict situations? Discuss in pairs? Spokesperson to report one situation to group and these will be recorded on a white board or plain paper. We can then select snippets or scenarios from these.

8. Some useful strategies Focus on the problem, not the person Focus on requirements, not positions Emphasise common ground: be inventive about options Manage your emotions: respond not react Make clear agreements Time out Public place All conflict resolution depends on agreements between the people involved. Essentially, conflict resolution requires agreement in three major areas: Agreement on the problem (the participants must agree that there is a conflict or conflicts) Agreement on the process Agreement on a plan for resolution Time out Public place All conflict resolution depends on agreements between the people involved. Essentially, conflict resolution requires agreement in three major areas: Agreement on the problem (the participants must agree that there is a conflict or conflicts) Agreement on the process Agreement on a plan for resolution

9. Strategies What strategies have you found useful in dealing with conflict? Group work group brainstorming depending on size (up to 8 participants) Whiteboard (10-15 minutes). list and record.Group work group brainstorming depending on size (up to 8 participants) Whiteboard (10-15 minutes). list and record.

10. A Useful Model of CR Models or stages offer a useful checklist for resolving conflict. In general, the following stages will be worked through: Agreement on the conflict Agreement on the process Agreement on a plan for resolution Sharing perceptions Responding Defining objectives Exploring option(s) Selecting option(s) Implementing Evaluating and reviewing (Adapted from Tillett 1999)

11. A Useful Model of CR AAA The three Agrees SR Share/Respond DESIE Move to desired outcome

12. 1. Agreement on the Conflict What is the conflict? Often conflict is imprecisely defined e.g.”We have a poor working relationship”. Identify the conflict(s) precisely and specifically Phrased in neutral, objective terms

13. 2. Agreement on the Process This agreement may include: Agreement to work it out together Agreement to seek assistance from a third party (e.g. student advocate, coordinator) When to meet, where, how the discussion will be arranged, degree of formality, what ground rules will apply (no accusations, attacks, blaming, name-calling)

14. Grievance Processes Policy and Procedures for student complaints and grievances. Mediation Conciliation Arbitration

15. Grievance Processes Student Advocate Student Ombud

16. 3. Agreement on a Plan for Resolution The desired outcome of the process is to make a plan for resolution. The plan: Can be presented as a proposal that is realistic and flexible Can be referred to as a possible resolution Needs to include review and revision Annual Review of Progress

17. 4.Sharing Perceptions Understanding the other person’s point of view is a key in conflict resolution Understanding does not mean agreeing with, approving of, or even accepting what he or she says. It only means that you are registering their view point Can have a powerful effect on minimising negative emotions “You feel like you’ve reached your limit, is that right?”

18. 4.Sharing Perceptions EXPLORE – to unfold the difficulty in more depth Ask general open-ended questions that encourage the person to open up e.g. “How do you see it all?” Ask specific questions that will give you significant pieces of information

19. 5.Responding Responding to a complaint or attack on you. Aim of speaker: to tell you that you are the problem. Task of listener: to let them know that you’ve taken in what they are saying and to defuse the strong emotion

20. 5.Responding Don’t defend yourself initially Deal with their emotions first – Make sure they know they are being heard – name the emotions Acknowledge their side – register their viewpoint e.g. “I can see , if you think that was my attitude, why you are so angry.”

21. 6.Defining Objectives Define objectives in specific, practical and achievable terms Include some basic objectives. Focus on future action How would you like it to be? Is that possible? What would it take?

22. 7.Exploring Option(s) What are the range of options available? Brainstorm ideas and possibilities Record the options (e.g. visually)

23. 8.Selecting Option(s) Negotiation is most effectively undertaken by talking possibilities and proposals in language that is tentative e.g. possibly, perhaps, could, might Apply an ‘if then process’ “If we select this option, then…..”

24. 9.Implementing Both parties must clearly and precisely understand: what has been agreed what they are required to do what they can expect from the other person Plan who will do what, where and by when Document this information

25. 10.Evaluating and Reviewing It is useful to arrange a follow-up meeting or series of meetings to monitor and evaluate whether the proposal has been implemented effectively

26. 10.Evaluating and Reviewing If the proposal has not worked, then reasons need to be identified. It is useful to consider the options again or review the implementation and revise it

27. Feedback Evaluation Thank you from the Learning and Teaching Unit (LTU)

  • Login