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State of the Schools March 21, 2011. Mr. Jefferey Lampert Superintendent Strongsville City Schools. Mission :.

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State of the Schools March 21, 2011

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State of the schools march 21 2011

State of the SchoolsMarch 21, 2011


State of the schools march 21 2011

Mr. JeffereyLampertSuperintendent

Strongsville City Schools


State of the schools march 21 2011

Mission:

The mission of the Strongsville City Schools, an “Excellent” school district with a tradition of nationally recognized students and staff, is to ensure all students reach their fullest potential, through challenging curriculum and activities, provided by a highly qualified, motivated staff, in a safe, supportive environment, with up-to-date facilities and technology - in partnership with the community.


State of the schools march 21 2011

District Goals:

Our all encompassing goal is to maintain our excellence

in the face of continuing financial uncertainty.

  • Student Achievement

  • Preserving Academic Excellence

  • Fiscal Stability

  • & Responsibility

3) Update Strategic Plan


State of the schools march 21 2011

Student Achievement

  • Ohio Improvement Process

2) Response To Intervention

3) State Report Card

9 years of excellence


State of the schools march 21 2011

Mr. John KrupinskiAssistant Superintendent

For Human Resources &

Staff Development

Strongsville City Schools


State of the schools march 21 2011

Fiscal Stability

& Responsibility

Mr. William Parkinson

Treasurer

Strongsville City Schools


State of the schools march 21 2011

House Bill 920 & Property TaxesState FundingProactive Fiscal DecisionsUncontrollable Factors Current Finances


House bill 920 property taxes

House Bill 920 & Property Taxes

  • Property tax rates are defined as mills where 1 mill = 1/10th of $0.01 or $1.00 of taxation for every $1,000 in property value.

  • Property taxes have historically accounted for 71% of the total General Fund Revenue budget.

  • This line item, by law, never changes regardless of property values, unless an additional levy is passed.


House bill 920 property taxes1

House Bill 920 & Property Taxes

  • §12.02 of the Ohio Constitution

  • “With respect to each voted tax authorized to be levied by each taxing district, the amount of taxes imposed by such tax against all land and improvements thereon . . . shall be reduced in order that the amount charged for collection against all land and improvements . . . in the current year . . . equals the amount charged for collection against such land and improvements in the preceding year.”


House bill 920 property taxes2

House Bill 920 & Property Taxes

  • No matter if property values rise or decline, the amount of dollars generated from any particular levy remains exactly the same.

  • Since 1976, the year HB 920 was enacted, property values have grown by 751%.


House bill 920 property taxes3

House Bill 920 & Property Taxes

  • In 1976, property values were about $169,452,000 and generated about $5,300,000 from 31.8 mills

  • Today, property values are estimated to be $1,442,739,000 and generate $5,300,000 from 31.8 mills.


House bill 920 property taxes4

House Bill 920 & Property Taxes

  • 34 levy attempts since 1985 (including debt & permanent improvement requests).

  • 12 have passed (35%)

  • 22 have failed (65%)

  • 30% of Cuyahoga County School Districts are on the May ballot; 70% project a deficit by 2014.


House bill 920 property taxes5

House Bill 920 & Property Taxes

  • No other public organization’s primary revenue source is governed by these set of rules.

  • Not cities, not townships, not villages, not counties, not even the State.

  • These organizations may receive some funding from property taxes, but none are dependent on it as schools are as a primary revenue source.


State funding

State Funding

  • Is governed primarily by two factors, enrollment and property values.

  • As enrollment rises and falls, state funding rises and falls.

  • As property values rises and falls, state funding falls and rises (contradicts HB 920; referred to as “phantom revenue”).


State funding1

State Funding

  • As property values rise, the State assumes the District has become more property “wealthy” and is/should be less reliant on State Funding

  • Since 1976, property values have grown by 751%.

  • The result? Our school district is “less reliant” on State funding.


State funding2

State Funding

  • FY10, the State transitioned from SF-3 funding model to Ohio Evidence Based Model funding model.

  • Under this new funding model, the State took into consideration “proven” educational criteria and funded those areas. As a result, funding to schools was declared “adequate”.

  • The new funding model still makes a distinction between “wealthy” Districts and “poor” Districts (i.e. those declared wealthy must rely more on local funding and less on state funding).


State funding3

State Funding

  • What does this mean for Strongsville?

  • Strongsville is considered to be property “wealthy”, and therefore, under the funding model, the Strongsville resident must provide the majority of funding.

  • As a result of the funding model, the State’s share of funding responsibility in Strongsville is far less than that of the local property owner.


State funding4

State Funding

  • Since the last levy was passed, funding from the State has declined by 10%.

  • Part of the District’s planning process is being prepared as best as possible for further funding cuts that may be proposed and adopted as part of the next State biennium budget.


State funding governor s proposal

State Funding (Governor's Proposal)

FY12FY13

  • Foundation Funding Formula0%0%

    • appears to continue as constituted under HB1

  • Tangible Reimbursements(-)37%(-)34%

    • proposing to accelerate phase-out of payments

  • Transportation(-)5%(+)1%


Proactive fiscal decisions compensation

Proactive Fiscal Decisions (compensation)

  • District bid out its insurance plan

  • 133 Employees RIF’d / retired and not replaced

    • includes the closing of Allen Elementary

  • OAPSE negotiations in FY10

  • SEA negotiations in FY11

    • savings effective beginning July 1


Proactive fiscal decisions compensation1

Proactive Fiscal Decisions (compensation)

  • 3 year salary freezefor all employee groups

    • applies to fiscal years ‘08 / ‘09 / ‘10

    • SEA / Admin through 2012 / OAPSE through 2011

  • Reduction of W/C premiums through better risk management

  • Eliminate Camp Y-Noah / D.C. trips / Outdoor Education

  • TOTAL SAVINGS

    $5,094,900


Proactive fiscal decisions purchased services

Proactive Fiscal Decisions (purchased services)

  • Closing of Allen Elementary (fixed costs)

  • Reduction of liability insurance premiums through better risk management

  • Reduction of non-transportation costs / non-special ed. costs / employee travel costs

  • TOTAL SAVINGS

    $987,900


Proactive fiscal decisions

Proactive Fiscal Decisions

  • Reduction of instructional & library supplies

  • Reduction of repair & maintenance / facilities / vehicle / equipment supplies

  • Reduction / delay of textbook adoptions

  • TOTAL SAVINGS

    $586,300


Proactive fiscal decisions1

Proactive Fiscal Decisions

  • Eliminate / delay school bus purchases

  • Eliminate / delay technology hardware / software upgrades

  • Eliminate / delay facility upgrades & maintenance

  • TOTAL SAVINGS

    $874,200


Proactive fiscal decisions2

Proactive Fiscal Decisions

  • Eliminate SCS-TV

  • Closing of Allen Elementary (costs not associated with purchase services or supplies)

  • TOTAL SAVINGS

    $262,600


Proactive fiscal decisions3

Proactive Fiscal Decisions

  • TOTAL REDUCTIONS FROM ALL CATEGORIES

    $7,805,900


Uncontrollable factors

Uncontrollable Factors

  • Declining collection rate ($0.96 / $1.00)

  • Rising delinquencies

  • Ohio Constitution keeps school funding flat regardless of valuation changes

  • Tangible Tax eliminated under HB66


Uncontrollable factors1

Uncontrollable Factors

  • Declining enrollment

  • Declining State funding

    • specific impact from recent budget proposal unknown

  • Declining interest earnings (5.18% to 0.11%)

  • Bottom line => the District does not have any ability to change its revenue and is completely subject to outside influences


Uncontrollable factors2

Uncontrollable Factors

  • Increasing utility costs

  • Increasing diesel fuel costs

  • Increasing costs due to State mandates

  • Increasing fees paid to County


Current finances fy11 budget

Current Finances – Fy11 Budget

REVENUE

EXPENDITURES


Current finances fy11 budget1

Current Finances – Fy11 Budget

ENDING CASH BALANCE

PROJECTED BALANCES


Thank you

Thank You

Strongsville City School District

State of the Schools Address

March 2011


State of the schools march 21 2011

Important District

Financial Information:

www.strongnet.org


State of the schools march 21 2011

Strategic Plan

  • Initiated in 2006

  • Key to Decision Making

  • Process Oriented

  • Builds Partnerships with Stakeholders

  • Comprehensive Overview

  • Curriculum Teaching/Learning

  • Facilities Operations

  • Technology Student Activities

  • Communications


State of the schools march 21 2011

Strategic Plan

  • Status Review

  • Reviewed Initial Plan (2006)

  • Conducting Internal Audits by Dept.

  • Moving Forward

  • Re-evaluating District Priorities

  • Working Document

  • Proactive vs Reactive

  • Collaboration with Stakeholders /

  • Community Involvement


State of the schools march 21 2011

Mr. Mark DonnallyDirector of Business Services & Technology

Strongsville City Schools


State of the schools march 21 2011

Facilities

Aside from our employees, our facilities are our most important asset.

832,149 sq. ft. Educational Space,

Plus BOE, Transportation, P.S.

Most built in ‘50s & ‘60s, with 22 additions.


State of the schools march 21 2011

Facilities

  • Preventive Maintenance

  • Unplanned Maintenance

  • Planned Repair

  • Capital Replacement

The more $ spent on preventive

maintenance, the less spent on other

costs, as well as lower utilities.


State of the schools march 21 2011

Facilities

As the financial situation has become more challenging, we have made some tough decisions.

General fund custodial & maintenance budgets decreased.

Permanent Improvement fund used for capital expenditures.


State of the schools march 21 2011

Five Year Plan

PI fund provides $1,000,000 for capital expenditures each year.

PI funds used for facilities, buses, technology needs.

To balance district’s needs, we must use common sense, ‘biggest bang for the buck’.


State of the schools march 21 2011

Strongsville High School Major Projects List

Project:

Rational:

FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 Beyond

Replace windows in 4 classrooms

Water intrusion

$ 1,591

Hall doors for ASAP

Education need

Clean univent coils 700s/800s

$ 21,410

No heat

$ 750,000

Replace roof sections

In need

Door replacement

Failing doors

$ 5,000

$ 5,000

$ 5,000

$ 7,502

Catan Stadium heating

RR & vending

$ 20,000

Parking lot repaving

Cracks & holes

$ 125,000

Duct cleaning

Overdue

$ 25,000

Replace clocks

Not working

$ 19,151

Fire suppression fix

Fire inspection

$ 2,125

Back flow preventer upgrade

$ 2,450

Out of order

$ 69,229

$ 755,000

$ 0

$ 5,000

$ 5,000

$ 170,000

Totals


State of the schools march 21 2011

Major Projects List Summary

Project:

FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 Beyond

Strongsville High School

$ 69,229

$ 755,000

$ 5,000

$ 5,000

$ 170,000

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 915,000

$ 9,500

$ 75,000

Albion Middle School

$ 67,706

$ 13,030

$ 663,000

$ 90,000

$ 0

$ 265,000

$ 0

Center Middle School

Chapman Elementary School

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 23,500

$ 485,000

$ 71,225

Drake Elementary School

$ 0

$ 69,800

$ 750,000

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

Kinsner Elementary School

$ 0

$ 0

$ 160,000

$ 0

$ 402

$ 0

Muraski Elementary School

$ 0

$ 135,000

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

Surrarrer Elementary School

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 20,000

$ 832

$ 0

$ 25,000

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 298,000

Whitney Elementary School

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 410,000

$ 465,000

Zellers Elementary School

$ 3,800

$ 6,215

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 160,000

Early Learning Preschool

Support Services Complex

$ 364,120

$ 0

$ 24,500

$ 50,000

$ 315,000

$ 1,715,000

Board of Education

$ 38,500

$ 0

$ 15,000

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

District Wide

$ 224,000

$ 245,000

$ 49,000

$ 165,000

$ 260,000

$ 160,000

$ 953,859

$ 4,858,000

$ 1,000,000

$ 751,500

$ 1,248,500

$ 999,500


State of the schools march 21 2011

Five Year Plan

Next five years = OK, 2015 to 2025?

Reconvene Facilities Committee, Present a Strategic Plan for Facilities.


State of the schools march 21 2011

Additional Priorities

  • Partnership with the City

  • - Quality of life

2) Communicating with Stakeholders

3) Use of Technology to Enhance

Student Achievement

4) Professional Development for

our Staff

5) Collaborative Approach to

Decision Making


State of the schools march 21 2011

Management of Change

CHANGE

Vision

Organizational

& Personal

Capacity Bldg.

Skills Bldg.

Culture Bldg.

Incentives

Resources

Action Plan

CONFUSION

Capacity Bldg.

Skills Bldg.

Culture Bldg.

Incentives

Resources

Action Plan

ANXIETY

Incentives

Resources

Action Plan

Vision

Organizational

& Personal

RESISTANCE

Vision

Organizational

& Personal

Capacity Bldg.

Skills Bldg.

Culture Bldg.

Resources

Action Plan

FRUSTRATION

Vision

Organizational

& Personal

Capacity Bldg.

Skills Bldg.

Culture Bldg.

Incentives

Action Plan

FALSE STARTS

Vision

Organizational

& Personal

Capacity Bldg.

Skills Bldg.

Culture Bldg.

Incentives

Resources


State of the schools march 21 2011

Killer Phrase

n. 1. a knee-jerk response that squelches new ideas;

2. a threat to innovation

  • “It won’t work”

  • “Let’s form a committee”

  • “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”

  • “The boss will never go for it”

  • “Put it in writing”

  • “We don’t have time”

  • “They won’t accept it”

  • “It’s too old”

  • “You don’t understand

  • our problem”

  • “We’re too small for that”

  • “It sounds good, but …”

  • “Here we go again”

  • “Don’t move too fast”

  • “I don’t see the connection”

  • “It’ll just mean more work”

  • “I have a problem with that”

  • “We don’t have the training”

  • “You gotta be kidding”


State of the schools march 21 2011

Keeping things inperspective.


State of the schools march 21 2011

[email protected]


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