Reporting Juvenile Crime

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Clarify what to count as a Juvenile ArrestReview the process of compiling the monthly Juvenile ASR reportClarify the difference between Race and Ethnic OriginReview Police Dispositions of Juveniles Under 16 Years of Age. Objectives. 2. ?For UCR purposes a juvenile arrest iscounted when t

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Reporting Juvenile Crime

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1. Reporting Juvenile Crime Measuring Juvenile Criminal Behavior Presented by: Zak Morton Created: December 14, 2009 1

2. Clarify what to count as a Juvenile Arrest Review the process of compiling the monthly Juvenile ASR report Clarify the difference between Race and Ethnic Origin Review Police Dispositions of Juveniles Under 16 Years of Age Objectives 2 A recent review of juvenile arrest data submitted through the UCR crime reporting program has identified some data quality issues with regard to what agencies are reporting as a juvenile arrest. The purpose of this training is clarify the criteria for which a juvenile deposition qualifies as a juvenile arrest. Additionally, this training will review the ASR report compilation process, Clarify Race and Ethnic Origin Classifications, and review Police Dispositions of Juveniles Under 16 Years of Age. A recent review of juvenile arrest data submitted through the UCR crime reporting program has identified some data quality issues with regard to what agencies are reporting as a juvenile arrest. The purpose of this training is clarify the criteria for which a juvenile deposition qualifies as a juvenile arrest. Additionally, this training will review the ASR report compilation process, Clarify Race and Ethnic Origin Classifications, and review Police Dispositions of Juveniles Under 16 Years of Age.

3. “For UCR purposes a juvenile arrest is counted when the circumstances are such that if the individual was an adult, an arrest would have been made.” - Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Handbook Juvenile-Under 18 Years of Age FBI UCR Definition 3 The UCR reporting program requires law enforcement agencies to score a juvenile arrest when the circumstances are such that if the individual were an adult, an arrest would have been counted. Reporting agencies must score juvenile arrests opposite the classification of the offenses for which the juvenile was taken into custody. For example, if police arrested a juvenile for committing an offense of larceny, the agency must score the arrest opposite the larceny-theft classification on the ASR report, even though the technical charge is juvenile delinquency.The UCR reporting program requires law enforcement agencies to score a juvenile arrest when the circumstances are such that if the individual were an adult, an arrest would have been counted. Reporting agencies must score juvenile arrests opposite the classification of the offenses for which the juvenile was taken into custody. For example, if police arrested a juvenile for committing an offense of larceny, the agency must score the arrest opposite the larceny-theft classification on the ASR report, even though the technical charge is juvenile delinquency.

4. Statistics are being gathered to measure criminal activity, not court activity or formal arrests Measuring Criminal Activity 4 The definition of juvenile arrest in the UCR Handbook is broad and somewhat vague. The intent of the UCR program is to provide law enforcement agencies with the type of data that illustrate the extent of a crime problem. The Federal UCR program collects “arrest” statistics to provide demographic information on who is committing crimes, and is not intended to track court or formal arrest activity. The definition of juvenile arrest in the UCR Handbook is broad and somewhat vague. The intent of the UCR program is to provide law enforcement agencies with the type of data that illustrate the extent of a crime problem. The Federal UCR program collects “arrest” statistics to provide demographic information on who is committing crimes, and is not intended to track court or formal arrest activity.

5. Total number of persons “arrested”, cited, or summoned for all Part I and Part II crimes during a specified month Demographic characteristics of persons arrested (age, sex, race, and ethnic origin) The Juvenile ASR is designed to collect data on the number of persons arrested, not the number of charges lodged. What does the ASR Report collect? 5 The ASR provides a record of the total number of persons arrested, cited, or summoned for criminal acts in all part I and II crimes. It also furnishes personal characteristic data of arrestees – age, sex, race and ethnic origin, during a particular month. The Juvenile ASR form is designed to collect data on the number of persons arrested, not the number of charges lodged.The ASR provides a record of the total number of persons arrested, cited, or summoned for criminal acts in all part I and II crimes. It also furnishes personal characteristic data of arrestees – age, sex, race and ethnic origin, during a particular month. The Juvenile ASR form is designed to collect data on the number of persons arrested, not the number of charges lodged.

6. probable cause “taken into custody”, or issued an appearance ticket Components of a “Juvenile Arrest” 6 A recent review of New York State juvenile arrest data submitted through the UCR program identified some data quality issues with regard to what agencies are reporting as a juvenile arrest. To better clarify when a juvenile arrest should be counted on the ASR, DCJS has defined a juvenile arrest as any situation where a police officer has probable cause to believe that a juvenile committed a Part I or Part II UCR offense AND that the juvenile is either “taken into custody” or issued an appearance ticket.A recent review of New York State juvenile arrest data submitted through the UCR program identified some data quality issues with regard to what agencies are reporting as a juvenile arrest. To better clarify when a juvenile arrest should be counted on the ASR, DCJS has defined a juvenile arrest as any situation where a police officer has probable cause to believe that a juvenile committed a Part I or Part II UCR offense AND that the juvenile is either “taken into custody” or issued an appearance ticket.

7. “Taken into custody” means that the juvenile is no longer free to leave regardless of whether he or she is handcuffed placed in a police vehicle brought to a police station taken directly to Family Court or secure detention given an appearance ticket OR warned and released without further action “Taken Into Custody” 7 Being taken into police custody can happen several ways ranging from being handcuffed and placed in the back of a police vehicle, to being brought to a police station for questioning, or being issued an appearance ticket. The most commonly under-reported way of being “taken into custody” is being “warned and released without further action." It is important to include juveniles who are “warned and released” in monthly ASR Arrest reports to provide the most accurate depiction of juvenile criminal activity. The following examples illustrate circumstances where juveniles are taken into custody and warned and released that should be counted in the monthly ASR report.Being taken into police custody can happen several ways ranging from being handcuffed and placed in the back of a police vehicle, to being brought to a police station for questioning, or being issued an appearance ticket. The most commonly under-reported way of being “taken into custody” is being “warned and released without further action." It is important to include juveniles who are “warned and released” in monthly ASR Arrest reports to provide the most accurate depiction of juvenile criminal activity. The following examples illustrate circumstances where juveniles are taken into custody and warned and released that should be counted in the monthly ASR report.

8. Juvenile male is taken into police custody after he is observed shoplifting After questioning, the juvenile is warned by the police and released to his parents No formal charges are brought against the juvenile “Warned and Released” Example #1 8 In the first example, a juvenile male is taken into police custody after he is observed shoplifting (which is larceny theft a Part I crime). After questioning, the officer warns the juvenile, contacts the juvenile’s parents and releases the juvenile to them after explaining the circumstances and reiterating the warning. No formal charges are brought because the juvenile has no prior criminal history. In this situation, an arrest for larceny-theft should be counted on the Monthly Juvenile ASR report.In the first example, a juvenile male is taken into police custody after he is observed shoplifting (which is larceny theft a Part I crime). After questioning, the officer warns the juvenile, contacts the juvenile’s parents and releases the juvenile to them after explaining the circumstances and reiterating the warning. No formal charges are brought because the juvenile has no prior criminal history. In this situation, an arrest for larceny-theft should be counted on the Monthly Juvenile ASR report.

9. Juvenile is pulled over for speeding Vehicle search uncovers drug paraphernalia and a small quantity of marijuana Juvenile is detained by police until her legal guardian arrives at the scene Juvenile to the legal guardian with no formal charges are lodged “Warned and Released” Example #2 9 In the second example, a juvenile is pulled over by police for driving in excess of the posted speed limit. A search of the vehicle uncovers drug paraphernalia and a small quantity of marijuana. The juvenile is detained by police until her legal guardian arrives at the scene. Police confiscate and destroy the paraphernalia and marijuana and release the juvenile to her legal guardian. No formal charges are lodged against the juvenile. In this circumstance the police could arrest the juvenile for drug possession but instead decided to warn and release the juvenile to her legal guardian. The incident should be counted and scored as an arrest for drug possession on the monthly Juveniles ASR report, even though no formal arrest was made.In the second example, a juvenile is pulled over by police for driving in excess of the posted speed limit. A search of the vehicle uncovers drug paraphernalia and a small quantity of marijuana. The juvenile is detained by police until her legal guardian arrives at the scene. Police confiscate and destroy the paraphernalia and marijuana and release the juvenile to her legal guardian. No formal charges are lodged against the juvenile. In this circumstance the police could arrest the juvenile for drug possession but instead decided to warn and release the juvenile to her legal guardian. The incident should be counted and scored as an arrest for drug possession on the monthly Juveniles ASR report, even though no formal arrest was made.

10. If there is no probable cause, an arrest should NOT be counted on the ASR report. What is NOT a “juvenile arrest”? 10 Police contact with a juvenile where there is no probable cause to believe a UCR offense was committed should not be counted as an arrest.Police contact with a juvenile where there is no probable cause to believe a UCR offense was committed should not be counted as an arrest.

11. Teenagers in the town park after closing are instructed by police to leave. A juvenile taken into custody for his or her own protection, e.g., neglect cases. Follow-up contact with young offenders by officers for the purpose of determining the offender’s progress. Examples 11 Some examples of situations that should not be counted as arrests include the following situations: Teenagers in the town park after closing are instructed by police to leave. A juvenile taken into custody for his or her own protection, e.g., neglect cases, and Follow-up contact with young offenders by officers for the purpose of determining the offender’s progress.Some examples of situations that should not be counted as arrests include the following situations: Teenagers in the town park after closing are instructed by police to leave. A juvenile taken into custody for his or her own protection, e.g., neglect cases, and Follow-up contact with young offenders by officers for the purpose of determining the offender’s progress.

12. In New York State, “juvenile arrest” data from the ASR Report is the ONLY indicator of juvenile crime. Used to inform policy and funding decisions. Measure Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) Part of national data set Importance of ASR data 12 ASR data is very important because in New York State, “juvenile arrest” data from the ASR Report is the only regularly available indicator of juvenile crime. It is part of the national data set and is used to inform policy and funding decisions. Most importantly, juvenile arrest data from the ASR is used to measure Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC). DMC refers to a requirement for all states receiving Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Formula Grants to address “juvenile delinquency prevention efforts and system improvement efforts designed to reduce the disproportionate number of juvenile members of minority groups who come into contact with the juvenile justice system.” Receipt of federal grant money is contingent on the collection of Juvenile arrest data from the ASR.ASR data is very important because in New York State, “juvenile arrest” data from the ASR Report is the only regularly available indicator of juvenile crime. It is part of the national data set and is used to inform policy and funding decisions. Most importantly, juvenile arrest data from the ASR is used to measure Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC). DMC refers to a requirement for all states receiving Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Formula Grants to address “juvenile delinquency prevention efforts and system improvement efforts designed to reduce the disproportionate number of juvenile members of minority groups who come into contact with the juvenile justice system.” Receipt of federal grant money is contingent on the collection of Juvenile arrest data from the ASR.

13. Preparing the ASR Report Arrests of Juveniles Under 18 years of age 13 Preparing the ASR Report Arrests of Juveniles Under 18 years of agePreparing the ASR Report Arrests of Juveniles Under 18 years of age

14. 14 On the ASR, the total number of Arrestees Under 18 should be equal to the Race total and the Ethnic Origin total. It is important to note that Race and Ethnic Origin are separate categories. For example when a White, Non-Hispanic, 15 year old male is arrested for burglary, the arrest should be counted once under the Age of 15, once under the Race of White, and once under Non-Hispanic.On the ASR, the total number of Arrestees Under 18 should be equal to the Race total and the Ethnic Origin total. It is important to note that Race and Ethnic Origin are separate categories. For example when a White, Non-Hispanic, 15 year old male is arrested for burglary, the arrest should be counted once under the Age of 15, once under the Race of White, and once under Non-Hispanic.

15. The ASR Report counts the number of people arrested, not the number of charges lodged. Count People, Not Charges 15 Count People , Not Charges The ASR Report counts the number of individuals arrested. It does not count the total number of charges lodged. An arrestee may be charged with multiple offenses, but only the most serious charge is counted. UCR statistics are intended to assist law enforcement in the identifying crime problems. It is therefore important to record the offense counts as opposed to the findings of a court, coroner, jury, or the decision of a prosecutor.Count People , Not Charges The ASR Report counts the number of individuals arrested. It does not count the total number of charges lodged. An arrestee may be charged with multiple offenses, but only the most serious charge is counted. UCR statistics are intended to assist law enforcement in the identifying crime problems. It is therefore important to record the offense counts as opposed to the findings of a court, coroner, jury, or the decision of a prosecutor.

16. “If a person is arrested for multiple offenses that were committed simultaneously, only the offense highest in the hierarchy of UCR Crimes is counted.” The Hierarchy Rule 16 The Hierarchy Rule The Hierarchy rule states that if a person is arrested for multiple offenses that were committed simultaneously, only the offense highest in the hierarchy of UCR crimes is counted. Both Part 1 and Part 2 offenses are listed in hierarchical order on the Return A and ASR report forms.The Hierarchy Rule The Hierarchy rule states that if a person is arrested for multiple offenses that were committed simultaneously, only the offense highest in the hierarchy of UCR crimes is counted. Both Part 1 and Part 2 offenses are listed in hierarchical order on the Return A and ASR report forms.

17. Two women are arrested for breaking into a car dealership after closing hours (Burglary). They stole cash from the dealership’s office safe (Larceny-theft) and two new automobiles from the garage (Motor Vehicle Theft). What offense should be reported? Hierarchy Rule Example 17 To illustrate the Hierarchy Rule, consider the following example. Two women are arrested for breaking into a car dealership after closing hours (Burglary). They took the cash from the dealership’s office safe (Larceny-theft) and two new automobiles from the garage (Motor Vehicle Theft). What offense should be reported? Following the Hierarchy Rule, Burglary is the highest of the offenses, so ONLY an arrest for burglary should be counted on the Monthly ASR Report.To illustrate the Hierarchy Rule, consider the following example. Two women are arrested for breaking into a car dealership after closing hours (Burglary). They took the cash from the dealership’s office safe (Larceny-theft) and two new automobiles from the garage (Motor Vehicle Theft). What offense should be reported? Following the Hierarchy Rule, Burglary is the highest of the offenses, so ONLY an arrest for burglary should be counted on the Monthly ASR Report.

18. In a multiple offense incident where an arson occurs in conjunction with another Part I offense, report BOTH the top charge, AND the arson charge. Exception to the Hierarchy Rule 18 There is an exception to the Hierarchy Rule. In an incident where a person is arrested for multiple offenses where an arson occurs in conjunction with another Part I offense, BOTH the top charge and the arson charge are reported as arrests.There is an exception to the Hierarchy Rule. In an incident where a person is arrested for multiple offenses where an arson occurs in conjunction with another Part I offense, BOTH the top charge and the arson charge are reported as arrests.

19. A person may be arrested multiple times during a month for similar or different violations within a jurisdiction. When there is a separation of time between arrests, the agency must score each arrest separately. Separation of Time and Place 19 Separation of Time and Place A person may be arrested multiple times during a month for similar or different violations within a jurisdiction. When there is a separation of time between arrests, the agency must score each arrest separately. Separation of Time and Place A person may be arrested multiple times during a month for similar or different violations within a jurisdiction. When there is a separation of time between arrests, the agency must score each arrest separately.

20. Man and woman parked in secluded location Gunman shoots and kills man, abducts woman, drives her across town and rapes her Two separate crimes – Homicide and Rape Hierarchy rule is not used due to separation of time and place Separation of Time and Place Example 20 For example, a man and woman were parked at a secluded location. A gunman surprised them and shot and killed the man when he resisted. The gunman abducted the woman and drove across town to a secluded location where he forcibly raped her. The police arrested the perpetrator at the scene. This incident is an example of two separate crimes against the person – Criminal Homicide and Forcible Rape. The Hierarchy Rule does not apply because there is a separation of time and place between the two crimes.For example, a man and woman were parked at a secluded location. A gunman surprised them and shot and killed the man when he resisted. The gunman abducted the woman and drove across town to a secluded location where he forcibly raped her. The police arrested the perpetrator at the scene. This incident is an example of two separate crimes against the person – Criminal Homicide and Forcible Rape. The Hierarchy Rule does not apply because there is a separation of time and place between the two crimes.

21. Classifying Race and Ethnic Origin 21 Classifying Race and Ethnic Origin To get a better handle on classifying Race and Ethnic Origin on the ASR report, the next section will review the definitions for each race and ethnic origin.Classifying Race and Ethnic Origin To get a better handle on classifying Race and Ethnic Origin on the ASR report, the next section will review the definitions for each race and ethnic origin.

22. Races: Black, White, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian or Pacific Islander Ethnic Origin: Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Race and Ethnic Origin 22 The UCR program uses four race classifications and two Ethnic Origin classifications. The racial categories used in the UCR Program were adopted from the Statistical Policy Handbook (1978) published by the Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, U.S. Department of Commerce. These include Black, White, American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Asian or Pacific Islander. Many law enforcement agencies mistakenly count Hispanic as a 5th racial designation. Hispanic is NOT a racial category, rather it is an ethnic origin. Law Enforcement agencies should indicate both a Race and an Ethnic Origin classifications for each arrestee.The UCR program uses four race classifications and two Ethnic Origin classifications. The racial categories used in the UCR Program were adopted from the Statistical Policy Handbook (1978) published by the Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, U.S. Department of Commerce. These include Black, White, American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Asian or Pacific Islander. Many law enforcement agencies mistakenly count Hispanic as a 5th racial designation. Hispanic is NOT a racial category, rather it is an ethnic origin. Law Enforcement agencies should indicate both a Race and an Ethnic Origin classifications for each arrestee.

23. White: having origins in any of the original people of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. Classifying Race 23 A racial designation of White refers to a person who has origins in any of the original people of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. It is noteworthy that what is loosely referred to as the White race includes many persons of dark skin color.A racial designation of White refers to a person who has origins in any of the original people of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. It is noteworthy that what is loosely referred to as the White race includes many persons of dark skin color.

24. Black: having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Classifying Race 24 A racial designation of Black refers to a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.A racial designation of Black refers to a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.

25. American Indian or Alaskan Native: Having origins in any of the original peoples of North America and who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition. Classifying Race 25 A racial designation of American Indian or Alaskan Native refers to a person having origins in any of the original people s of North America and who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition. A racial designation of American Indian or Alaskan Native refers to a person having origins in any of the original people s of North America and who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.

26. Asian or Pacific Islander: Having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or Pacific Islands. This includes, China, India, Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands, and Samoa. Classifying Race 26 A racial designation of Asian or Pacific Islander refers to a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands. This area includes, for example, China, India, Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands, and Samoa. A racial designation of Asian or Pacific Islander refers to a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands. This area includes, for example, China, India, Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands, and Samoa.

27. Hispanic: A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish speaking culture, regardless of race. Non-Hispanic: All other people. Ethnic Origin 27 Ethnic Origin refers to whether an arrestee is Hispanic or Non-Hispanic. A Hispanic is a person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish speaking culture, regardless of race. All other people are Non-Hispanic.Ethnic Origin refers to whether an arrestee is Hispanic or Non-Hispanic. A Hispanic is a person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish speaking culture, regardless of race. All other people are Non-Hispanic.

28. Determining Race and Ethnic Origin of Arrestees Use “best judgment” to determine the race AND ethnic origin of the person arrested. 28 The key to determining race and ethnic origin of arrestees is to use your own best judgment. Remember that both Race and Ethnic Origin must be classified for each arrestee. DCJS will contact agencies that do not provide this essential information.The key to determining race and ethnic origin of arrestees is to use your own best judgment. Remember that both Race and Ethnic Origin must be classified for each arrestee. DCJS will contact agencies that do not provide this essential information.

29. A 15 year old male is arrested after leaving a gas station without paying for the gas he pumped into his car. When police arrest him, he identifies himself as Puerto Rican. How should the arrestee be classified with regard to Race AND Ethnic Origin? Classifying Race and Ethnic Origin Example 29 Classifying Race and Ethnic Origin Example A 15 year old male is arrested after leaving a gas station without paying for the gas he pumped into his car. When police arrest him, he identifies himself as Puerto Rican. How should the arrestee be classified with regard to Race AND Ethnic Origin? Because the arrestee identified himself as Puerto Rican, the officer should report the ethnic origin as Hispanic. People of Puerto Rican lineage can be a mix of White (European/Spanish), Native American, and African ancestry. If there is no apparent tribal affiliation, the officer can eliminate Native American as a choice. Using his best judgment, the officer must determine if the arrestee is white or black.Classifying Race and Ethnic Origin Example A 15 year old male is arrested after leaving a gas station without paying for the gas he pumped into his car. When police arrest him, he identifies himself as Puerto Rican. How should the arrestee be classified with regard to Race AND Ethnic Origin? Because the arrestee identified himself as Puerto Rican, the officer should report the ethnic origin as Hispanic. People of Puerto Rican lineage can be a mix of White (European/Spanish), Native American, and African ancestry. If there is no apparent tribal affiliation, the officer can eliminate Native American as a choice. Using his best judgment, the officer must determine if the arrestee is white or black.

30. ALWAYS indicate the race and ethnic origin of the person arrested! Please do NOT leave either race and ethnic origin blank! Use Your Best Judgment! 30 When deciding on race and ethnic origin classifications, the rule of thumb is to use your best judgment. ALWAYS indicate a race and ethnic origin for an arrestee regardless of any uncertainty. If you leave Race or Ethnic Origin blank, DCJS will call you back and ask you to provide this information. The collection of demographic information is important because it helps the state address DMC, a core requirement for Formula Grant funding under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act. Please use your best judgment and save time by filling out the ASR as completely as possible.When deciding on race and ethnic origin classifications, the rule of thumb is to use your best judgment. ALWAYS indicate a race and ethnic origin for an arrestee regardless of any uncertainty. If you leave Race or Ethnic Origin blank, DCJS will call you back and ask you to provide this information. The collection of demographic information is important because it helps the state address DMC, a core requirement for Formula Grant funding under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act. Please use your best judgment and save time by filling out the ASR as completely as possible.

31. Juvenile Disposition Data Persons Under 16 Years of Age 31 Juvenile Disposition Data Persons Under 16 Years of AgeJuvenile Disposition Data Persons Under 16 Years of Age

32. Police Disposition of Juveniles 32 The final segment of this training will review the block at the end of the ASR report which is used for the purpose of collecting data concerning the law enforcement dispositions of juveniles who are taken into custody or arrested.The final segment of this training will review the block at the end of the ASR report which is used for the purpose of collecting data concerning the law enforcement dispositions of juveniles who are taken into custody or arrested.

33. NYS Definition – Under 16 Years of Age National Definition - Under 18 Years of Age State vs. National Definitions 33 The reporting agency must use NY state age definitions of juveniles in completing the Police Disposition of Juveniles form. NY state defines Juvenile as anyone under 16 years of age. ONLY include juvenile arrests of persons under 16 years of age in the Police Disposition of Juveniles. The reporting agency must use NY state age definitions of juveniles in completing the Police Disposition of Juveniles form. NY state defines Juvenile as anyone under 16 years of age. ONLY include juvenile arrests of persons under 16 years of age in the Police Disposition of Juveniles.

34. Only report the disposition of those juveniles under 16 that were reported on the ASR form Do NOT include the disposition of those juveniles that did not commit a UCR offense The total number of dispositions should be equal to the total number of reported arrests of persons under 16 years of age on the ASR form Reconciling Juvenile Dispositions with the Juvenile ASR form 34 Reconciling Juvenile Dispositions with the Juvenile ASR form Only report the disposition of those juveniles under 16 that were reported on the ASR form. Do NOT include the disposition of those juveniles where police intervention occurred for a non UCR defined offense. The total number of dispositions should be equal to the total number of reported arrests of persons under 16 years of age on the ASR form. An exception to this occurs ONLY when the number of dispositions “Referred to Other Police Agency” is greater than the number of arrests reported on the ASR. In this disposition, the reporting agency is taking juveniles into custody for the purpose of referring them to another police agency that will subsequently report these arrests. Reconciling Juvenile Dispositions with the Juvenile ASR form Only report the disposition of those juveniles under 16 that were reported on the ASR form. Do NOT include the disposition of those juveniles where police intervention occurred for a non UCR defined offense. The total number of dispositions should be equal to the total number of reported arrests of persons under 16 years of age on the ASR form. An exception to this occurs ONLY when the number of dispositions “Referred to Other Police Agency” is greater than the number of arrests reported on the ASR. In this disposition, the reporting agency is taking juveniles into custody for the purpose of referring them to another police agency that will subsequently report these arrests.

35. 1. Handled Within Department and Released 2. Referred to Juvenile Court or Probation 3. Referred to Welfare Agency 4. Referred to Other Police Agency 5. Referred to Criminal or Adult Court Law Enforcement Interventions 35 Law Enforcement Interventions An adult arrestee is usually held for prosecution for some charge or is released for future handling in court. However, depending the seriousness of the offense and the offender’s prior criminal record, a juvenile may be warned by the police and released to parents, relatives, friends or guardians. Juveniles may also be referred to the probation department or some other branch of the juvenile court, to welfare agencies, to other law enforcement agencies, or in the case of serious offenders, to criminal or adult court by waiver of the juvenile court.Law Enforcement Interventions An adult arrestee is usually held for prosecution for some charge or is released for future handling in court. However, depending the seriousness of the offense and the offender’s prior criminal record, a juvenile may be warned by the police and released to parents, relatives, friends or guardians. Juveniles may also be referred to the probation department or some other branch of the juvenile court, to welfare agencies, to other law enforcement agencies, or in the case of serious offenders, to criminal or adult court by waiver of the juvenile court.

36. Juvenile Under 16 years of age Arrested, but not referred to family court No formal charge filed against the juvenile 1. Handled within Department & Released 36 1. Handled within Department and released Police take many juveniles into custody or arrest them for committing a violation , but make no referral to juvenile court and do not file formal charges. In most cases the juvenile is warned by the police and released, frequently to parents relatives or friends. Reporting agencies must enter such cases on line 1 in the Police Disposition of Juveniles breakdown box. Agencies must remember to score an arrest on the ASR form. If a juvenile fits the following criteria, an arrest should be scored on the ASR report. 1) Under 16 years of age 2) Arrested, but not referred to family court 3) No formal charge filed against the juvenile1. Handled within Department and released Police take many juveniles into custody or arrest them for committing a violation , but make no referral to juvenile court and do not file formal charges. In most cases the juvenile is warned by the police and released, frequently to parents relatives or friends. Reporting agencies must enter such cases on line 1 in the Police Disposition of Juveniles breakdown box. Agencies must remember to score an arrest on the ASR form. If a juvenile fits the following criteria, an arrest should be scored on the ASR report. 1) Under 16 years of age 2) Arrested, but not referred to family court 3) No formal charge filed against the juvenile

37. Include all Under-16 Juveniles referred to probation department another person or agency a group within jurisdiction of Family Court 2. Referred to Juvenile Court or Probation 37 2. Referred to Juvenile Court or Probation Reporting agencies must enter on line 2 the number of juveniles arrested and referred to the probation department or other individual, agency, or group working within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court. If a juvenile is arrested and referred more than once during the month, the agency must count each referral just as it would score each arrest for an adult. Dispositions where a juvenile is referred to Juvenile Court or Probation should include all Under-16 juveniles referred to a probation department, another person or agency, or a group within jurisdiction of Family Court.2. Referred to Juvenile Court or Probation Reporting agencies must enter on line 2 the number of juveniles arrested and referred to the probation department or other individual, agency, or group working within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court. If a juvenile is arrested and referred more than once during the month, the agency must count each referral just as it would score each arrest for an adult. Dispositions where a juvenile is referred to Juvenile Court or Probation should include all Under-16 juveniles referred to a probation department, another person or agency, or a group within jurisdiction of Family Court.

38. Include juveniles referred to welfare agencies rather than family court or probation. Welfare agencies can be public or private. Examples: Local Boys and Girls Club, Police Athletic League, or local Dept. of Social Services. 3. Referred to Welfare Agency 38 3. Referred to Welfare Agency The rules for completing line 2 also apply to line 3 except that the police refer the youth to a welfare agency either public or private, rather than to juvenile court or the probation department. Some examples of welfare agencies include Local Boys and Girls Club, a Police Athletic League, or a local Department of Social Services.3. Referred to Welfare Agency The rules for completing line 2 also apply to line 3 except that the police refer the youth to a welfare agency either public or private, rather than to juvenile court or the probation department. Some examples of welfare agencies include Local Boys and Girls Club, a Police Athletic League, or a local Department of Social Services.

39. Include Juveniles who 1. Are arrested at request of another law enforcement agency 2. Committed crime in one jurisdiction but reside in another and turned over to home jurisdiction for handling These arrests should NOT be counted on the ASR report. 4. Referred to Other Police Agency 39 4. Referred to Other Police Agency In most instances entries opposite line 4 include (1) juveniles arrested by a department at the request of another law enforcement agency, and (2) juveniles who committed crimes in one jurisdiction but reside in another and are turned over for handling to their home jurisdiction. Although juveniles taken into custody for committing a crime in another jurisdiction must be included in the disposition portion of this form, they must be excluded from the arrest figures on the ASR Under 18 form. 4. Referred to Other Police Agency In most instances entries opposite line 4 include (1) juveniles arrested by a department at the request of another law enforcement agency, and (2) juveniles who committed crimes in one jurisdiction but reside in another and are turned over for handling to their home jurisdiction. Although juveniles taken into custody for committing a crime in another jurisdiction must be included in the disposition portion of this form, they must be excluded from the arrest figures on the ASR Under 18 form.

40. Include any Under-16 Juveniles referred to adult court for the juvenile offender process 5. Referred to Criminal or Adult Court 40 5. Referred to Criminal or Adult Court NYS Statue permits the waiving of juveniles for trial to criminal or adult court as adults. The reporting agency must enter the number of juveniles referred or waived to adult court on line 5 and not on line 2. Even if subsequent judicial actions transfer the case to another agency or court, the reporting agency must score the initial referral on this form.5. Referred to Criminal or Adult Court NYS Statue permits the waiving of juveniles for trial to criminal or adult court as adults. The reporting agency must enter the number of juveniles referred or waived to adult court on line 5 and not on line 2. Even if subsequent judicial actions transfer the case to another agency or court, the reporting agency must score the initial referral on this form.

41. DCJS has discontinued collecting data on Runaways. Unnecessary to report data for juveniles taken into custody as runaways, truants, or curfew and loitering law violators. Discontinuation of Runaways 41 Discontinuation of Runaways DCJS is no longer collecting data on Runaways. It is no longer necessary to report data for juveniles taken into custody as runaways, truants, or curfew and loitering law violators. Discontinuation of Runaways DCJS is no longer collecting data on Runaways. It is no longer necessary to report data for juveniles taken into custody as runaways, truants, or curfew and loitering law violators.

42. DCJS will call your agency to verify the accuracy of data that deviates from reported norms. Follow-Up on Inconsistent Data 42 Follow-up on inconsistent data DCJS will be calling agencies to verify data when it deviates from reported norms. This will enable DCJS to provide the most accurate crime data and serves as a check against data entry errors.Follow-up on inconsistent data DCJS will be calling agencies to verify data when it deviates from reported norms. This will enable DCJS to provide the most accurate crime data and serves as a check against data entry errors.

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