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Welcome to SPIN Focused Innovation Workshop. Facilitated by. Berge Boyadjian, M.S. SM Founder & Improvement Catalyst Knowledge Capture and Transfer. Expect Great Outcomes . Have fun Learn Six Thinking Hats Focused Innovation Workshop Apply

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welcome to spin focused innovation workshop

Welcome toSPIN Focused Innovation Workshop

Facilitated by

Berge Boyadjian, M.S. SM

Founder & Improvement Catalyst

Knowledge Capture and Transfer

expect great outcomes
Expect Great Outcomes
  • Have fun
  • Learn
    • Six Thinking Hats
    • Focused Innovation Workshop
  • Apply
    • Six Thinking Hats approach to improve the quality and productivity of your future meetings
    • Focused Innovation Workshop to generate innovative improvement ideas for a specific software process in this workshop and other areas in the future
  • After the workshop use the tools on your own successfully

Cartoon is from the book “Create Fun @ Work”by Berge Boyadjian and Ron Paul, published by KCT, Long Beach, CA, 1999

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

agenda
Agenda
  • Organize into groups
  • Introduce Six Thinking Hats
  • Apply Six Thinking Hats
  • Introduce Focused Innovation Workshop (FIW)
  • Select an element of software process
  • Apply FIW process
  • Share and prioritize results

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

workshop rules applied to enable free flowing of creative ideas
Workshop Rules Applied To Enable Free Flowing ofCreative Ideas
  • Have fun! - it decreases stress; improves creativity, cooperation, and communication
  • All are strongly encouraged and are expected to participate to reap the benefits
  • Stay focused - with the help of each of the participants, facilitator and “THE BALLS”
  • No criticism or use of innovation “killer phrases” * during idea generation
  • Build on each other’s ideas
  • Wild ideas are encouraged

* - Killer Phrases are attached for reference

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

killer phrases are not used during idea generation
Killer Phrases Are Not Used During Idea Generation*

21. "The boss will never go for it."

22. "It\'s too far ahead of the times."

23. . . . laughter. . .

24. . . . suppressed laughter. . .

25. . . . condescending grin. . .

26. . . . dirty looks. . .

27. "Don\'t fight city hall!"

28. "I\'m the one who gets paid to think."

29. "What will people say?"

30. "Get a committee to look into that."

31. "If it ain\'t broke, don\'t fix it."

32. "You have got to be kidding."

33. "No!"

34. "We\'ve always done it this way."

35. "It\'s all right in theory. . . but. . ."

36. "Be practical!"

37. "Do you realize the paperwork it will create?"

38. "Because I said so."

39. "I\'ll get back to you."

40. . . . silence. . .

1. "Yes, but. . . "

2. "We tried that before."

3. "That\'s irrelevant."

4. "We haven\'t got the manpower."

5. "Obviously, you misread my request."

6. "Don\'t rock the boat!"

7. "The boss (or competition) will eat you alive."

8. "Don\'t waste time thinking."

9. "Great idea, but not for us."

10. "It\'ll never fly."

11. "Don\'t be ridiculous."

12. "People don\'t want change."

13. "It\'s not in the budget."

14. "Put it in writing."

15. "It will be more trouble than it\'s worth."

16. "It isn\'t your responsibility."

17. "That\'s not in your job description."

18. "You can\'t teach an old dog new tricks."

19. "Let\'s stick with what works."C

20. "We\'ve done all right so far."

* Reference: “What A Great Idea” by Charles “Chick” Thompson, 1992, HarperCollins Publishers

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

too many hats
Too many Hats*?

“Could you head up another committee, Bob ….

Or do you feel that you’re wearing enough hats already?”

* Ref. Cartoon is from the book “Create Fun @ Work”by Berge Boyadjian and Ron Paul, published by KCT, Long Beach, CA, 1999

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

dr edward de bono
Dr. Edward de Bono
  • Leading international authority
    • Conceptual thinking
    • Thinking skills
  • Has written 27 books
  • My favorites
    • Six Thinking Hats
    • Lateral Thinking
  • Application of these concepts were attributed to the success of 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

six thinking hats by dr edward de bono
Six Thinking Hats® by Dr. Edward de Bono

Effective use of the Six Thinking Hats® can:

  • Improve meeting outcomes
  • Focus thinking more clearly
  • Lead to more creative thinking
  • Improve decision making and communication

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

white hat thinking
White Hat Thinking
  • Neutral and objective in presenting information - like a computer
  • Two-tier system of information:
    • checked and proven facts
    • facts that are believed to be true
  • Spectrum of likelihood ranging from:

“always true” to “never true”

  • Usable levels in between: “always”

“sometimes” “occasionally”

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

red hat thinking
Red Hat Thinking
  • Legitimizes emotions and feelings as an important part of thinking
  • Provides a convenient method for a thinker to switch in and out of the feeling mode
  • Never attempt to justify feelings or provide a logical base for them
  • Two broad types of feelings:
    • Ordinary emotions, e.g., fear, dislike, suspicion
    • Complex judgments, e.g., intuition, sense

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

black hat thinking
Black Hat Thinking
  • Negative assessment, i.e., points out:
    • What is wrong, incorrect, or in error
    • Something does not fit experience or expected knowledge
    • Why something will not work, risks, dangers, faults
    • Can ask negative questions
  • Not argument; objective attempt to identify negative elements
  • May judge an idea against the past to see how it fits what is known
  • May project an idea into the future to see what may fail or go wrong
  • Not to be used for negative feelings which should use Red Hat

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

yellow hat thinking
Yellow Hat Thinking
  • Positive assessment, constructive, optimistic
  • Positive spectrum ranging from logical and practical to visions, dreams, and hopes
  • Seeks to put forward soundly based optimism; probes and explores for value and benefit
  • Effectiveness and making things happen, i.e., concrete proposals and suggestions
  • Speculative and opportunity seeking

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

green hat thinking
Green Hat Thinking
  • Creative thinking; symbolizes fertility and growth
  • Search for alternatives; to go beyond the known and obvious
  • Movement replaces judgment, i.e., move forward from an idea in order to reach a new idea
  • Provocation takes us out of usual patterns of thinking
  • Generate new concepts and perceptions

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

blue hat thinking
Blue Hat Thinking
  • Control hat; organizes the thinking, calls the other hats like the “conductor of the orchestra”
  • Sets the focus, defines the problems, shapes the questions, determines the thinking tasks
  • Responsible for overviews, summaries, & conclusions
  • Monitors thinking, stops argument, enforces discipline
  • Ensures the “rules of the game” are observed

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

six thinking hats by dr edward de bono15
Six Thinking Hats® by Dr. Edward de Bono

White: INFORMATION: pure facts and figures

Red: FEELINGS: emotions, hunches and intuition

Black: CAUTION: negative judgment, devil’s advocate

Yellow: BENEFITS: optimism, positive, opportunity

Green: CREATIVITY: new and innovative ideas

Blue: MANAGING: order, control, process, conclusion, orchestra conductor

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

six thinking hats application
Six Thinking Hats Application
  • Minimum of six individuals in a group
  • Recorder
  • Spokesperson
  • Six team members each choose a color hat
  • Wear it any way you want
    • Bandanna
    • Hair ribbon
    • Neck-tie
    • Arm band
    • Shawl
    • Scarf

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

six thinking hat process guidelines
Six Thinking Hat Process Guidelines
  • Expect all to participate in all thinking hats
  • The person wearing the hat is to make sure that all contribute to her/his thinking hat area discussion
  • Spend 5 minutes on each thinking hat, starting with the Blue hat
  • Discuss the specific given topic using the thinking hat
  • Make sure that at least one crazy and unusual idea is discussed and recorded
  • Use the form to document the results
    • Spokesperson and recorder names
    • Notes for each thinking hat and
    • Conclusion
  • Share the conclusion + the crazy idea

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

six thinking hats form
Six Thinking Hats Form

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

why they re called cursors
Why They’re Called Cursors!

* Ref. Cartoon is from the book “Create Fun @ Work”by Berge Boyadjian and Ron Paul, published by KCT, Long Beach, CA, 1999

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

use the process to answer the question
Use the process to answer the question:

“What should anti-terrorism coalition do about anti-western teachings in some mosques and schools around the globe?”

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

six thinking hats sample form
Six Thinking Hats Sample Form

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

break
Break

“Oh no ………I must’ve brought in the bag of steer manure, and left the bag of coffee in the car”

* Ref. Cartoon is from the book “Create Fun @ Work”by Berge Boyadjian and Ron Paul, published by KCT, Long Beach, CA, 1999

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

end of break
End of Break

“How to take a longer smoke break”

* Ref. Cartoon is from the book “Create Fun @ Work”by Berge Boyadjian and Ron Paul, published by KCT, Long Beach, CA, 1999

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

focused innovation workshop
Focused Innovation Workshop

* Ref. Cartoon is from the book “Create Fun @ Work”by Berge Boyadjian and Ron Paul, published by KCT, Long Beach, CA, 1999

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

background
Background
  • Studied creativity
  • Concluded that all can be creative if they do what creative people do naturally
  • Developed Creativity Workshop
    • Introduce eight creativity tools
    • Apply each to a class project
    • All participants apply them to their chosen technical or non technical challenge
  • Read about benefits of fun at work
  • Combined fun with creativity tools to develop Focused Innovation Workshop

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

creativity rules of thumb
Creativity Rules of Thumb *

1. The best way to get great ideas is to get lots of ideas and throw the bad ones away.

2. Create ideas that are fifteen minutes ahead of their time. . .not light-years ahead.

3. Always look for a second right answer.

4. If at first you don\'t succeed . . . take a break!

5. Write down your ideas before you forget them!

6. If everyone says you\'re wrong, you\'re one step ahead. If everyone laughs at you, you\'re two steps ahead.

7. The answer to any problem "pre-exists." We need to ask the right question to reveal the answer. --Jonas Salk

8. When you ask a dumb question, you get a smart answer. -- Aristotle

9. Never solve a problem from its original perspective.

10. Visualize your problem as solved before solving it.

11. All behavior consists of opposites . . . Learn to see things backward, inside out, and upside down. --Lao-tzu, Tao-te Ching

12. Challenging an assumption can turn obstacles into opportunities.

13. If different shoes don\'t work, try looking at your problem from a helicopter . . . or a space ship.

14. Think like Nature. Ask "How would Nature solve this problem?" --Jonas Salk

15. Swipe from the best, then adapt. --Tom Peters

16. Make sure that the penalty for failure is not greater than the penalty for doing nothing.

17. Often it\'s the interesting part of an idea--not the positive or negative--that leads to innovation.

18. Writing down your ideas is like money in the bank.

19. Always start a sixty-minute meeting with a one-minute warm-up exercise.

20. Make friends with your shower. If inspired to sing, maybe the song has an idea in it for you. --Albert Einstein

* Reference: “What A Great Idea” by Charles “Chick” Thompson, 1992, HarperCollins Publishers

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

focused innovation workshop description
Focused Innovation Workshop Description
  • Focus on a specific topics such as ...
    • Cost savings
    • Process cycle time reductions
    • Technical innovations or problem resolution
    • Strategy development
    • Creating more fun @ work
  • Generate hundreds of unique ideas and innovations within 3 to 8 hours
  • Acquire group buy-in of the selected solutions
  • Generate new patents around patents that are about to expire
  • Generate patents around your competition’s patent
  • Establish a patent protection “umbrella”

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

patent umbrella example
Patent Umbrella Example
  • Before my workshop Boeing had only one patent on Propellant Densification
  • As a direct result of my Focused Innovation Workshop on Propellant Densification, Boeing was awarded the following four new US patents:
    • US06164078: 12/26/2000 - Cryogenic liquid heat exchanger system with fluid ejector
    • US06151900: 11/28/2000 - Cryogenic densification through introduction of a second cryogenic fluid
    • US06131397: 10/17/2000 - Slush producing process and device
    • US06073450: 06/13/2000 - Combined diffuser and re-circulation manifold in a propellant tank

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

focused innovation workshops produce outstanding results
Focused Innovation Workshops Produce Outstanding Results
  • Two day workshop on Propellant Densification
    • Generated 12 innovation disclosures
    • Four US patents were awarded in 2000
  • Four workshops produced 69 innovations in the areas of space vehicle structures, thermal protection, systems, and health management
  • Two four-hour workshops on Wireless Micro-Instrumentation
    • Generated 24 innovations
  • Two four-hour sessions on Shuttle Configuration Verification Accounting System
    • Produced 130 improvement ideas
    • Implementation cost for the top 13 ideas is estimated to be about $750,000
    • Estimated cost savings of $4,000,000 per year for the next five years
    • Six of these ideas are implemented already, actual savings of $414,000/year
  • Within six hours 50 Space Shuttle Subsystem Managers agreed on their top five issues and the next five steps and accountabilities to implement the improvements

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

typical workshop agenda
Typical Workshop Agenda
  • Objectives
  • Team members & roles
  • Workshop rules/process
  • Introduction of process or technology challenge
  • Idea generation
  • Prioritization
  • Clarification of key innovations
  • Selection of key innovations
  • Next steps and commitments defined

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

participant selection and adherence to rules is key to fiw success
Participant Selection and Adherence to Rules is Key To FIW Success
  • Typically there are 6-10 individuals in workshop:
    • Content clients (1-2)
    • Technology or process experts 1-2)
    • “Wild Ducks” (2-4) [creative, “out of the box” thinkers]
    • Facilitators (1-2)
  • Workshop rules:Have fun, stay focused, no criticism allowed, build on each other’s ideas

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

team members their roles are
Team Members & Their Roles Are …
  • Content Clients - Technical lead and a “wild duck”

Role: Define the problem, key questions, select resources and direct the sessions

  • Experts - Technology, process, or subject area

Role: Contribute ideas, suggestions, concerns and perspective

  • “Wild Ducks” to promote lateral thinking, “Out of Box” thinking

Role: Contribute ideas, suggestions, concerns and perspective

  • Change champion(s)

Role: One or two members who commit to follow through and facilitate

documentation / application of the selected ideas

  • Facilitators

Role: Guide session in the direction set by the content clients and record

generated ideas, strategies & recommendations

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

idea generation process is simple but very effective
Idea Generation Process Is Simple But Very Effective
  • Session one (springboard)
    • Develop a list of open questions, comments, observations on the specific technology or process or challenge. (How to..., I wish..., If only we could …. , In what ways might we ..., Or specific questions, or suggestions) Key question:“What is impossible today that if it was possible, it would drastically change the way we do it?”
    • Quietly, individually write down ideas/questions foils for five minutes
    • Share an idea, document, share related ideas, build on previous ideas, repeat till all ideas are covered
  • Multiple follow-on sessions (as directed by content clients)
    • Focus subsequent iterations on items from springboard or other sessions
    • Follow the rest of the process above, generate ideas, share, document, … .
  • Concluding efforts
    • Categorize, combine ideas
    • Prioritize and select promising innovations
    • Generate more ideas on the selected innovations (if time permits)
    • Determine next few steps

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

spin fiw application process
SPIN FIW Application Process
  • Select an element of software development process to generate improvement ideas on
    • Collect all ideas
    • Rate them: A: Vital, B: Important, C: Nice to have
    • Prioritize the A’s to A1, A2...
  • All teams share their selected A1 process
  • Gather selections from all teams and select the process for all to focus on
  • Conduct springboard session by gathering ideas on the question “In what ways might we decrease the process cycle time by at least 50%?”
    • Take five minutes, quietly each write answers
    • Share answers with your team
    • Record answers
    • Prioritize using the rating process above; rate each as A, B, or C, select A1-3
    • Select and share top three ideas
  • Facilitate selection of the topic for the next session
  • Conduct a second session
  • Conduct a second session (if time permits)

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

fiw form
FIW Form

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

after the workshop
After the Workshop ….
  • Document workshop summary and conclusions
  • Place it on SPIN website within one week
  • Expect all participants to apply both
    • Six Thinking Hats
    • Focused Innovation Workshop
  • Feel free to contact me, Berge Boyadjian, at

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

i could get more work done around here if the boss would just get off my back
“I could get more work done around here, if the boss would just get off my back!*”

* Ref. Cartoons are from the book “Create Fun @ Work”by Berge Boyadjian and Ron Paul, published by KCT, Long Beach, CA, 1999

© 2002 by KCT - Knowledge Capture and Transfer http://home.earthlink.net/~bergevb/

Email: [email protected]

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