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Pronouns. Chapter 3, Lessons 1, 4, 5, 6, and 9 (featuring Nemo and his friends from “The Seas” attraction at EPCOT Center in Walt Disney World. Personal Pronouns. Chapter 3, Lesson 1, Page 58. What is a Pronoun?. A pronoun is a word that is used in place of a noun or another pronoun.

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pronouns

Pronouns

Chapter 3, Lessons 1, 4, 5, 6, and 9

(featuring Nemo and his friends from “The Seas” attraction at EPCOT Center in Walt Disney World

personal pronouns
Personal Pronouns

Chapter 3, Lesson 1, Page 58

what is a pronoun
What is a Pronoun?
  • A pronoun is a word that is used in place of a noun or another pronoun.
    • A pronoun can refer to a person, place, thing, or idea.
    • The word that a pronoun refers to is called its antecedent.
examples
Examples:
  • Ramon visited Death Valley, and he was impressed.
  • Death Valley is mysterious. It is silent.
personal pronouns1
Personal Pronouns
  • Pronouns such as we, I, he, them, and it are called personal pronouns.
    • Personal pronouns have a variety of forms to indicate different persons, numbers, and cases.
dory says
Dory says:

“Don’t forget: there are NO apostrophes in a possessive pronoun!”

possessive pronouns
Possessive Pronouns

Chapter 3, Lesson 4, Page 65

“Mine! Mine! Mine!”

what is a possessive pronoun
What is a Possessive Pronoun?
  • A possessive pronoun is a pronoun used to show ownership or relationship.
    • The possessive pronouns my, your, her, his, its, our, and their come before nouns.
    • The possessive pronouns mine, yours, hers, his, ours, and theirs can stand alone in a sentence.
dory says1
Dory says:

“Don’t forget: there are NO apostrophes in a possessive pronoun!”

reflexive and intensive pronouns
Reflexive and Intensive Pronouns

Chapter 3, Lesson 5, Page 68

what are reflexive and intensive pronouns
What are Reflexive and Intensive Pronouns?
  • A pronoun that ends in self or selves is either a reflexive or intensive pronoun.
reflexive pronouns
Reflexive Pronouns
  • A reflexive pronoun refers back to the subject and directs the action of the verb back to the subject.
    • Reflexive pronouns are necessary to the meaning of the sentence – you need it so the sentence makes sense.
      • Example – Houdini called himself a master escape artist.
intensive pronouns
Intensive Pronouns
  • An intensive pronoun emphasizes a noun or another pronoun in the sentence.
    • They are not necessary to the meaning of the sentence – you can take them out and the sentence will still make sense.
      • Example – I myself like to perform magic tricks.
interrogative and demonstrative pronouns
Interrogative and Demonstrative Pronouns

Chapter 3, Lesson 6, Page 70

interrogative pronouns
Interrogative Pronouns
  • An interrogative pronoun is used to introduce a question.
    • Examples:
      • Who made up this riddle?
      • Which riddle are you talking about?
      • What riddle book did you read?
who vs whom
Who vs. Whom
  • Who is always the subject of the sentence. It is the person doing the action.
  • Whom is used as the person that is receiving the action.
demonstrative pronouns
Demonstrative Pronouns
  • A demonstrative pronoun points out a person, place, thing, or idea.
    • The demonstrative pronouns – this, that, these, those – are used alone in a sentence.
      • This is Nemo and his father.
      • That is the ocean they live in.
      • Those are their friends.
indefinite pronoun agreement
Indefinite-Pronoun Agreement

Chapter 3, Lesson 8, Page 76

indefinite pronouns
Indefinite Pronouns
  • An indefinite pronoun does not refer to a specific person, place, thing or idea.
    • Indefinite pronouns do not have antecedents.
      • Examples:
        • Something unusual is going on in Disney World.
slide24

Some indefinite pronouns are always singular, some are always plural, and some can be either singular or plural.

singular indefinite pronouns
Singular Indefinite Pronouns
  • Use a singular personal pronoun to refer to a singular indefinite pronoun.
    • Example:
      • Everyone took his or her camera.
plural indefinite pronouns
Plural Indefinite Pronouns
  • Use a plural personal pronoun to refer to a plural indefinite pronoun.
    • Example:
      • Several reported their sightings of the monster.
singular or plural indefinite pronouns
Singular or Plural Indefinite Pronouns
  • Some indefinite pronouns can be singular or plural.
    • The phrase that follows the indefinite pronoun will often tell you whether the pronoun is singular or plural.
      • Example: Most of the monster story has its origin in fantasy.
dory says2
Dory says:

“Don’t forget: there are NO apostrophes in a possessive pronoun!”

remember
Remember:

You will have a test on pronouns on Friday, October 15th!

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