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A CASE STUDY ON HAROUN AND THE SEA OF STORIES BY SALMAN RUSHDIE AND ITS TURKISH TRANSLATION HARUN İLE ÖYKÜLER DENİZİ. Presented By Burçe Kaya. Tarragona 20-21 October 2006. AIM. To present some interesting results of a comparative analysis

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A CASE STUDY ON HAROUN AND THE SEA OF STORIES

BY SALMAN RUSHDIE AND ITS TURKISH TRANSLATION

HARUN İLE ÖYKÜLER DENİZİ

Presented By Burçe Kaya

Tarragona

20-21 October 2006


AIM

To present some interesting results of a comparative analysis

of Salman Rushdie’s tale’s book Haroun and the Sea of Stories

(Granta Books, 1990) and its Turkish translation Harun ile

Öyküler Denizi (Metis, 1994)in terms of the transformation of

the elements which are peculiar to Indian culture and which

give the book its postcolonial quality, into the target language.


CRITICAL QUESTION

To what extent is the “foreignness” of the original text

preserved in its translation?

FOCAL POINT

Culture specific concepts

Proper names

Rushdie’s way of using English.


THEORETHICAL BACKGROUND

The relationship between post-colonial literature and post-colonial

translation theories and the concept of “translation” in a post-colonial

context.

“[…] translation has always been an indispensable channel of imperial

conquest and occupation” (Robinson 1997, 10).

Translation as a tool for colonization OR decolonization.

The word ‘translation’ comes, etymologically, from the Latin for

‘bearing across’. Having been borne across the world, we are translated

men. It is normally supposed that something always gets lost in translation;

I cling, obstinately, to the notion that something can also be gained.

(Rushdie 1991: 17).


CASE STUDY

Haroun and the Sea of Stories :

A fantastic story of Rashid, Haroun’s father, who was a storyteller but who lost his

ability to tell stories.

  • Interjection of Target Culture Elements into the Source Text

  • Adaptation of culture specific elements like private names, concepts and idioms to

  • the norms of the target culture.

TT: “’Her şey bir yerden gelir,’ diye düşünüyordu Harun, ‘öyleyse bu öyküler de gökten

zembille iniyor olamazdı herhalde?...” (TT: 13) (italics mine).

ST: “’Everything comes from somewhere,’ Haroun reasoned, ‘so these stories can’t simply

come out of thin air…’” (ST: 17)

TT: “Reşit de derin bir soluk alarak bu kızılca kıyametin içine daldı” (TT: 23) (italics mine).

ST: “Rashid, taking a deep breath, dived into the scrum” (ST: 32).


TT: “Posta Arabası , Otobüs Garajı’nın kapısından roket gibi fırlayarak çıktı; sonra

Harun’un üzerinde şu yazıları okuduğu duvarı kıl payı sıyırarak geçip gitti:” (TT: 25) (italics mine)

ST: “The Mail Coach rocketed through the gates of the Bus Depot, narrowly missing a wall on

which Haroun read this:” (ST: 35).

TT: “’Yazıklar olsun, eyvah! Vah, vah, vah!’” (TT:109)

ST: “’Woe is us! Alas, alack-a-day! Hai-hai-hai!’” (ST:145)


Homi Bhabha suggests that a hybrid language and culture does not necessarily mean a

manipulation of the indigenous language and culture by the colonizer; it can also be used against

the British when the English cultural and linguistic traditions are interpreted and rewritten by the

Indian writers (Bhabha 1994: 88).

ST: “ ‘Eleven o’clock when his mother excited,’ she declared. ‘Now comes this

problem of eleven minutes. Cause is located in his pussy-collar-jee’” (Rushdie 1990: 24)

(italics mine).

TT: “ ‘Saat on bir annesinin evden çıktığı saat,’ dedi. ‘Şimdi de bu on bir dakika

sorunu çıkıyor karşımıza. Çünkü bu onun pisi-kol-içisine yerleşmiş’” (Salman 1994: 19)

(italics mine).

Psychology – pussy-collar-jee (ST)

Psikoloji – pisi-kol-içi (TT)


ST: “’Tip-top plan,’ she said. ‘Yes, both of you, go; it will be like a little holiday, and no

need to worry about me, sitting sitting all by myself’” (Rushdie 1990: 25)(italics mine).

TT: “’Çok iyi plan,’ dedi. ‘Evet, ikiniz de gidin; küçük bir tatil olur bu size; beni merak

etmenize gerek yok; oturur dururum ben burda kendi başıma’” (Rushdie 1994: 19) (italics mine).


Meanings of the Hindustani Names:

“Batcheat is from ‘baat-cheet’, that is ‘chit-chat’”

“Bat-Mat-Karo means ‘Do-Not-Speak’”

“Bezeban means ‘Without-a-Tongue’”

Transcribed Hindustani Names:

Haroun - Harun

Rashid Khalifa – Reşit Kalfa

Alifbay – Elifba

Soraya – Süreyya

Oneeta – Oneyta

Translated English and Hindustani Names:

Ocean of Notions - Buluşlar Okyanusu

Lake of Many Names - Çok Adlı Göl

Luxury Class Houseboat - Lüks Sınıf Evgemi

Shah of Blah - Laflar Şahı

Grand Panjandrums – Ulu Pohpohçular

Land of Cup - Sus Ülkesi


Douglas Robinson suggests, “In a post-colonial context, the vast power differentials

between the two cultures must be added in to the equation, with the result that translation

between them becomes extremely problematic, even impossible (thus the ’understandability

of culture’)” (Robinson 1997: 28)

“[t]ranslation is no longer merely a semantic transfer operation performed on verbal texts by a

few highly trained professionals with linguistic and cultural skills related to more than one

national or regional culture […]” (Robinson 1997: 31).


THE END the vast power differentials


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