Office
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 12

ADVANCE PAID Program PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 75 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Office of Academic Personnel. Setting the UC Context for Issues of the Double Bind Yolanda Moses Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Excellence, and Equity & Professor of Anthropology UC Riverside. ADVANCE PAID Program. Two Key Documents in the Double Bind Literature.

Download Presentation

ADVANCE PAID Program

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Advance paid program

Office of

Academic

Personnel

Setting the UC Context for Issues

of the Double Bind

Yolanda Moses

Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Excellence,

and Equity & Professor of Anthropology

UC Riverside

ADVANCE PAID Program


Two key documents in the double bind literature

Two Key Documents in the Double Bind Literature

Office of

Academic

Personnel

  • (1976). Malcolm, Hall, and Brown. “The Double Bind: The Price of Being a Minority Woman in Science.” American Association for the Advancement of Science

  • (2011). Ong, Wright, Espinosa, and Orfield. “Inside the Double Bind: A Synthesis of Empirical Research on Undergraduate and Graduate Women of Color in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.” Harvard Educational Review

ADVANCE PAID Program


The double bind 1976

“The Double Bind” (1976)

Office of

Academic

Personnel

  • There is little information and no data on the status of women of color in science.

  • Women of color in science were excluded from programs for underrepresented populations or programs for women because of biases related to both their race or ethnicity and gender, constituting a double bind.

  • Programs for underrepresented populations were dominated by male scientists or majority women: “minority women were, in fact, falling somewhere in between the funded efforts to improve science opportunities for minorities and efforts to advance women in science.”

ADVANCE PAID Program


The double bind 19761

“The Double Bind” (1976)

Office of

Academic

Personnel

  • Conference attendees recommended that the educational system offer “only what the system already offers male students”: access to financial aid information, supportive student services, faculty role models, research training, counseling, and job placement services.

  • Conference attendees recommended that employers institute flexible work schedules, financial and policy support for child care, grant writing education, career workshops, communication networks, mentoring, appointment to advisory councils, data collection by race and by gender.

ADVANCE PAID Program


Inside the double bind 2011

“Inside the Double Bind” (2011)

Office of

Academic

Personnel

  • The “Double Bind” continues: “URM women remain proportionally underrepresented [in STEM] relative to their representation in the U. S. Population.”

  • Inadequacy of programs: “history has borne out the reality that programs intended to serve women disproportionately benefit White women, and programs intended to serve minorities mainly benefit minority males.”

  • The double bind remains as “the way in which race/ethnicity and gender function simultaneously to produce distinct experiences for women of color in STEM.”

ADVANCE PAID Program


Inside the double bind 20111

“Inside the Double Bind” (2011)

Office of

Academic

Personnel

  • “The pernicious myth that women of color are under-represented in STEM fields because they are simply not interested in pursuing scientific careers continues to circulate.”

  • Authors review research on undergraduate and graduate students; little research on the double bind for faculty in STEM.

  • Support from peers and faculty are inadequate: “Young women of color in science have to carry out a tremendous amount of extra, and indeed, invisible work in order to gain acceptance from their male . . . peers and faculty.”

ADVANCE PAID Program


Inside the double bind 20112

“Inside the Double Bind” (2011)

Office of

Academic

Personnel

Research shows several common characteristics across the undergraduate, graduate, and faculty experience:

  • Difficulties of transition and points of loss between the academic stages

  • Critical role that climate plays in women’s retention in STEM, including issues of isolation, identity, invisibility, negotiating/navigation, microaggressions on a daily basis, sense of belonging, and tokenism

  • “. . . Creating more women of color STEM PhDs and getting them into faculty positions could help foster cultural changes that would improve overall faculty support for and increase the enrollment and retention of minority women.”

ADVANCE PAID Program


What do we need to know about uc

What Do We Need to Know About UC?

Office of

Academic

Personnel

  • Some of the infrastructure problems found in the educational system have been addressed, i.e. access to financial aid information, research training, and career counseling.

  • Family friendly policies for faculty are in place.

  • Each campus has in place a diversity/equity structure to support women of color.

  • Data collection is underway to help us define successes, challenges, and next steps.

ADVANCE PAID Program


Advance paid program

Sources: UC ADVANCE PAID Data Portfolio from the following tables: Pipeline Analysis of California Public High School Students to UC Enrollees, 2009-10

Number and Percent of Total UC Bachelor Degrees Conferred by Gender, Ethnicity, and Discipline - 2010-11

Number and Percent of Total UC Doctoral Degrees Conferred by Gender, Ethnicity, and Discipline - 2010-11


Advance paid program

Source: UC ADVANCE PAID Data Portfolio from the following tables:

Ladder and Equivalent Rank Faculty with Tenure by Discipline by Gender by Ethnicity with percentages

UC Systemwide Female STEM Faculty by Ethnicity by Year

UC Systemwide Female SBS Faculty by Ethnicity by Year


Advance paid program

All Disciplines

STEM Disciplines Only

  • Source: UC Systemwide Faculty Search Data Report for 2011-12


  • Login