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4-7. Introduction to Coordinate Proof. Warm Up. Lesson Presentation. Lesson Quiz. Holt Geometry. Warm Up Evaluate. 1. Find the midpoint between (0, 2 x ) and (2 y , 2 z ).

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4-7

Introduction to Coordinate Proof

Warm Up

Lesson Presentation

Lesson Quiz

Holt Geometry


Warm Up

Evaluate.

1.Find the midpoint between (0, 2x) and (2y, 2z).

2. One leg of a right triangle has length 12, and the hypotenuse has length 13. What is the length of the other leg?

3. Find the distance between (0, a) and (0, b), where b > a.

(y, x + z)

5

b – a


Objectives

Position figures in the coordinate plane for use in coordinate proofs.

Prove geometric concepts by using

coordinate proof.


Vocabulary

coordinate proof


You have used coordinate geometry to find the midpoint of a line segment and to find the distance between two points. Coordinate geometry can also be used to prove conjectures.

A coordinate proof is a style of proof that uses coordinate geometry and algebra. The first step of a coordinate proof is to position the given figure in the plane. You can use any position, but some strategies can make the steps of the proof simpler.


Example 1: Positioning a Figure in the Coordinate Plane line segment and to find the distance between two points. Coordinate geometry can also be used to prove conjectures.

Position a square with a side length of 6 units in the coordinate plane.

You can put one corner of the square at the origin.


Check It Out! line segment and to find the distance between two points. Coordinate geometry can also be used to prove conjectures. Example 1

Position a right triangle with leg lengths of 2 and 4 units in the coordinate plane. (Hint: Use the origin as the vertex of the right angle.)


Once the figure is placed in the coordinate plane, you can use slope, the coordinates of the vertices, the Distance Formula, or the Midpoint Formula to prove statements about the figure.


Example 2: Writing a Proof Using Coordinate Geometry use slope, the coordinates of the vertices, the Distance Formula, or the Midpoint Formula to prove statements about the figure.

Write a coordinate proof.

Given: Rectangle ABCD with A(0, 0), B(4, 0),

C(4, 10), and D(0, 10)

Prove: The diagonals bisect each other.


Example 2 Continued use slope, the coordinates of the vertices, the Distance Formula, or the Midpoint Formula to prove statements about the figure.

By the Midpoint Formula,

mdpt. of

mdpt. of

The midpoints coincide, therefore the diagonals bisect each other.


area of use slope, the coordinates of the vertices, the Distance Formula, or the Midpoint Formula to prove statements about the figure.∆ABC = bh

= (4)(6) = 12 square units

Check It Out! Example 2

Use the information in Example 2 (p. 268) to write a coordinate proof showing that the area of ∆ADB is one half the area of ∆ABC.

Proof:∆ABC is a right triangle with height AB and base BC.


0+4 , 6+0 use slope, the coordinates of the vertices, the Distance Formula, or the Midpoint Formula to prove statements about the figure.

2 2

By the Midpoint Formula, the coordinates of

D = = (2, 3).

1

1

1

2

2

2

The area of ∆ADB = bh

= (6)(2) = 6 square units

Since 6 = (12), the area of ∆ADB is one half the area of ∆ABC.

Check It Out! Example 2 Continued

The x-coordinate of D is the height of ∆ADB, and the base is 6 units.


A coordinate proof can also be used to prove that a certain relationship is always true.

You can prove that a statement is true for all right triangles without knowing the side lengths.

To do this, assign variables as the coordinates of the vertices.


Example 3A: Assigning Coordinates to Vertices relationship is always true.

Position each figure in the coordinate plane and give the coordinates of each vertex.

rectangle with width m and length twice the width


Example 3B: Assigning Coordinates to Vertices relationship is always true.

Position each figure in the coordinate plane and give the coordinates of each vertex.

right triangle with legs of lengths s and t


Caution! relationship is always true.

Do not use both axes when positioning a figure unless you know the figure has a right angle.


Check It Out! relationship is always true. Example 3

Position a square with side length 4p in the coordinate plane and give the coordinates of each vertex.


If a coordinate proof requires calculations with fractions, choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler.

For example, use multiples of 2 when you are to find coordinates of a midpoint. Once you have assigned the coordinates of the vertices, the procedure for the proof is the same, except that your calculations will involve variables.


Remember! choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler.

Because the x- and y-axes intersect at right angles, they can be used to form the sides of a right triangle.


Example 4: Writing a Coordinate Proof choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler.

Given: Rectangle PQRS

Prove: The diagonals are .

Step 1 Assign coordinates to each vertex.

The coordinates of P are (0, b),

the coordinates of Q are (a, b),

the coordinates of R are (a, 0),

and the coordinates of S are (0, 0).

Step 2 Position the figure in the coordinate plane.


By the distance formula, choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler. PR = √ a2 + b2, and

QS = √a2 + b2 . Thus the diagonals are .

Example 4 Continued

Given: Rectangle PQRS

Prove: The diagonals are .

Step 3 Write a coordinate proof.


Check It Out! choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler. Example 4

Use the information in Example 4 to write a coordinate proof showing that the area of ∆ADB is one half the area of ∆ABC.

Step 1 Assign coordinates to each vertex.

The coordinates of A are (0, 2j),

the coordinates of B are (0, 0),

and the coordinates of C are (2n, 0).

Step 2 Position the figure in the coordinate plane.


Check It Out! choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler. Example 4 Continued

Step 3 Write a coordinate proof.


Proof: choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler. ∆ABC is a right triangle with height 2j and base 2n.

The area of ∆ABC = bh

= (2n)(2j)

= 2nj square units

By the Midpoint Formula, the coordinates of

D = = (n, j).

1

1

2

2

0 + 2n, 2j + 0

2 2

Check It Out! Example 4 Continued


The height of choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler. ∆ADB is j units, and the base is 2n units.

area of ∆ADB = bh

= (2n)(j)

= nj square units

Since nj = (2nj), the area of ∆ADB is one half the area of ∆ABC.

1

1

1

2

2

2

Check It Out! Example 4 Continued


Possible answers: choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler.

Lesson Quiz: Part I

Position each figure in the coordinate plane.

1. rectangle with a length of 6 units and a width of 3 units

2. square with side lengths of 5a units


3. choose coordinates that make the calculations simpler. Given: Rectangle ABCD with coordinates A(0, 0), B(0, 8), C(5, 8), and D(5, 0). E is mdpt. of BC, and F is mdpt. of AD.

Prove:EF = AB

By the Midpoint Formula, the coordinates of E are

, 8 .

and F are,0. Then EF =8,and AB = 8.

Thus EF = AB.

5

2

5

2

Lesson Quiz: Part II


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