Pgce science types of enquiry
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 29

PGCE Science Types of Enquiry PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 99 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

PGCE Science Types of Enquiry. The Process Circus - context. “By actively engaging in (12 activity stations) teachers begin to develop their own understanding of the process skills of enquiry-based science …and are better able to develop these …in the classroom.” (Harlen, The Exploratorium)

Download Presentation

PGCE Science Types of Enquiry

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Pgce science types of enquiry

PGCE Science

Types of Enquiry

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


The process circus context

The Process Circus - context

  • “By actively engaging in (12 activity stations) teachers begin to develop their own understanding of the process skills of enquiry-based science …and are better able to develop these …in the classroom.” (Harlen, The Exploratorium)

  • Describe scientific processes in terms of “what one is doing when using process skills”

  • Foster group discussion/dialogue – uncover and tease out ambiguities and differences of understanding.

  • Harlen, W. (1998) Professional Development Tools for Inquiry-Based Science: The Process Circus: Developing the Process Skills of Inquiry-Based Science -. Available online athttp://www.exploratorium.edu/ifi/activities/processcircus/circusfulltext.html

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


The process circus activities

The Process Circus - Activities

  • Work in 2s or 3s.

  • Visit each of the 12 stations of activities – in any order

  • Carry out the activity described on the accompanying card.

  • Identify the main (one or two) process skill(s) being used (you may identify more).

  • Fill in the activity form – add to the list if you wish.

  • Which of these activities could be used to do fair testing and which would lead to other types of investigations?

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Pgce science types of enquiry

University of Winchester. PGCE Science

*


Process circus reflection

Process Circus - Reflection

  • Discussion

    – what differences / similarities have arisen?

    - what extra skills have been identified?

    Refer to EYFS and NC documents to revise and refresh

    your understanding of skill progression:

    For EACH skill:

  • Trace the progression from Early Years to KS2. What are the expectations? How does the skill become more complex?

  • On SE, observe children using skills in practical work.

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Teachers questions

Teachers’ Questions

Discuss Harlen and Qualter (2009) Chapter 12 Teachers’ and Children’s Questions

What is the difference between ‘productive’ and ‘unproductive’ questions?

What types of productive question are there and what is the purpose of each in encouraging children’s scientific enquiry?

What reasons do Harlen & Qualter (2009) give for the use of open person-centred questions rather than closed subject centred questions?

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Teachers questions summary of types harlen and qualter 2009

Teachers’ questions - summary of types (Harlen and Qualter 2009)

Attention focusing

Measuring and counting

Comparison

Action

Problem –posing

These are called PRODUCTIVE questions because they stimulate productive activity.

In the context of electricity, we will practise using productive questions from each of Harlen’s categories to stimulate elicitation & enquiry.

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Writing and trialling productive questions

Writing and trialling productive questions

  • In pairs, write a set of productive questions from each of Harlen’s categories to stimulate investigation of …

  • Try out your questions on another pair. You will be the ‘teacher’ asking the questions and they the ‘pupils’.

  • Swap roles so that the other pair can try out their questions also.

  • Compare your ‘pupil’ responses with what you expected. How were they the same, different?

  • Record and be prepared to feedback your findings.

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Feedback writing and trialling productive questions

Feedback - Writing and trialling productive questions

Discussion

  • How were your 'pupil's ' responses the same / different to what you expected.? How might you explain this?

  • What is the purpose of different types of questions in encouraging scientific enquiry?

  • What are the implications from this activity for your planning in school?

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Children s responses to teachers questions

Children’s responses to teachers’ questions

You can improve children’s responses by using the following strategies:

  • Pause, allow the children time to think.

  • Prompt, to help them start their answer.

  • Redirect, clarify or refocus, to make your question clear.

  • Reflect on their answer to give them a chance to extend it.

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Effective teachers questions in science

Effective teachers’ questions in science

Employ a range of question forms.

Link the question to a scientific outcome

Scientific learning outcome + question type = effective question

Offer questions and invite children to ask a range of questions in a variety of scientific contexts

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Outcomes of teacher questioning in science

Outcomes of teacher questioning in science

Effective questions can:

  • Direct children to worthwhile activities

  • Cause children to reason, predict, hypothesise

  • Uncover how children view a situation

  • Indicate the level at which children are operating

  • Disclose their understanding or misunderstanding

  • Enable children to express ideas

  • Expose children’s feelings about an idea

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Pgce science

PGCE Science

Electricity

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Electricity elicitation

Electricity - elicitation

  • ‘Draw a picture of what might be happening inside a conducting wire’

    Do this individually, then swap with someone.

    What does the drawing show you about the drawers understanding of electricity?

    In what ways is this different from your own?

    Devise one or two questions you can ask the other person to elicit further ideas that will help you to understand better their level of knowledge.

    Ask the questions.

    Kibble, B. (1999) How do you picture electricity? Physics Education, 34 (4), pp.226-229

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Electricity nc ks1 ks2 ey

Electricity – NC KS1 KS2/EY

  • Safety! Ref. Be Safe and Hampshire Guidelines

  • Uses of electricity in everyday life

  • Electrical circuits and their components

  • Conductors and Insulators

  • Use of switches to make components work

  • Investigation simple circuits

  • Use of symbols/diagrams to represent circuits

  • Also look at the requirements of KS3 Sc4 to provide extension work

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Electricity developing complexity

Electricity- Developing complexity

  • Trace the progression of ideas about electricity Key Stages 1-3

  • Note target vocabulary levels 1-5.

    ‘Progression implies progress, and progress suggests a journey. Conceptual progress might be considered to be a journey through a landscape of developing ideas and it is a journey travelled by learners. It is, of course, a lifelong journey’

    (Kibble 2006: 198).

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Electricity conceptual progression

Electricity – conceptual progression

  • ‘Progression isn’t about simply learning more and more things. It is more about revising ideas in more depth, in extending the range of contexts in which ideas exist and about an increasing complexity both in the nature of concepts and also in the language used to describe them. Perhaps most significantly it is about articulating changes in one’s thinking’ (Kibble 2006: 199).

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Electricity examples of children s work

Electricity- examples of children’s work

  • Explore the written examples taken from the Nuffield SPACE project. Assess where the children are at using the NC Levels as well as the attainment targets. What questions would you ask to help to move them on?

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Electricity examples of children s ideas

Electricity – examples of children’s ideas

  • -there is more current in the wire leading up to the bulb than after

  • -the flow is the same from both ends of the battery and clashes at the bulb

  • -there is only flow in the supply wire, the other one is unnecessary

    (Osborne and Freyberg 1985)

    How might you handle each of these ideas?

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Practical electricity illustrative investigative approaches

PRACTICAL electricity – Illustrative / Investigative Approaches

  • In small groups carry out two practical tasks, one using the illustrative approach and the other the investigative approach.

  • For each activity note the decisions

    you had to make and the Sc1 skills used.

  • Compare and contrast the two approaches and discuss how each could be used in the primary classroom. Advantages? Disadvantages?

  • Prepare group feed back.

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Illustrative summary

Illustrative - SUMMARY

  • Involves direction by the teacher/workcard at every stage

  • Directs or leads pupils to what is to be observed

  • Tells the pupils what to do and how to do it

  • Tells the pupils what equipment and measuring instruments to use

  • Prescribes methods of recording and communication

  • Specifies one route to the solution

  • Involves all pupils arriving at the same conclusion which illustrates the idea or concept under study

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Investigative summary

Investigative - SUMMARY

  • Allows pupils to make their own observations

  • Encourages pupils to make ‘I think because…’ statements which they can test

  • Allows pupils to plan for themselves how the investigation is to proceed

  • Allows pupils to work independently and make decisions what to change, what to measure or judge and what to keep the same

  • Allows pupils to select the most appropriate instruments and apparatus for an activity

  • Gives pupils the opportunity to decide which is the most appropriate means of recording and display

  • Allows pupils to place their own interpretation on data

  • Allows a variety of routes to a solution

  • Encourages further questions for investigation

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Progression in understanding circuits illustrative approach

Progression in understanding circuitsIllustrative approach

Work in pairs

Collect the electricity sheet and predict which of these will make the bulb light up.

Collect some wires, a bulb , a battery and a magnifier. Explore your equipment and use it to test your predictions. Explain your results to each other . What further questions do you need to ask to explore your understanding.

You may need to use wire cutters and strippers to bare the end of the wires- take care.

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Investigative approach

Investigative Approach

Investigate which materials are conductors/ insulators. Now using your knowledge of conductors, insulators and circuits make a battery holder, a bulb holder and switch using card, foil and paperclips. Make a circuit with your components. Try it with the buzzer and spinner.

Explore the electricity resources. Investigate switches further. Can you organise the switches in your circuit so that the spinner and light work separately?

What questions might you ask children to explore their understanding?

How might you adapt these activities for the classroom?

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Electricity in action

Electricity in Action

  • http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Electricity-Lesson-Review-6082870/

  • Note how the teacher is reflecting on her own practice

  • How did she use elicitation to start the lesson?

  • How did she move the children on? What questions did she ask?

  • http://www.learningcircuits.co.uk

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Investigations and challenges

Investigations and challenges

  • Use the concept cartoons to elicit the ideas you might want to explore. Develop this into an investigation

  • KS1 Read the Lighthouse Keepers Lunch. Could you design and make a lighthouse which works?

  • KS2 Using your knowledge of electricity make a question and answer game.

  • Make a steady hand game which buzzes when you touch the wire.

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Directed tasks

Directed Tasks

  • Complete the UCLES Audit on the LN. Follow the guidelines on the help sheet and remember to print off your summary results.

  • Use the Confidence Audit and UCLES Audit to set yourself targets in science. You may be able to address some of these on SE.

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Bibliography

Bibliography

  • Kibble, R. (2006) in Harlen (ed.) ASE Guide to Primary Science Education Hatfield: ASE

  • Kibble, R. (1999) How do you picture electricity? Physics Education 34 (4) pp.226-229

  • Nuffield Primary Science (1993) In-Service Pack, London: Collins

  • http://www.crocodile-clips.com/index.htm for free software

  • http://amasci.com/miscon/energ1.html for article electricity and energy

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


Readings

Readings

  • Reading Pack: Note Ward et al. which talks about progression in science enquiry

  • Read: Harlen and Qualter Ed.5 Ch.7 and Ch.10

  • Summarise in your own words, the link between process skills and conceptual development.

University of Winchester. PGCE Science


  • Login