Dr bernadette blair kingston university london
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An Examination of student formative assessment and feedback & its relationship to learning outcomes and the student learning experiences – an interim project report . Dr Bernadette Blair Kingston University - London. How does Formative feedback contribute to the summative assessment ?.

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Dr Bernadette Blair Kingston University - London

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Dr bernadette blair kingston university london

An Examination of student formative assessment and feedback & its relationship to learning outcomes and the student learning experiences – an interim project report

Dr Bernadette Blair

Kingston University - London


How does formative feedback contribute to the summative assessment

How does Formative feedback contribute to thesummativeassessment ?

  • it provides an indication of level of current achievement and signals ways toimprove areas of weakness against the course/module criteria

  • it provides an indication of level of current achievement and signals ways toimprove areas of weakness against the course/module criteria

  • It makes no formal contribution


Dr bernadette blair kingston university london

  • “Reference to formative feedback can be made in summative assessment,especially if students have made a significant transition. Sometimes studentsmention the formative feedback themselves (although they don't call it'formative feedback'!). Sometimes we refer to their lack of response tofeedback - although this is rarer”


How do you check that students have understood feedback

How do you check that students have understood feedback?

  • the tutorial that follows an assessment begins with a discussion of the notesfrom the previous assessment point.

  • Observing and monitoring group discussions, brain storming or mind mappingaims and objectives

  • Spend time explaining feedback face to face and seeking verbal and visualconfirmation


What have you found to be the advantages of giving face to face feedback

What have you found to be the advantages of giving face to facefeedback?

  • Students receive personalized feedback which is clear and accessible andenables them to learn and to seek further clarification;

  • Student have feedback that is always accompanied by feed-forward that letsthem know what they can do in order to improve their level of achievement;


What have you found to be the advantages of giving face to face feedback1

What have you found to be the advantages of giving face to facefeedback?

  • Based on body language, one can often judge both more promptly and more - Responseaccurately which aspects of the feedback are not adequately understood

  •  I am able to tailor the feedback to the student's responses, providingadditional explanation where necessary and moderating subsequent feedbackif it appears the student is finding the feedback difficult or de-motivating.


What other forms of formative feedback have led to examples of good practice in your experience

What other forms of formative feedback have led to examples of goodpractice in your experience?

  • At the end of projects I now find the best approach is to ask students to rankeach others work in terms of top to bottom (this is done individually and theresults put together to create the cohort's ranking of their own work). Thecohort is asked to decide what level each project should attain and then wehave a discussion as to whether the order / level is appropriate or not.


Dr bernadette blair kingston university london

  • Students are sometimes asked to complete crit feedback sheets for otherstudents. This benefits the student providing the feedback as it gives themthe opportunity to also reflect upon the same issues in their ownwork/presentation.


Dr bernadette blair kingston university london

  • recorded feedback - video and audiopeer review

  • audio feedback has improved the delay between submissions but this isgenerally on summative feedback. Other tutors want to pilot it in their modules.

  • sharing with other members of staff, research in learning and teaching


Have you found that there were any issues difficulties in giving face to face feedback

Have you found that there were any issues/difficulties in giving face to face feedback?

  • only in respect that praise and good work is 'easy' to feedback on and poorwork needs different strategies

  • In the belief that they are being 'judged' according to their apparent ability tounderstand the feedback, driven by ego needs, students occasionally attemptto indicate that they understand when they do no not.

  • time-intensive for tutors, back-to-back they are exhausting


Dr bernadette blair kingston university london

  • ‘They said 'oh it's great work and I thought no, that work is really rubbish and it is not good at all …the British are really polite so instead of saying it's rubbish they try and say it in a really nice way. To me it is straightforward - if it's bad it's bad.’

    (Blair, 2006)


What research says misinterpretation

What research says - Misinterpretation

  • 'teachers, who view participation as a sign of a healthy classroom culture may encourage questions or at least expect students to ask for clarification, questions, however, may illicit inaccurate responses where in many Asian countries 'yes' can mean 'no' 'maybe' or simply ’I heard what you said'.

    (Radcliffe-Thomas.2007)


Dr bernadette blair kingston university london

  • some critiques also nurture an unhealthy psychological environment in which active, independent artists become passive and dependent upon others‘ statements of approval. If they are not careful, image makers can also allow critiques to be disempowering, in effect, leading makers to the impotent position of "solve my problems for me," "I can't make a good image without you," ”I won't know if I have made a good image unless you tell me so."

    (Barrett, T. 2006 p.259/260)


Dr bernadette blair kingston university london

  • you could start by explaining what a ‘crit’ is. Those of us from other countries aren't in the casual lingo.

  • It shouldn't always be negative criticism. If tutors could work with what the students brought forward instead of focusing on only what the students could have done, then uni would be a better place.

  • Be more objective. Less personal likes and dislikes. Cover both good points and bad points


Workshop activity

Workshop Activity

  • Three terms commonly used in verbal feedback – how would you explain these to a student?

  • Synergy

  • Balance (Visual)

  • Aesthetic


Contact details

Contact details

  • Please contribute to this project by letting me have your email details so I can send you the questionnaire link so you can complete the questionnaire.

  • [email protected]

  • http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FMNHYXK


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