slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Measuring Up!

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 40

Measuring Up! - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 84 Views
  • Uploaded on

Measuring Up!. December 17, 1903 First Flight 120 feet in 12 seconds. Look how far we’ve come!. Orbiter length: 122 feet. diameter. A straight line passing through the center of a circle or sphere. 8,000 Miles. 13,000 Kilometers. diameter. 2,100 Miles or 3,500 Kilometers.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Measuring Up!' - lars-rush


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
look how far we ve come
Look how far we’ve come!

Orbiter length: 122 feet

slide4

diameter

A straight line passing through the center of a circle or sphere.

8,000 Miles

13,000 Kilometers

slide5

diameter

2,100 Miles or 3,500 Kilometers

Our moon is 1/4th the diameter of the Earth.

slide6

circumference

The size of something as given by the distance around it.

25,000 Miles

40,000 Kilometers

slide7

apogee

The point in the orbit of a heavenly body at which it is farthest from the earth.

252,000 Miles or 405,000 Kilometers

slide8

perigee

The point in the orbit of a heavenly body at which it is nearest to the earth.

224,000 Miles or 360,000 Kilometers

slide9

mean

The average value of a set of numbers.

240,000 Miles or 386,000 Kilometers

slide10

Using two objects to represent the Earth and moon, let’s estimate how far away the moon is from the Earth.

estimate

An approximate judgment or calculation.

slide12

Using circumference:

240,000 miles/25,000 miles = 9 ½

384,500 km/40,000 km = 9 ½

how long would it take to go to the moon
How long would it take to go to the moon?

Let’s take a car. We’ll even go faster than the speed limit (since there are no signs in space). Let’s say, 100 mph.

That means it will take 2,400 hours = 100 days!

That’s too long! Let’s take a jet instead.

A commercial airliner goes about 600 mph.

Now we’ll arrive in 400 hours = 16 ½ days!

slide14

The Saturn V rocket took us to the moon. With this rocket the trip took only 3 days!

To date, the Saturn-V is still the largest rocket ever built and flown. It was 363 ft tall.

slide15

Humans took their first trip to the moon in 1968. All we did then is fly around it.

  • In July of 1969 Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first humans to walk on the moon.
  • The last time we went to the moon was in 1972.
1972 are you joking
1972??? Are you joking?
  • The median household income was $9,697.
  • Cost of a first class stamp was 8 cents.
  • The pocket calculator was invented by Texas Instruments.
  • The VW Beetle was the biggest selling car.
  • M*A*S*H and the Waltons premiered on TV.
slide19

Using two objects to represent the Earth and the shuttle orbiter, let’s estimate how far away the orbiter is from the Earth.

estimate

An approximate judgment or calculation.

approximately how large will the international space station be when it s completed
Approximately how large will the International Space Station be when it’s completed?

1 Field

2 Fields

3 Fields

slide23

Where will we go next?

This looks like a lovely sunset…but it isn’t from Earth!

What about Mars?

slide24

What about a trip to the “Grand Canyon” of Mars? Valles Marineris is about 2500 miles long and up to 4 miles deep.

slide27

You should plan when to leave for this trip. At its closest, Mars is still tens of millions of miles away from Earth. Still, the decreased distance during "closest approach" allows for fuel-conserving flights to Mars every 26 months and a good view of Mars once or twice every 15 to 17 years for Earth-bound sky watchers.

slide28

Distance from Earth: Minimum

35 million miles (56,000,000 km) Maximum

250 million miles (399,000,000 km).

slide29

Using two objects to represent the Earth and Mars, let’s estimate how far away Mars is from the Earth.

estimate

An approximate judgment or calculation.

slide30

How long would it take to go to Mars?

Let’s take a car. We’ll even go faster than the speed limit (since there are no signs in space). Let’s say, 100 mph.

That means it will take 560,000 hours = 23,333 days = 64 years!

That’s too long! Let’s take a jet instead.

A commercial airliner goes about 600 mph.

Now we’ll arrive in 58,333 hours = 2,430 days = over 6 years!

slide31

Perhaps the new Crew Exploration Vehicle currently being developed will take us to Mars. With current technology, it will take an average of 7 months to travel one way to Mars.

slide35

These are just a few of the ways we benefit from the space program:

Joysticks

Protective Helmets

Windsurfer Fin

slide36

Physical Therapy Machines

Air Traffic Control Equipment

Insulin Delivery System

spinoff applications the list goes on and on
Spinoff Applications… the list goes on and on!
  • Medical Imaging
  • Programmable Pace Maker
  • Lightning Warning System
  • Cordless Hand Tools
  • Ear Thermometer
  • Smoke Detector
  • Fire Fighter Equipment
  • Invisible Braces
  • Satellite Dish
  • Composite Materials
  • Advanced Plastics
  • Laser Angioplasty
  • Scratch Resistant Lenses
  • Water Purification Systems
  • Air Quality Monitor
slide38

Shuttle Statistics

http://www.spaceflight.nasa.gov/shuttle/reference/basics/index.html

Two Inch Universe

http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/seuforum/einstein/resources_ed.htm

Earth, Moon, Mars: Gravity Jugs

http://www.nsschapters.org/hub/gravityjugs.htm

Mars Activity Book from JPL

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/classroom/pdfs/MSIP-MarsActivities.pdf

Mars 101 – PowerPoint

http://imaginemars.jpl.nasa.gov/info/multimedia.html

Mars Info

http://www.solarviews.com/eng/mars.htm

Animation for Earth and Mars Orbits

http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/mars/mars_orbit.html

slide39

Planet scale

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/K12/planetsize/planetsize.html

http://cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/AtHomeAstronomy/activity_10.html

http://www.noao.edu/education/peppercorn/pcmain.html

Solar System Exploration

http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/index.cfm

Exploring the Moon – NASA Educator Guide

http://ares.jsc.nasa.gov/Education/Activities/ExpMoon/DistanceMoon.pdf

Spinoffs

http://www.thespaceplace.com/nasa/spinoffs.html

American Perception of Space Exploration- Presentation 21 April 2004, Washington, DC

http://www.culturalanalysis.com/Default.htm

NASA spending priority

http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/news_opinion_positionpage/2007/02/should_nasa_be_.html

slide40

Leesa Hubbard

Educator/Aerospace Enthusiast

Wilson County Schools, Tennessee

AstroPoet@aol.com

ad