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Wartime Propaganda. Committee of Public Information (George Creel). Purposes – Unite public behind war effort Attract men to enlist in army Influence citizens to actively support war effort (buy bonds, conserve, etc) and put pressure on others to refrain from anything considered anti-war.

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slide1

Wartime

Propaganda

committee of public information george creel
Committee of Public Information (George Creel)
  • Purposes –
    • Unite public behind war effort
    • Attract men to enlist in army
    • Influence citizens to actively support war effort (buy bonds, conserve, etc) and put pressure on others to refrain from anything considered anti-war
propaganda
Propaganda
  • Media that uses carefully-crafted messages to manipulate people’s actions and beliefs
  • It has one purpose, and one purpose only: to persuade you.
  • They use biased, or one-sided, messages and are designed to appeal to peoples’ emotions instead of their judgment and reasoning.
propaganda techniques
Propaganda Techniques
  • Testimonials
  • Bandwagon
  • Name-Calling
  • Glittering Generalities
  • Card Stacking
  • Plain Folks
  • Transfer
testimonials
Testimonials
  • Testimonials usually involve celebrities or other respected people endorsing, or officially supporting, a product or idea.
  • The person giving the testimonial could be famous, knowledgeable about the product (such as a doctor talking about medicine), or just an ordinary person who claims the product has worked for them.
  • Beware, though, because people are usually paid to give endorsements.
  • Ask yourself: Who is quoted in the testimonial? Is this person actually an expert about this product or idea? Does the product or idea have value without the testimony or endorsement?
bandwagon
Bandwagon
  • Jumping on the bandwagon” describes people choosing to go along with the rest of the crowd.
  • Bandwagon propaganda creates the impression that there is widespread support for a thing or idea.
  • Peer Pressure
name calling
Name-Calling
  • Name-calling is exactly what it sounds like: using negative words and bad names to create fear and dislike for people, ideas, or institutions.
  • Can be verbal or visual (shows a person or thing in an unflattering way).
glittering generalities
Glittering Generalities
  • Glittering generalities use simple, clever slogans that appeal to peoples’ emotions.
  • This technique always shows the subject of the message in a positive light, but provides little or no information.
  • Easy to remember, but hard to verify.
card stacking
Card Stacking
  • Card stacking uses facts and figures to show one side as positive and the other side as negative.
  • This technique is designed to make you think you are hearing both sides. In reality, you are actually hearing only one perspective.
plain folks
Plain Folks
  • The plain folks technique is designed to send the message that a product or person is “just like you.”
  • Politicians have their picture taken visiting coffee shops, riding on tractors, and doing other things that everyday people do.
transfer
Transfer
  • The transfer technique uses your feelings about one thing to get you to feel the same way about something else.
  • Transfer can use a positive image to persuade you to like something or a negative image to persuade you to dislike something.
  • Ex: The US flag to seem patriotic, baby penguin to seem loveable, diseased skin in anti-smoking campaign, etc.
propaganda analysis
Propaganda Analysis
  • Group Activity
  • 7 groups
  • iPads
  • Go to hintonhistory.weebly.com
    • Unit 7
    • War Propoganda
slide16

Attacks on

Civil Liberties

government excess threats to the civil liberties of americans
Government Excess & Threats to the Civil Liberties of Americans
  • Espionage Act– 1917
    • Forbade actions that obstructed recruitment or efforts to promote insubordination in the military.
    • Ordered the Postmaster General to remove Leftist materials from the mail.
    • Fines of up to $10,000 and/or up to 20 years in prison.
government excess threats to the civil liberties of americans1
Government Excess & Threats to the Civil Liberties of Americans

2.Sedition Act– 1918- it was a crime to speak against the purchase of war bonds or willfully utter, print, write or publish any disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive languageabout this form of US Govt., the US Constitution, or the US armed forces or to willfully urge, incite, or advocate any curtailment of production of things necessary or essential to the prosecution of the war…with intent of such curtailment to cripple or hinder, the US in the prosecution of the war.

slide19

New

Social/Economic

Opportunities

opportunities for african americans in ww1
Opportunities for African-Americans in WW1
  • War industries work
    • “Great Migration.” 1916 – 1919  NORTH
  • Enlistment in segregated units.
slide34

3. New American

Immigrants

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