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NP-ILN 21 st May 2013. Using Data to Improve student Achievement. The initiative depends upon the effective establishment, within and across systems and schools, of a continuous learning culture where data is viewed as an essential and important part of improving student learning.

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Np iln 21 st may 2013

NP-ILN

21st May 2013

Using Data to Improve student Achievement


Np improving literacy and numeracy

The initiative depends upon the effective establishment, within and across systems and schools, of a continuous learning culture where data is viewed as an essential and important part of improving student learning.

Decision-making about curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment must be based on reliable and valid data.

The coaches within participating Catholic schools will work with leaders and teachers in developing data analysis and interrogation skills and implementing whole-school approaches to literacy and numeracy development.

National Partnership Agreement on Improving Literacy & Numeracy – Queensland Implementation Plan

NP-Improving Literacy and Numeracy


Current practice

• What student data do you currently collect?

• How do you use this data to direct teaching and learning ?

• Does current practice improve student

achievement?

Current Practice


Why collect data

Best practice would dictate that we cannot meet students’

educational needs if we do not know what their needs are.

What do the students already know? - What can they

already do? What do they need to know, learn and do?

Baseline data is used

~ to inform where a student is currently performing

~ for a comparison of knowledge gained to show growth

~ to provide guidance for teachers to plan future teaching

and learning

• Result – IMPROVED STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Why Collect Data?


How to record data

Data needs to be accessible yet secure

~ all teaching staff need to have easy access

~ for privacy reasons it needs to be stored so it can only be

accessed by approved staff

Data needs to be meaningful

~ raw scores linked to school benchmarks

~ teachers test to gain an insight into how each student thinks

and learns

Data needs to be easily recorded

~ to be user friendly and time efficient egnumbers only

This data does not replace the teachers’ own assessment records – this still needs to happen consistently across the school

How to Record Data


Using the data

The purpose for collecting the data is to use it to improve student achievement.

Processes need to be clear and effective if the end result is to be achieved.

Agreed practice is aligned to classroom programming and planning agreed practice.

Using the Data


Practicalities

Take time - This process will take a year or two to implement and refine

Help staff to acknowledge that while there is work involved, the results are worth it

The data collected will not only help to improve student achievement but will provide data that gives evidence about your teaching and learning program

Practicalities


Collaborative inquiry

Goals and targets

Collect Data

Interrogate

Infer

Verify

Goals and targets

Plan

Implement

Assess

Reflect

http://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=48844

Collaborative Inquiry


Naplan test data
NAPLAN TEST DATA

ITEM LEVEL SUMMARY REPORT

STUDENTS AT TIME OF TEST

OR

CURRENT STUDENTS ?


Naplan testing
NAPLAN TESTING

NEW TEST EACH YEAR – aligned to ACARA – normed around 500 scale points

National % correct – shows easy to hard

ITEM LEVEL SUMMARY

ITEM LEVEL RESPONSE

USE SORT FUNCTIONS (Sunlanda)

Y3,5,7,9 only – set time, strict conditions

Support materials – QSA, NSW

Queensland Studies Authority – NAPLAN Data Results and Sunlanda


Pat testing
PAT TESTING

SAME TEST – aligned to ACARA (PAT –R)

ITEM DIFFICULTY RATING – shows easy to hard

Normed data – stanines, scale scores

School controls timing and conditions

Based on Data collected in September

Once or twice per year

Support materials are available

ACER- PAT-R, PAT-M and other support materials


Overlayed model for using student data to inform teaching learning
Overlayed model for using student data to inform teaching & learning

Implementing, monitoring results

Verifying causes

Verify

Reflect

Infer

Assess

Identifying student learning problems

Implementing, monitoring results

Goals and targets

Interrogate

Implement

Collect

Plan

Building foundations

Generating solutions


Some questions to consider

Q. Which questions do you expect your students to do well? learning

Which errors should be easiest to re-teach or “fix-up”?

Why did students get easy questions wrong?

How many questions do you focus on when reviewing test results?

How do you choose which questions to focus on?

Some Questions to consider?


Why focus on the easier questions first

Most students should get the easy Qs right learning

Easy questions are the simplest to re-teach

Many errors in easy questions are misunderstandings and misinterpretations

Easy questions are often the foundation knowledge for harder questions

You get more “bang for your buck” by focussing on the simpler errors in terms of “moving” data

Why focus on the Easier Questions FIRST


Backwards forwards
Backwards/Forwards learning

Looking backwards – ie, fixing up problem areas after the data comes in

Preparation for the next NAPLAN test by selective focus on “historically weak areas” or trends identified over time

Looking forwards – ie, planning future work with emphasis on strengthening identified and verified weaknesses

A number of the above slides have been adapted from the power point presented at the ‘Darling Downs Regional Conference 2012: Putting Pedagogy into Practice: Using Data to Improve Teaching & Learning


Web links

QSA NAPLAN test analysis 2013 learning

http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au/27087.html

NSW NAPLAN 2012 strategies

http://www.schools.nsw.edu.au/learning/7-12assessments/naplan/teachstrategies/yr2012/

AC Teaching English

http://www.teachingacenglish.edu.au/explicit-teaching/reading/explicit-teaching-reading-year-3.html

Web links


Np iln

  • Data-driven practice learningwill be at the core of each sectors’ coaching activities.

  • Coaches will increase teachers’ and schools’ capacity to use data and analysis to identify:

    • gaps in student knowledge;

    • student intervention and support needs and approaches;

    • improvements needed to instructional practices; and

    • where improvement in student outcomes has been made.

  • National Partnership Agreement on Improving Literacy & Numeracy – Queensland Implementation Plan

NP- ILN


Where to now

  • Look at the data from one year level at your school learning

  • Interrogate and Infer:

    • Gaps in student knowledge by looking at specific test questions that were identified in your data collection and identifying which concepts/ processes need to be highlighted

    • improvements needed to instructional practices that need to be addressed with the teachers from these gaps.

Where to now?


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