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Conditioning novel block design construction. Conditioning Novel Behavior in Porpoises. Behavioral Interpretation of Memory. David C. Palmer. Experimental analysis vs. Interpretation. Experimental analysis Manipulation of independent variables and study effect on DV Interpretation

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Experimental analysis vs interpretation

Experimental analysis vs. Interpretation

Experimental analysis

Manipulation of independent variables and study effect on DV

Interpretation

Explaining a phenomenon using known principles

Helpful in complex arrangements that may be impossible to analyze


Memory

Memory?

Storage metaphor

Traditional theories of memory appeal to experiences stored in “memory banks”, etc.

Then, we recall a memory by retrieving the experience from our “memory”

Memories are sometimes stored as “copies”


Memory1

Memory?

Behavioral view

Memory is a behavioral phenomenon

Memories are stimulus control relations that survive across time

For example, child learns to name “pencil”: is then able to name it the next day

Forgetting therefore is the weakening of a behavioral relation over time


Memory2

Memory?

Another angle: The behavior of “remembering” may also be a result of problem solving

Problem:

Responses are in the repertoire

SDs are present that signal reinforcement is forthcoming and EO is present

The response is not under direct control of current stimuli


Memory3

Memory?

Example: What did you have for breakfast yesterday?

“Pancakes” is in the repertoire as a tact

Reinforcement is scheduled for the answer

But, “pancakes” has not been conditioned directly to “What did you have for breakfast yesterday” – not an intraverbal

To emit the response, two elements must obtain: 1) Person must get supplementary stimuli to evoke response, and 2) must recognize it as correct


Memory4

Memory?

Exploratory VB – self probes

“What did I do yesterday? Hmm… got up, took a shower, and then… oh yes, I made some cereal

Conditioned seeing

Assume that perceptual behavior (seeing) is conditioned as we emit it and can be evoked by accompanying stimuli

That is, we may “see” ourselves coming out of the shower, going to the kitchen, and getting the cereal


Memory5

Memory?

Conditioned seeing (cont’d)

Note that conditioned seeing is evoked by current stimuli that may be associated with the seeing – “Now what did I do this AM…”We“see” the kitchen and some of the stimuli that were present

How do we recognize that it is correct?

We may respond to its strength: “I am sure that I had cereal”

The conditioned seeing may evoke other vivid conditioned seeing that is strong to confirm


Memory6

Memory?

Main point: to remember is to provide supplementary stimuli to yourself using exploratory VB and conditioned seeing




  • You are discussing a case with a VE teacher who is taking her first course in the ABA sequence at FIT. The issue at hand is a kid’s tantrums. The teacher explains the tantrums in the following way: “He is having these tantrums because of frustration.”

  • What kind of faulty explanation is this?

  • Please describe the feedback that you would provide to her.


You decide to work on the case described above. The descriptive analysis information suggests that the tantrums occur because in the past, such behavior has been followed by attention. Design an FA that would test this hypothesis.


Critique the following the data shows that the behavior has improved quite dramatically

Critique the following: descriptive analysis information suggests that the tantrums occur because in the past, such behavior has been followed by attention. Design an FA that would test this hypothesis.“The data shows that the behavior has improved quite dramatically.”



Uh Oh… mother has decided that the drug causes too much sedation, and immediately terminates the drug administration.

  • Personality trait

  • “I wanna be sedated…”

  • ½ life of drug

  • DOE

  • FCN

  • Extinction

  • COD

  • Self control (Lab)

  • Conc superstition

  • RTE

  • Spontaneous recovery

  • Functional equivalence

  • Operant

  • Most to least

  • Memory

  • EO

  • Conditioned seeing

  • Problem

  • Emotion

  • Meaning

  • Anxiety

  • Self control (Skinner)

  • Rate

  • Epigentics

  • Punctuated equilibrium

  • Pairwise FA

  • Diphtheria

  • 3 levels of selection


Behaviorists think that we don t have emotion bad behaviorists

mother has decided that the drug causes too much sedation, and immediately terminates the drug administration. Behaviorists Think That We Don’t Have Emotion! Bad Behaviorists!”


End of faux comps 1

End of Faux Comps #1 mother has decided that the drug causes too much sedation, and immediately terminates the drug administration.


Comps faux 2

Comps (Faux) #2 mother has decided that the drug causes too much sedation, and immediately terminates the drug administration.


Behaviorists don t deal with thinking

mother has decided that the drug causes too much sedation, and immediately terminates the drug administration. Behaviorists Don’t Deal with Thinking!”


  • You are working with a teacher who is teaching the letters of the alphabet. She is using cards with the letter and a picture of an item that if spelled out, would start with the letter in question. For example, the “A” card has an apple on it, the “B” card has a bat on it, etc. The kids are responding well to each card. The teacher asks you one day “Hey I wonder if the kids are attending to the letter or the picture of each card?”

  • First, explain to her what “attention” means.

  • Then, design an experiment that will answer her question.

  • Finally, what EAB study provides the basis for your experiment?


Behaviorists don t consider feelings

of the alphabet. She is using cards with the letter and a picture of an item that if spelled out, would start with the letter in question. For example, the Behaviorists Don’t Consider Feelings!”


  • You are working with a 40 year old male who exhibits aggression and property destruction. There is a behavior program in place to address the behaviors, and there is a full complement of medications. One of the meds is Risperdol.

  • What class is the drug?

  • You are discussing the med with staff, and wish to alert them about possible side effects. What are these?

  • What NT is involved?


  • You design a Tx package that involves a DRI schedule in which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

  • How is the DRI interval set?

  • Set up an experiment that would show the Tx is effective

  • Set up an experiment that disentangles the attention from the contingency between staying on task and attention


Uh Oh… which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

  • Emotional operations

  • Taste aversion

  • AO

  • Tact private events

  • Inductive reasoning

  • Values

  • Correlational study

  • 4 humours

  • Measure: following directions

  • Positive contrast

  • IRT

  • Constructional approach

  • Resp extinction

  • Time delay prompt fading

  • PR 50

  • Reversal design

  • Projection

  • Formal probe

  • Dependent variable

  • Verbal summator

  • Punishment contrast

  • Conditioned suppression

  • Creativity source

  • Projective tests

  • Operant seeing

  • Wit

  • Exact count IOA

  • Behavior momentum


End Faux Comps #2 which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).


Comps (Faux) #3 which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).


IOA vs Accuracy which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).


Critique the following: which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

“The criteria for the experiment was changed, and it was modified by the experimenter.”


Elements of program organized by function… which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).


Critique the following: which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

“The experimenter re-designed the study quickly, and then began anew.”


Case #1: which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

There is a case on which you are consulting. The client is a 25 year old female who frequently throws items in the house. The have been many functional analyses of the behavior over the years, but there are no conclusive results. However, one hypothesis is that the behavior produces automatic reinforcement in the form of the sight/sound of the item hitting the floor. Design an FA to test this hypothesis. Do not try and separate the effects of the sight vs the sound of the item hitting the floor. Only test whether or not that event, the sight/sound of the item hitting the floor, is maintaining the behavior.


Explanations: which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

You are working on a case with another graduate student in ABA. A particularly difficult situation is being discussed, and the behavior involves some elopement. Your friend explains the behavior with statements such as this: “She is running away to get some PVC pipes that her neighbor has in his garage.” Critique this explanation of behavior, and offer an alternative explanation.


Critique the following: which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

The data were graphed by the behavior analyst very precisely.


Factors that influence RTE which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).


Yikes… which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

  • Rights

  • Reinforcement trap

  • Brief FA

  • Drug as AO

  • Behavioral view of drug abuse

  • Conc FR 50 VI 1’

  • Pairwise FA

  • Resurgence

  • 3 characteristics of graphed data

  • Relationship

  • Multiple probe

  • Endorphin theory of SIB

  • Siegel morphine tolerance

  • We feel free when…

  • Pattern in FR 50

  • FI 1’

  • Holz & Azrin view of pun

  • Conditioned suppression

  • Hold responsible

  • Drug as EO

  • 3 levels of selection

  • When we give credit

  • 4 facts about drugs

  • Draw negative contrast

  • “…I’m in need of some restraint…”

  • Mean count per interval IOA

  • Drug as a positive reinf


The End which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).


Comps (Faux) #4 which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).


Case #1 which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

You are working in a vocational training center with several staff who are charged with implementing a behavior program. You are interested in treatment fidelity (or integrity). You have a procedure that you think will improve fidelity that involves feedback and incentives. Design an experiment that will test the efficacy of the treatment on Tx fidelity.


Real life respondent conditioning: which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

Diagram an example of respondent conditioning using the relevant terms.


which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes). Why do people get depressed?”


Case #2: which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

There is a case on which you are consulting. The client is a 25 year old female who frequently throws items in the house. The have been many functional analyses of the behavior over the years, but there are no conclusive results. However, one hypothesis is that the behavior produces automatic reinforcement in the form of the sight/sound of the item hitting the floor. Design an FA to test this hypothesis. Do not try and separate the effects of the sight vs the sound of the item hitting the floor. Only test whether or not that event, the sight/sound of the item hitting the floor, is maintaining the behavior.


which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes). Behavior analysts don’t believe in freedom”


I knew this would happen… which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).

  • Intrinsic motivation

  • Anger

  • Repression

  • Encourage maintenance

  • Back chaining

  • MSWO

  • PSI

  • Momentary DRO

  • Interdependent group

  • DRL x 2

  • Reactivity

  • Systematic replication

  • Trigger analysis

  • Nominal fallacy

  • Divided attention

  • NCR mechanism of effect

  • Diff between neg pun & ext

  • Diff between EO and SD

  • 2 repertoires in problem

  • Program generalization

  • DRH x 2

  • Concept formation

  • Adjusting ratio

  • Escape/avoid hierarchy

  • 3 characteristics of behavior

  • Sequence analysis

  • Independent group

  • Behavioral analyst

  • SDP

  • Reification


Design a reinforcer assessment of attention from parent which attention is delivered for staying on task for a period of time (e.g., 5 minutes).



Sensory defensiveness Do the following:


Do the following:Behavior analysts deny the existence of the mind”


Do the following:Behavior analysts can’t explain creative achievements”


The End Do the following:


Comps (Faux) #5 Do the following:


You are collecting rate data on a problem behavior (e.g., aggression), and a 2nd observer is also collecting data. Demonstrate (draw the bins, etc) the mean count-per-interval method to compute the IOA. You don’t have to use a large number of intervals, as 5 will suffice.


You are in a discussion of reinforcement. The discussant informs you that the use of artificial reinforcers is ill-advised. Indeed, he argues that reinforcers devalue intrinsic motivation. Your response to this is…


Behaviorists are all wrong. Their data and procedures are based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


Mand training: based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!

Therapist holds up a food item and asks “What do you want?”


Ready, set, go… based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!

  • Mix FR 50 FI 2’

  • Pyramid model of training

  • Staff training: Procedures

  • Counter control

  • 2 targets of monitoring

  • How to get maintenance

  • VT

  • Between subject yoking

  • Reflexivity

  • Metaphor

  • Stimulus generalization

  • Simultaneous prompts

  • Shadowing

  • Schedule induced behavior

  • Ratio strain

  • Relationship

  • Coercion

  • Tan FT 3’ DRO 1’

  • Celeration

  • Latency

  • Competency based training

  • Within subject yoking

  • Transitivity

  • Task interspersal

  • Superstitious behavior

  • Spatial fading

  • Delayed prompts

  • Lab example of self control

  • Response differentiation

  • Modeling


The End based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


Comps (Faux) #6 based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


Social Validity based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


Group contingencies based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


Ready, set, go… based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!

  • Chain FR 50 FR 100

  • Agonist

  • General case analysis

  • MDRO

  • DRH x2

  • Direct instruction

  • Contingent effort

  • Informed consent

  • Fair pair

  • Celeration computation

  • PIR IOA

  • Permanent product

  • Analysis vs interpretation

  • Conditioned seeing

  • Incidental teaching

  • Atypical anti-pychotics

  • W/D from alcohol

  • Pattern of FI

  • Teach point to A vs B errorlessly

  • Differential reinforcement

  • Behavioral momentum

  • Functional goals

  • WIR

  • Response class co-variation

  • Intermingle of contingencies of reinf and survival

  • Operant seeing


Treatment of self stimulatory behavior based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


Behavioral interpretation of memory based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


Assessment of high intensity problem behavior based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


Techniques of governmental control based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


The End based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!


Chapter 19 thinking

  • Advantages of VB: based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!

    • Extends senses of listener

    • Extends action possibilities of speaker

Chapter 19: Thinking


Chapter 19 thinking1

  • A full account of VB must include based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!“covert verbal behavior”:

  • Covert VB is involved in problem solving, thinking, etc.

  • Why is VB sometimes covert?

    • May avoid punishment

    • Less effort

    • Controlling variables may be weak

Chapter 19: Thinking


Chapter 19 thinking2

  • Thinking: based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!

    • Is behavior!

    • Can be overt or covert

    • Involves speaking and listening by the same person

    • Is behavior that produces its own reinforcement

Chapter 19: Thinking


Chapter 19 thinking3

  • Example: based on studying rats and pigeons, for goodness sake!

  • Someone tells you that your client is having some major tantrums. You observe the tantrums and engage in some thinking.

Chapter 19: Thinking


Chapter 19 thinking4

Chapter 19: Thinking


Chapter 19 thinking5

  • Intraverbals arise from tacts: that you just saw.“Now if he is in timeout, maybe that is reinforcing tantrums”

  • The intraverbals evoke visualizations of previous cases of tantrums in task in which escape extinction was used

Chapter 19: Thinking


Chapter 19 thinking6

  • You ask yourself out loud: that you just saw.“Hey, is there any other evidence of tantrums that escape tasks with this kid?”

  • You respond with: “Yep, I saw a couple in his classroom”

  • These behaviors end with “These tantrums produce escape!”

Chapter 19: Thinking


Chapter 19 thinking7

Chapter 19: Thinking


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