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Aboriginal Cultural Education. PROGRAM VISION “to provide support for Aboriginal communities, through a culturally inclusive learning environment”. Welcome to Country. Uncle Des Dyer of the Darug Nation Secretary of the Darug Tribal Aboriginal Corporation.

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Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Aboriginal Cultural Education

PROGRAM VISION“to provide support for Aboriginal communities, through a culturally inclusive learning environment”


Welcome to country

Welcome to Country

Uncle Des Dyer

of the Darug Nation

Secretary of the

Darug Tribal Aboriginal Corporation


Aboriginal cultural education course overview

Aboriginal Cultural EducationCourse Overview

Unit 1 -Demonstrate a general understanding of traditional Aboriginal cultures and cultural diversity

Unit 2 -Identify impacts of colonisation on current issues of service delivery to Aboriginal people

Unit 3 -Demonstrate protocols and processes to collaborate in genuine partnerships


Unit 1

Unit 1

Demonstrate a general understanding of traditional Aboriginal cultures and cultural diversity

Outcomes:

  • Describe the Dreaming and its central importance to the

  • creation of Aboriginal culture

  • Explain the importance of the relationship between Aboriginal

  • people and the land

  • Describe the role ceremonies and rituals have in linking people

  • to the land and each other.

  • Assessment:

  • Portfolio containing at least one item for each of the three topic areas

  • Examples of portfolio items:

  • Artwork, Music, Photos and Article


Unit 2

Unit 2

  • Identify impacts of colonisation on issues of service delivery to Aboriginal people

    Outcomes:

  • Describe a range of Aboriginal issues that has derived from

  • European colonisation of Australia

  • Indentify culturally inclusive strategies in work practices that

  • value Aboriginal peoples and their culture.

  • Assessment: - 500 Word Report

  • Choose one past or present issue that has impacted Aboriginal peoples and how does this effect your service delivery.

  • Examples of issues:

  • Access to education, Employment and health services


Unit 3

Unit 3

  • Demonstrate protocols and processes to collaborate in genuine partnerships

    Outcomes:

  • Establish and maintain genuine partnerships with Aboriginal people

  • Identity key components of genuine collaborative relationships

  • Demonstrate appropriate protocols and processes required to work in genuine partnership with Aboriginal organisations and/or communities

  • Assessment: - Written Action Plan or Flowchart

  • You are to choose one of the following Scenario’s:

  • Scenario 1

  • You’re planning an event which involves Aboriginal Elders and community members. List the process you would follow to create a collaborative partnership.

  • Scenario 2

  • The local Aboriginal Community wants to establish a training program. List the process you would follow to create a collaborative partnership.


Assessment task

Assessment Task

Due Date: 18th June 08

Aboriginal Education & Training Unit

Miller College, South Western Sydney Institute TAFE

Cnr Banks & Hoxton Park Rd, NSW 2168

Phone: (02) 9825 7429

Fax: (02) 9825 7458

Mob: 0430 040 144

E-mail: [email protected]


Section 1 living and lifestyle

Section 1 - Living and Lifestyle


Building your community

Building your Community

Activity 1

In your groups briefly discuss;

  • What is needed in your community to maintain your current living standards?

    Then draw an ideal community map on the paper provided.

    Examples of services you may need in your community

  • Houses

  • Shopping Centres

  • Water Catchments

  • Education Centres

  • Cathedral


Diversity of regions

Diversity of Regions

Activity 2.1

In your group’s folder ;

Region of Australia

On the opponent side of your community drawing

List the unique attributes to this area prior to 1788 (First Fleet)

Four topic areas to cover ;

  • Climate – What is the weather like?

  • Landscape – What is the terrain like?

  • Vegetation /Animals – What plant and animal live here?

  • Technology – What resources do we need to survive here?

  • (Please only use half the page)


Diversity of regions continued

Diversity of Regions continued

Activity 2.2

Region of Australia

With the other half of the page

List what do you think consisted in the day to day life for Aboriginal people in that environment?

Three topic areas to cover ;

  • Male

  • Female

  • Children


Diversity of regions continued1

Diversity of Regions continued

Activity 2.3

Region of Australia

On the side of your community drawing

  • Place your region name on top of your community map

  • Each group member;

  • Write your first name in your favourite location in your community; followed by a plant or animal distinctive to your region

  • As a group present your community to the other participants

  • Presentation to include;

  • Describe attributes and life in your community prior to 1788

  • Outline your current community

  • State you full community name (first name followed by plant or animal)

  • Say why is this your preferred location in your community


Morning tea

Morning Tea


Aboriginal nations

Aboriginal Nations

Aboriginal Australia ;

There are 500 different

Aboriginal language

groups and nations.

General characteristics:

  • Own language and/or dialect.

  • Have distinct name eg Darug, Bundjalung and Wiradjuri

  • Have customs and laws, cultural practices and protocols

  • which often vary from neighbouring groups.

  • Have their own beliefs, stories, ceremonies and totems

  • Have unique ways of expressing, demonstrating and

  • sharing their culture.


Aboriginal nations south western sydney institute

Aboriginal Nations South Western Sydney Institute

Three Nations in the Southeast region:

  • Darug (Dharug)

  • Gundungurra

  • Dharawal (Tharawal)


Warning invasion new community

WARNINGINVASION - NEW COMMUNITY

Evolution Activity – Aboriginal English


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Aboriginal English

Hey! Bra see the goldfish?

Them no goldfish

Yes they are!

I see their Beady eyes

ABR, C DA Goldfish

M NO Goldfish

YESAR

IC, D BD I’s


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Welcome To Country

  • A “Welcome to Country” is where the Aboriginal Custodians welcome people to their land.

  • The performing of a “Welcome to Country” ceremonies are wide and diverse and can vary according to the region.

  • It is important that the Aboriginal Custodians are comfortable with the event arrangements.

    “Welcome to Country ceremonies is a right of the local Aboriginal Custodians not a privilege”


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Knowing the Protocol

In the past,

It’s been common practice to acknowledge the Aboriginal Local Land Councils as the custodians of the land.

However, Aboriginal Local Land Councils are organisations setup to aide with capacity building for Aboriginal people and in most cases are

NOT THE CUSTODIANS OF THE LAND

Aboriginal Local Land Councils can be used as a gateway to get in contact with the custodians of the land


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Acknowledgement of Country

“Acknowledgement of Country” is a way that the wider community can demonstrate respect for Aboriginal protocols and can be performed by anyone that is participating in any event

Examples of “Acknowledgment of Country” could be:

Example 1:

I would like to show my respect and acknowledge the traditional

custodians of the land, of elders past and present, on which this

meeting takes place.

Example 2:

I would like to acknowledge the _____________ people who are

the traditional custodians of this land. I would also like to pay respect

to the elders both past and present of the _______________ nation

and extend that respect to other Aboriginal people present.

Source: Welcome to Country and Acknowledgement of Country: Guidelines and Protocols for NSW Public Schools and TAFE NSW Institutes.


Warning new government fingernail policy

WARNING:New GovernmentFINGERNAIL POLICY

Removal of community members with fingernails


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Getting it Right - Referencing

  • The term “Aboriginal” refers to the original inhabitants of thisCountry. (does not include Torres Strait Islanders or people who are born in Australian)

  • The term “Indigenous” is used to incorporate both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

  • In most cases “Indigenous” is used for national issues/programs, whereas “Aboriginal” is used for state issues/programs.

  • It’s favourable to say ‘Aboriginal person’ rather than ‘Aborigine’

  • Some Aboriginal peoples dislike being described by the term "Indigenous” (flora and fauna)

  • Some Aboriginal peoples dislike being described by the term “Aboriginal”


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Getting it Right - Referencing

Terms Aboriginal peoples use,

  • “Koori” is generally used in NSW and the ACT

  • “Goori” is used in North Eastern NSW

  • “Murri” is used in Queensland and North inland NSW

  • “Koorie” is generally used in Victoria

  • “Nunga” is used in parts of South Australia

  • “Palawa” is used in Tasmania

  • Some Aboriginal peoples do not like to use these terms


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

What Do You Use?

If unsure,

Use generic terms such as “Aboriginal”

until you confirm what’s most appropriate.

There is no harm in asking!

People are generally happy to respond to

questions if they are asked respectfully and

genuinely.

‘As a general rule’ – only use the terms you

have personally checked out with people

that you know and have a relationship with.


Role of elders and darug history

Role of Elders and Darug History


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Role of Elders and Darug History

Uncle Des Dyer

of the Darug Nation

Secretary of the

Darug Tribal Aboriginal Corporation


Warning new government hair policy

WARNING:New GovernmentHAIR POLICY

Removal of community members with lighter coloured hair

(cannot be a member from the Fingernail Policy)


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Lunch


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Dreamtime and Dreaming

The expression 'Dreamtime' is most often used to refer to the 'time before time', or 'the time of the creation of all things',

'Dreaming' is often used to refer to the current and unbroken link that Aboriginal peoples have with creation

Law & Lore

“The Spirit Ancestors of the Dreaming set down

the Law governing Aboriginal peoples.”

“Aboriginal lore is the learning and transmission of

cultural heritage.”


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Kinship System (NT model)

Aboriginal Kinship is a multi-level system which

identifies cultural subgroups;

  • skin groups

  • moieties

  • totems

  • language groups

    Kinship systems enable:

  • behavioural patterns towards Aboriginal community members

  • obligations towards food sharing, shelter, information giving, teaching and so on

  • obligations towards spiritual protection and caring for sacred sites


Warning new government mission policy

WARNING:New GovernmentMISSION POLICY

Only two communities may operate


Kinship system

Kinship System

In a moiety system the society is divided into

two halves.

Every thing in a person’s moiety is regarded as a ‘relation’.

Skin Group - It is a highly complex structure, in

some cases going into 16 generational levels.

The skin group determines:

  • Marriage - prevents incest because you must marry someone from a different skin group

  • Behaviour - How you address members of communities


Kinship system1

Kinship System

  • A man who is a member of A must marry a woman who is a member of B

  • A man who is a member of C must marry a woman who is a member of D

  • When a couple from A & B have a child, that child will become a member of C or D

  • Father line:

  • If A is a male then his children will be a member of C. If B is a male then the child is a member of D


Kinship video

Kinship Video

Exploring Aboriginal Kinship

Episode 2

Video


Kinship family structure

Kinship Family Structure


Kinship family structure1

Kinship Family Structure

Aunt can only be your father's sister.

Uncle canonly be your mother's brother.

The mother's sister is called "mother" as well, and not "aunt".

The father's brother is called "father", not uncle.

Ego calls his/her mother’s sister - "mother", he will obviously call herchildren "brother and sister", and not cousin.

The same is true for your father's brother's children.

The only persons called "cousins" are the children of your Mother's Brother and your Father's Sister.


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Afternoon Tea


219 years has past in your two communities

219 Years Has Past In Your Two Communities


Government plan community reconstruction

Government Plan - Community Reconstruction

Communities Consultation


Consultation with community

Consultation with Community

Activity 3

The facilitator has been ask to conduct research on the local communities.

Questions:

What’s your first community?

What’s your community name?

What was some of the activities you did as child in your community?

What was some of the activities you did as an adult in your community?


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Genocide by Another Name

Assimilation Series

Video


Program vision to provide support for aboriginal communities through a culturally inclusive learning environment

Rapid WriteQuickly write for 3 mins (without your pen leaving your paper) about today's community exercise


From each according to his abilities to each according to his needs karl marx 1875

Aboriginal Cultural Education

"From each, according to his abilities, to each according to his needs" Karl Marx (1875)

THANK YOU FOR TODAY


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