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DOSSIER WORKSHOP. 3 rd , 4 th , & 5th Year Retention Eileen Barrett Office of Faculty Development 12-07-06. Tips for Compiling Your Retention Dossier. Due: January 15 th. SEVEN BASIC TIPS FROM SUE SCHAEFER. START NOW & DON’T STOP APPEARANCES COUNT FOCUS ON THE DOCUMENTS EXPLAIN

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dossier workshop

DOSSIER WORKSHOP

3rd, 4th, & 5th Year Retention

Eileen Barrett

Office of Faculty Development

12-07-06

seven basic tips from sue schaefer
SEVEN BASIC TIPS FROM SUE SCHAEFER
  • START NOW & DON’T STOP
  • APPEARANCES COUNT
  • FOCUS ON THE DOCUMENTS
  • EXPLAIN
  • USE PROBLEMS POSITIVELY
  • ASK FOR ADVICE
  • DON’T DRAW CONCLUSIONS
1 start now don t stop
1. Start Now & Don’t Stop
  • Tenure is a cumulative process; it recognizes accomplishments & anticipates your future contributions. Promotion recognizes accomplishments
  • Include an up-to-date and complete c.v.
  • Use selected evidence to show your ongoing development & achievements
  • Include a narrative that explains & directs the reader to appropriate evidence
focus substance
FOCUS & SUBSTANCE
  • Exclude redundant material
  • Use representative instructional materials
  • Include substantive evidence of student achievement
  • Include recent versions of scholarly work
  • Make the dossier lean & mean
2 appearances
2. APPEARANCES

Typical size would be two binders and a third for student evaluations

+

appearances
APPEARANCES
  • Use between one and three binders & put your name on all sides (remember: focus & substance)
  • Include an index of all materials in the dossier
  • Organize your materials within the 5 categories: degree, instructional, professional, internal service, external service
  • Use legible font, clean materials
  • Use readable tabs, use 4.0 numbering
  • Invite your audience to read your materials
3 focus on the documents
3. FOCUS ON THE DOCUMENTS
  • Read and refer to the Promotion, Tenure, and Retention (PTR) document
    • Be aware of the expectations & criteria (see 4.0 general; see 6.0 tenure; 8.0 promotion to associate; 9.0 promotion to full)
    • Know that instructional (1) and professional (2) achievement have highest priority
    • Understand the profile approach (See 1.0 Introductory Statement)
    • Check the deadlines
  • Review your Personnel Action File (PAF) and each year’s retention letters
personnel action file paf
Maintained by The Office of Academic Affairs

Designated Custodian: Provost & Vice President of Academic Affairs

Call to schedule an appoint to review your PAF (before Feb. 1)

Ms. Gina Traversa

Warren Hall 945, 885-3714

PAF

PERSONNEL ACTION FILE (PAF)
promotion tenure and retention policy and procedures document
Promotion, Tenure, and Retention Policy and Procedures Document

Explains the policies and procedures

Describes the criteria for retention, tenure, and promotion

Suggests the kinds of evidence that support instructional & professional achievement, internal & external service.

Conforms to the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between Cal State University (CSU) and California Faculty Association (CFA)

Is governed by the Academic Senate and approved by the President

the ptr document is available
The PTR document is available
  • Online at the Senate Office

http://www.csueastbay.edu/senate/documents/PTR%20doc%20as%20amended%20by%2005-06%20FAC%204.pdf

PTR for Librarians is governed by a separate document

4 explain
4. EXPLAIN
  • Know your audience; anticipate what they must do
  • Be aware that they include your Department Committee, your Chair, your Dean, the Provost, the President (& might include the College & University committees)
  • Explain the evidence you include to this audience
  • WRITE THEIR LETTERS FOR THEM
write a cover letter introductory statement or narrative
Write a cover letter, introductory statement, or narrative
  • Consider using department letterhead
  • State what you’re applying for
  • Follow the format your readers will use
    • Mention your degree
    • Describe your instructional goals& achievement
    • Describe your professional goals & achievements
    • Describe your contributions, interests, & goals for internal and external contributions

WRITE THE LETTER FOR THEM

use what you have
Use What You Have

Update last year’s cover letter

  • Highlight & summarize key evidence in each category
  • Include or describe your probationary faculty plan
  • Revisit your teaching philosophy
  • Mention your publications
  • Don’t draw conclusion; point to the evidence so that the readers can draw the conclusion
index c v degree
INDEX, C.V., & DEGREE
  • Index should identify everything you include in the dossier (for your protection)
  • Submit a copy to your PAF
  • Use Index as a Table of Contents
  • Include an up-to-date c.v.
  • Include a copy of your terminal degree or transcript showing completion of the degree
instructional achievement
Instructional achievement
  • If you have one, begin with a summary or teaching philosophy that highlights what you’d like the reviewers to notice
  • Include a range of evidence but be selective
  • Include evidence of student learning
  • Recognize that instructional achievement is the first category
tips for teaching narrative or philosophy
Tips for teaching narrative or philosophy
  • Describe your approach & style of teaching
  • Explain how your course goals support the goals and objectives of relevant curriculum
  • Describe your development as an instructor
  • Tie your philosophy to Department, College, or University mission, & our unique student population
  • Address any concerns about your teaching from previous reviews
  • Write with your reader in mind
evidence of teaching might include
Evidence of teaching might include
  • Range of undergraduate courses
  • Range of graduate courses
  • Range of formats—Large lecture, Mid-size lecture/discussion, seminar, online or partially online courses
  • Revision of frequently taught courses
  • Incorporation of assessment and general education objectives
evidence of student learning might include
Evidence of student learning might include
  • Designs for group work and group projects
  • Organized role playing, debates, & performances
  • Students’ projects and papers
  • Guidelines for assignments
  • Use of Blackboard discussion groups
evidence of advising teaching beyond the classroom might include
Evidence of advising & teaching beyond the classroom might include
  • Logs of student visits to office hours
  • Independent studies, theses
  • Supervisions of students’ presentations or performances at conferences, festivals, galleries, meets, etc.
  • Sample letters of recommendations
  • Work with student groups & students’ campus functions
  • Involvement in mentoring programs
evidence of classroom collaboration
EVIDENCE OF CLASSROOM COLLABORATION
  • ACTIVITIES THAT CREATE RAPPORT AMONG STUDENTS
  • DESIGNS FOR GROUP WORK AND PROJECTS
  • ORGANIZED ROLE PLAYING, DEBATES, & PERFORMANCES
  • STUDENT GENERATED ACTIVITIES & PROJECTS
  • GUIDELINES FOR PEER EVALUATIONS
  • STUDY GROUPS AMONG STUDENTS
  • USE OF BLACKBOARD DISCUSSION GROUPS
focus substance1
FOCUS & SUBSTANCE
  • The above mentioned materials can be described in your cover letter or instructional summary rather than included
  • Avoid padding the dossier
  • Describe how you integrate your teaching with your professional achievement and service whenever possible
peer evaluations
PEER EVALUATIONS
  • SUMMATIVE EVALUATIONS FROM COLLEAGUES WHO VISIT YOUR CLASS
  • FORMATIVE EVALUATION FROM FACULTY DEVELOPMENT
  • LETTERS FROM COLLEAGUES IN WHOSE CLASSES YOU HAVE PRESENTED
  • LETTERS FROM COLLEAGUES WITH WHOM YOU HAVE SHARED SYLLABI, ASSIGNMENTS, OR COLLABORATED IN OTHER WAYS
student evaluations
STUDENT EVALUATIONS

Impartially administered student course evaluations with tabulated results from Office of Assessment & Testing

unedited summaries of student comments

Unsolicited letters from students

Unsolicited emails with substantive comments from students

Informal feedback on student learning

informal class evaluation
Informal class evaluation
  • Informal, anonymous questionnaires about teaching & learning in the course
  • Snapshot assessment of daily learning; for example, the muddy point activity
  • Final student self-evaluations about learning
professional achievement
Professional Achievement
  • Begin with a summary of your accomplishments that highlights what you’d like the reviewers to notice
  • Explain how you are meeting your research, scholarly, and creative goals
  • Tie your professional to your instructional achievement
  • Write to help your supporters make the best case for you
  • Refer to PTR section 4.1.3
documenting professional achievement
Documenting Professional Achievement
  • Scholarly books or papers published in professional journals
  • Creative and professionally reviewed performances or creative exhibits
  • Publications that are considered credible within the intellectual community
  • Unpublished scholarship or work in progress
  • Conference presentations
evidence might include
Evidence might include

Articles submitted to a scholarly journal.

Published textbooks and other published instructional materials.

Scholarly activities funded by grants.

Submitted grant proposals.

Research reports or scholarly papers presented at conferences, colloquia, and other professional forums.

additional evidence includes
Additional Evidence includes

Participation in professional meetings as a discussant, committee member, or organizer of colloquia/seminars.

Service as a reviewer, an editor, a speaker, an officer of a professional organization, or a consultant.

Publication of expository material in a newspaper, journal, or on a refereed web site.

Scholarly awards and honors.

consider a research agenda
Consider a Research Agenda
  • Apply for internal and external grants
  • Revisit your dissertation
  • Collaborate with colleagues
  • Join a writing circle
  • Visit research and sponsored programs
  • Get a clear idea of expectations
internal university contributions
Internal University Contributions
  • Begin with a summary of your departmental, college, and university service
  • Tie service to pedagogical & professional interests
  • Include evidence when appropriate of your particular contributions to committees
external representation
External Representation
  • Summarize your community service
  • Show its relevance to your discipline
  • Connect your community service to our students
sue schaeffer s tips for university service
Sue Schaeffer’s Tips for University Service
  • One Day Wonders
    • Al Fresco
    • Commencement
    • Orientation
    • Honors Convocation
    • Graduate Recruiting
more from sue
More from Sue
  • Use your skills

Second language fluency-let colleagues know

      • Guest lecture, student clubs, international students, study abroad, translation, greeting visitors to campus

Music, Art, Technology

      • Design logos, or flyers, create web sites
sue schaeffer s creative tips for external service
Sue Schaeffer’s Creative Tips for External Service
  • Have your church/temple host a CSUH student group
  • Bring the soccer team you coach to campus
  • Arrange a campus tour for the school your children attend or that’s in your neighborhood
  • Invite your reading group to a campus event
5 use problems positively
5. USE PROBLEMS POSITIVELY
  • Address concerns raised in retention letters
  • Demonstrate efforts to improve—workshops, observations in teaching; publications and presentations in professional
  • Describe how you have solved any problems; show your new pedagogy
  • Stay positive in tone
6 ask for advice
6. ASK FOR ADVICE
  • Ask your chair and dean for advice
  • Consult with your mentors both in and outside the department
  • Talk to colleagues who have successfully navigated the process
  • Ask trusted colleagues/friend to read your materials
  • We are happy to review your letters and materials in one-on-one consultations through Faculty Development
  • If there is a difference of opinion, defer to those who are part of the decision making process
7 don t draw conclusions
7. DON’T DRAW CONCLUSIONS
  • Never say, ‘I deserve tenure because . . . ‘
  • Let your reviewers draw their own conclusion
  • But make that positive conclusion as easy for them to draw as possible
focus and substance
Focus and Substance
  • Weed out redundant materials
  • Stay lean & mean
  • More than

Is often a

enjoy the process
Enjoy the process
  • Take pleasure in all your accomplishments
  • See the process as an opportunity for professional reflection
  • Set some post-tenure professional goals
  • Share the experience with colleagues
  • Come to the faculty development pizza party
  • Don’t sweat the small stuff!
celebrate your accomplishments with your colleagues
Celebrate your accomplishmentswith your colleagues!
  • Come to the Faculty Development Pizza Party, Tues. & Wed.
  • January 9th & 10th
  • from 11:30-1:30
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