The global house church movement a missions fest vancouver 2008 seminar
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The Global House Church Movement: A Missions Fest Vancouver 2008 Seminar. with Dr. Randy Wollf Serving with The Journey house church network and as a church planting missionary with the Evangelical Free Church. Seminar Outline. House church case studies

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The Global House Church Movement: A Missions Fest Vancouver 2008 Seminar

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The Global House Church Movement:A Missions Fest Vancouver 2008 Seminar

with Dr. Randy Wollf

Serving with The Journey house church network and as a church planting missionary with the Evangelical Free Church


Seminar Outline

  • House church case studies

  • Characteristics of church planting movements

  • Getting started


Seminar Outline

  • House church case studies


Worldwide

  • It is estimated that worldwide there are approximately:

    • 450 million Christians within conventional churches

    • 10 million in cell-based churches

    • 450 million in simple, organic structures such as house churches, or meeting outdoors

      Source – Dale (2005)


Case study - China

  • China went from having approximately five million believers (1949) to 80-130 million today

  • Tens of millions of believers are part of house churches

  • Even if freedom came, the Chinese house leaders have said that they would continue to use the house church approach

  • House church leaders hope to send out 100,000 missionaries into unreached Muslim, Hindhu, and Buddhist regions (initiative called Back to Jerusalem)

    Sources – Brother Yun et al (2003), Zdero (2004)


Case study - India

  • Victor Choudrie, a leading spokesperson for the house church movement in India, estimates that 100,000 house churches started in India from 2001-2006.

    “These little house churches in India are like the starfish, the more you divide them the more they replicate.” (Choudhrie, 2007, p. 308)

  • An Indian housewife started 50 churches in just 12 months (Dale, 2005)

  • A Ph.D. graduate and his 13 year-old son started a church with a street vendor (Dale, 2005)


Case study - Nepal

  • Children as young as 9 or 10 are starting churches (Dale, 2005).


Case study - Philippines

  • Eman Abrea and partners saw the planting of almost 50 house churches in just one year (Abrea, 2007).

  • Romulos Nacua and a few others began 13 house churches in 2000. There are now 400 house churches in the Visayas House Church Network (Nacua, 2007).


Case study - Myanmar

  • Ram Lian started the Household Church Mission (HCM) in 2005.

  • In 2007, 10 students were planting 18 house churches.

  • HCM’s vision is to see 1,000 house churches planted by the year 2030.

  • The HCM mission is to train leaders to start a church from their homes and multiply as God leads them to serve the world for Christ.

    Source – Lian (2007)


Case study - Ethiopia

  • In 1982, the Ethiopian government outlawed the Meserete Kristos Church. It was comprised of 14 congregations with 5,000 members.

  • The church went underground and started meeting in small groups.

  • In 1992, when the Meserete Kristos Church could surface again, its numbers had grown to 50,000.

    Source – Case Study (Ethiopia) in Nexus (2007).

    Note: You can hear more about the story of the Meserete Church in the film “Against Great Odds” distributed by www.visionvideo.com.


Case study - Russia

  • Harold Zimmerman and Home Fellowship Leaders International (www.homefellowshipleaders.com) supply literature to a growing number of Russian house churches (800 currently)

    Source – Zimmerman (2007)


Case study - Britain

  • A house church movement emerged in Britain in the 1960’s and 70’s.

  • Many of these house churches became “New Churches” as they moved into larger facilities.

  • Noble (2007) believes that the house church movement in Britain, although it has waned in recent years, did much to restore vitality to the church in Britain.


Case study – United States

  • It is estimated that there are 5 million people in the U.S. who are involved in house churches (Dale and Dale, 2007).

  • Neil Cole started his first organic church in a coffee shop. This was the start of Church Multiplication Associates (CMA – www.cmaresources)

    • In 2000, CMA started 10 new churches.

    • Second year, 52 church starts.

    • In 2002, CMA saw 106 churches started.

    • In 2007, they had seen well over 1,000 churches started in 36 states and 31 nations.

      Sources – Cole (2007) and Cole (2005)


Churchgoers Putting Feet to Their Longings in the U.S.

Source - Barna (2005)


Churchgoers Putting Feet to Their Longings in the U.S.

Source - Barna (2005)


Case study – Canada

  • The Canadian House Church Network serves as a resource for house churches (www.outreach.ca/OC2-Planting/7-HouseChurches/HC-home.htm).

  • Ross Rains started Pathfinders Fellowships, which now has 11 house churches across Canada (www.pathfindersfellowships.com).

  • The Journey (www.journeypath.com) seeks to help individuals, groups, and churches start simple churches.


Case study – Cuba

  • In the 1990’s fuel shortages and government restrictions on the registration of churches led many Cubans into house churches.

  • Today, it is estimated that there are approximately 10,000 house churches in Cuba.

    Source – Belz (2007)


Case study – Ecuador

  • Guy Muse and other missionaries of the International Mission Board have helped national plant over 250 house churches in Ecuador since 2000 (though only half continue to function).

    Source – Muse (2007)


Case study – Basic Ecclesial Communities

  • House churches are not limited to Protestant Christianity. In 1985, it was estimated that there were over 100,000 Basic Ecclesial Communities associated with the Catholic Church.

    Source – Allen (2007) and Driver (2007)


Case study – Muslim world

  • In an Asian Muslim country, more than 150,000 Muslims embrace Jesus and gather in more than 3,000 locally led Isa Jamaats or Jesus Groups (Garrison, 2004).


Seminar Outline

  • House church case studies

  • Characteristics of church planting movements


Characteristics of Church Planting Movements

Show “Like a mighty wave: Church planting movements” video at http://www.blip.tv/file/149518 or search for it at www.imb.org in their videos section.


Characteristics of Church Planting Movements

  • Extraordinary prayer

  • Abundant gospel sowing

  • Intentional church planting

  • Scriptural authority

  • Local leadership

  • Lay leadership

  • Cell or house churches

  • Churches planting churches

  • Rapid reproduction

  • Healthy churches

How do these characteristics and associated practices contribute to church planting movements?


Seminar Outline

  • House church case studies

  • Characteristics of church planting movements

  • Getting started


Getting Started

Where are you at right now?

  • A rhetorical embrace

  • A simmering vision

  • Faith seeking understanding

  • Passionate pursuit

  • Riding the wave


Getting Started

  • Make room

  • Strengthen your prayer life

  • Begin at the end

  • Think strategically

  • Identify non-Christians in your life

  • Look for and reach out to people of peace (Luke 10)


Getting Started

  • Engage in spiritually meaningful discussions with people of peace

  • Disciple the seekers

  • Baptize those who repent and receive Jesus as Lord

  • Equip them to grow, to serve fellow believers, and to reach the lost

  • Send them out to repeat the whole process


Conclusion

Many Chinese Christians believe that:

“It is good for a Christian to lead someone to Christ.

It is better to plant a church.

It is best to start a church-planting movement.”


Possible Next Steps

  • Prayerfully work through the relevant parts of the “Getting Started” worksheet

  • Attend a “Getting Started” training event (9:00-3:00 on April 5 in Langley)

    Note: You can sign up on the signup list on the resource table (max. 15 people) or contact me.


References

  • Abrea, E. (2007). Case study (Philippines): From traditional pastor to house church planter. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 310-314). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Allen, D. (2007). Case study (Brazil): A house church movement becomes visible. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 365-369). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Barna, G. (2005). Revolution: Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

  • Belz, . (2007). Case study (Cuba): How Fidel Castro launched 10,000 house churches. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 362-364). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Choudhrie, V . (2007). Case study (India): How 100,000 house churches were started in five years. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 304-309). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.


References

  • Cole, N. (2007). Case study (USA): The story of Church Multiplication Associates – From California to Chiang Mai in seven years. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 346-351). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Cole, N. (2005). Organic church: Growing faith where life happens. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

  • Dale, F. (2005). Getting started: A practical guide to planting simple churches. Manchaca, TX: Karis Publishing (available through www.house2house.com).

  • Dale, F. & Dale, T. (2007). Case study (USA): A city of house church networks. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 352-356). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Driver, J. (2007). Case study (Latin America): House churches in a Roman Catholic context. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 376-381). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.


References

  • Garrison, D. (2004). Church planting movements: How God is redeeming a lost world. Midlothian, VA: WIGTake Resources.

    Note: For a free booklet that has the main parts of what the book has, go to http://www.imb.org/CPM/default.htm.

  • Lian, R. K. (2007). Case study (Myanmar): Planting house churches in a Buddhist country. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 323-328). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Muse, G. (2007). Case study (Ecuador): The story and strategy of “The church in your house.” In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 370-375). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Nacua, R. (2007). Case study (Philippines): The wanderer: Unplanned house church planting. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 315-319). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.


References

  • Noble, J. (2007). Case study (Britain): A retrospective on the British house church movement of the 1970’s. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 341-345). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Vision Video & Eastern Mennonite Missions. (2007). Case study (Ethiopia): How an underground church survived persecution. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 304-309). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Yun, B., Yongze, P. X., Wang, E., & Hattaway, P. Back to Jerusalem: Three Chinese house church leaders share their vision to complete the great commission. Atlanta, GA: Authentic. Website - www.backtojerusalem.com

  • Zdero, R. (2004). The global house church movement. Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

  • Zimmerman, H. (2007). Case study (Russia): The house church movement of Mother Russia. In R. Zdero (Ed.), Nexus: The world house church movement reader (pp. 338-340). Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.


Other Resources

  • Books

    • Banks, R. & Banks, J. (1998). The church comes home. Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers.

    • Choudhrie, V. (2006). Greet the ekklesia! The church in your house. Victor Choudhrie.

    • Dale, F. & Dale, T. (2002). Simply church. Manchaca, TX: Karis Publishing (available through www.house2house.com).

    • Fitts, R. (2001). The church in the house: A return to simplicity. Salem, OR: Preparing the Way Publishers.

    • Hattaway, P. The heavenly man: The remarkable true story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun. Grand Rapids, MI: Monarch Books.

    • Simson, W. (1999). Houses that change the world: The return of the house churches. Emmelsbull, Germany: C&P Publishing.

    • Webber, R. E. (2002). The younger evangelicals: Facing the challenges of the new world. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.

    • Zdero, R. (Ed.) (2007). Nexus: The world house church movement reader. Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.


Other Resources

  • Video

    • Like a mighty wave: Church planting movements (available from www.imb.org – click on videos and then search for video title)

    • Tidal wave: An exploration of simple church (available from www.house2house.com)

    • When you come together: Simple church gatherings – what do we do? (available from www.house2house.com)

  • Websites

    • www.house2house.com

    • www.journeypath.com

    • www.dcfi.org

    • www.cmaresources.org

    • www.housechurch.ca

    • www.pathfindersfellowships.com


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