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English 10 Do Now:5-5-14. First: read everything on this slide Take out any notes you have from Act I. You may have your study guide questions out. You may not have your textbook out. Turn in your Do Nows. Name, date, period on every sheet, stapled to the US MAIL BOX.

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English 10 do now 5 5 14
English 10 Do Now:5-5-14

First: read everything on this slide

Take out any notes you have from Act I. You may have your study guide questions out. You may not have your textbook out.

Turn in your Do Nows. Name, date, period on every sheet, stapled to the US MAIL BOX.

We will take a paper version of the test, followed by the clicker version. I’ll explain when all desks are in quiz taking mode.


English 10 today
English 10 Today

  • Write your name on the quiz. Circle the correct answer for each question. When done, raise hand and I will bring you a clicker.

  • Turn clicker on.

  • Join room 200/ Wysocki

  • Enter student ID number when prompted.

  • It should have your name on the screen.

  • Enter in the letter for each answer.

  • When all clickers are done, yours will show which questions you got wrong/right. Do now turn them off until I tell you.


Eng 10 DO NOW 5/6/14

1. What is Cassius’ motive to kill Caesar? What would motive Brutus to kill Caesar?

ELITE:

2. In what way does

Caesar show his powers

of perception?

3. In what way is he

‘blind’ to the danger

Cassius poses?


Brutus language
Brutus’ language

  • L.O.

    • To look closely at Brutus’ use of figurative language


Success today means 5 6 14
Success Today Means 5/6/14

  • Students close read pages 1220-1224, noting their discovers about Brutus’ struggle in the garden and his concept of “an oath”

  • HW: Finish reading through page 1224, answer any related study guide questions.


English 10 do now 5 7 14
English 10 DO NOW 5/7/14

  • Put as many of the following quotes in your own words as possible in 7 minutes.

  • He would be crown'd:  How that might change his nature, there's the question

  • It is the bright day that brings forth the adder; And that craves wary walking.

  • Crown him that, And then, I grant, we put a sting in him, That at his will he may do danger with.

  • And therefore think him as a serpent's egg Which, hatch'd, would, as his kind, grow mischievous, And kill him in the shell.


The Adder and The Ladder

  • Does a ‘climber-upper’ (remember the corporate ladder ex.) seem threatening by himself?

  • What happens when you link him with a poisonous serpent?

  • What is interesting about the fact that Brutus is walking in his orchard and thinking about breaking an oath? (Consider the biblical reference).

  • How might a person go about recognising the potential for tyranny (a serpent’s egg) and eliminate it before it becomes dangerous?

  • What are the risks of such an approach?


Chicken or the egg
Chicken or the egg?

How does this relate to Brutus’ dilemma?


Today s goals
Today’s Goals

  • Learning objective:

    • To examine the power dynamic of the conspirators.

    • To examine the role of the women in the play and how they add to the dramatic impact.

      Success means you record your observations using the study guide to keep you focused on the objective.


English 10 do now 5 8 14
English 10 DO NOW 5/8/14

  • What are some modern day superstitions? What do people today think is bad luck, what brings good luck?

  • ELITE: what physical action did Portia at the end of yesterday’s reading to prove she was “stronger than her sex”?




Today s learning objective
Today’s Learning Objective

  • To examine the role of the women in the play and how they add to the dramatic impact.

  • To examine the effect of superstition on Caesar

    Success means you record your observations using the study guide to keep you focused on the objective.


Eng 10 DO NOW 5/9/14

  • What is Caesar’s initial reaction to Calphurnia’s plead not to attend the senate that day?

  • How does Calphurnia convince Caesar to do as she wishes?

  • What does Decius say which convinces Caesar that he must go to the senate that day in spite of Calphurnia’s warning? What does this reveal about Caesar?

    ELITE: How is superstition linked to the social and historical context of the play? Consider the spiritual beliefs of Romans at this time.


Today s learning objective1
Today’s Learning Objective

To explore how suspense is being built in the play through the female characters, the soothsayer.

Success means you record your observations using the study guide to keep you focused on the objective.


The murder scene
The Murder Scene

  • L.O.

    • To be able to look at Caesar’s role before he dies

    • To explore Caesar’s role in the play


Caesar s character
Caesar’s Character

  • Look at the following vocabulary and make sure you are able to define each word

  • Are these characteristics a true reflection of Caesar’s character?

  • Do you disagree with any and can you find the evidence?


Key Vocabulary

Stubborn

Constant

Pragmatic

Changeable

Steadfast

‘…I am constant as the northern star…’ Julius Caesar


Light imagery caesar s speech page 113
LIGHT IMAGERY – CAESAR’S SPEECH PAGE 113

  • Why is it important that light imagery is used by Caesar at this point in the play?

  • What does it reveal about his character?


Look at the following pictures
LOOK AT THE FOLLOWING PICTURES:

  • Explore the pictures and think about how they have imagined the death of Caesar

  • Do you notice any patterns?


Video
Video:

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FvgP5hO99o

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je0gTnheVe4&feature=related

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9H-Kztt6WpM


Plenary
PLENARY:

  • What role has Julius Caesar played in the play so far?

  • What surprises you about his early death considering the play is called ‘Julius Caesar’?


Antony s reaction
Antony’s Reaction

  • L.O.

    • To be able to examine Antony’s role in the play and his immediate reaction

    • To take part in a drama task to explore Caesar’s assassination



Antony s speech
Antony’s speech

  • Work in small groups to read out Antony’s speech to show his anger at what has happened

  • What words would you focus on?


‘And dreadful objects so familiar, That mothers shall but smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

Antony’s

Reaction!

‘Domestic fury, and fierce civil strife shall cumber all the parts of Italy…’

‘…And Caesar’s spirit ranging for revenge, With Ate by his side come hot from hell…’

‘I am meek and gentle with these butchers…’


Peeze
PEEZE smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

Select one quotation and write a PEEZE paragraph to explore how Antony may feel at the death of his friend


Act Three, Scene One, Review smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

  • Why is it important for the conspirators to get Antony out of the way?

  • What do Caesar’s last words tell us about his feelings for Brutus?

  • How is the action of lines 105-107 connected with Calphurnia?

  • Through which character does Shakespeare warn the audience that Antony could mean trouble for the conspirators?

  • What does Antony really think of the conspirators?

  • Do you think Octavius’ arrival signals good news or bad news of the conspirators? Why?


Elizabethan Audience’s Reaction to Antony’s soliloquy? smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

Modern Audience’s Response to Antony’s soliloquy?


Figurative Language in smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

Brutus’s Speech


Figurative Language in smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

Antony’s Speech


Get Thinking . . . smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

Summarise last lesson in 18 words

OR

Unscramble the following anagrams they are key words for today’ s lesson and will help you think about our learning objectives:

niimabto

launhoorbe

shapto


Venn Diagram: Brutus and Antony’s Speeches smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’


Close Textual Analysis smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

How does Mark Antony feel about Caesar’s assassination?

What words does he use to express his feelings?

How do you think he would have delivered his speech? Consider his tone of voice, mood and attitude.

Note the order of the speech – do you think he might at any point: whisper, cry or yell?

What impact does the speech have on the crowd?


Dramatic Definitions smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

A still image is a freeze-frame of a particularly dramatic moment in a performance. Using levels, posture, facial expressions and body language the actors can communicate a great deal to the audience about what has taken place without having to move or speak. See the example in this short clip.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/drama/activities/still_image/still_image.shtml


Cross cutting
Cross-cutting smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

  • is an dramatic technique most often used to establish action occurring at the same time in two different locations. In a cross-cut, the audience’s focus will move away from one action to another action, which can suggest the simultaneity of these two actions. Suspense may be added by cross-cutting. It is built through the expectations that it creates and in the hopes that it will be explained with time. Cross-cutting also forms parallels; it illustrates a narrative action that happens in several places at approximately the same time.


Act Four, Scene Three smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

  • Read lines 9-12. What is Brutus accusing Cassius of?

  • Read lines 18-28. What does this speech reveal to you about Brutus’s character and his motive for killing Caesar? (PEE)

  • Read lines 42-49. Put yourself in Cassius’s shoes. How might Brutus’s words here make you even more angry? (Think of a time when you were really angry and someone laughed at you for it. How did it make you feel?)

  • Read lines 65-83. Which famous fictional character can you compare Brutus to based upon this speech? Give reasons for your choice.

  • Read lines 100-107. Compare the ways in which an Elizabethan and a modern audience might react to this speech.


Brutus’ Problems smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

  • Cassius’ past behaviour

  • Cassius’ present attitude

  • Portia’s death

  • Cassius’ accusations

  • the poet’s interruption

  • news of the death of 100 senators

  • news of the approaching armies

  • Caesar’s ghost


Defining Foreboding smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

  • a feeling of evil to come

  • an unfavourable omen

  • fateful: ominously prophetic


Balloon Debate smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

A balloon debate is a debate in which a number of speakers attempt to win the approval of an audience.

The audience is invited to imagine that the speakers are flying in a hot-air balloon which is sinking and that someone must be thrown out if everyone is not to die.

Each speaker has to make the case why they should not be thrown out of the balloon to save the remainder.

Who should go overboard:

  • Antony?

  • Cassius?

  • Brutus?


Tension Graph smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’

Using the ‘plot at a glance’ reference on page 228, complete a tension graph for the plot of ‘Julius Caesar’.


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