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INTRODUCTION. Jerry Mechling Harvard University October 25, 2010. Agenda. LNW goals and process Status now: Tough times priorities The problem: tough times ++ Major moves Preliminary assessments Next steps. 480 Goals and Process. Learning Goals: Value via IT-enabled innovation

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Introduction

INTRODUCTION

Jerry Mechling

Harvard UniversityOctober 25, 2010


Agenda

Agenda

LNW goals and process

Status now: Tough times priorities

The problem: tough times ++

Major moves

Preliminary assessments

Next steps


Introduction

480 Goals and Process

  • Learning Goals:

  • Value via IT-enabled innovation

  • Briefing papers for practitioners

  • Career options/networking

  • Process: reading, writing, dialog, decisions…

  • Start with the Tough Times analysis

  • Extend to key stakeholders/groups

  • Add info from class, online, and others

  • Analyze further within DC workshop

  • Revise by January 21, 2011


Agenda1

Agenda

LNW goals and process

Status now: Tough times priorities

The problem: tough times ++

Major moves

Preliminary assessments

Next steps


Introduction

Responses to tough times…

  • Defense…

    China Prepares to Hunker Down for Three Years to Weather the Global Economic CrisisChinaMatters

  • But not only defense?…

“You never want a serious crisis to go to waste. What I mean by that is it's an opportunity to do things that you think you could not do before. This is an opportunity.”

Rahm Emanuel, Obama Chief of Staff

Will today’s tough times lead to major moves?


Yes if and where pressure meets possibility

Yes, if and where pressure meets possibility…

Pressure --

Economics – worst pain since the Great Depression

Citizen demands – to DO something (but worried it will be wrong)

Demographics – as boomers retire, demand up and supply down

Possibility --

Technology – Web 2.0 ++ new: data, processing, and communications (peer-to-peer)

Organization – from hierarchical routine to networked innovation

Politics – new administrations, mandates for change

So, beyond hunkering down, WHAT SHOULD WE DO?...


An exercise in applied collaborative research

An exercise in applied, collaborative research…

Randy Johnson, Hennepin County, MN

Gopal Kapur, Center for Project Mgt

Gopal Khanna, Minnesota

Larry Koskinen, U.S. Dept. of Treasury

Timothy Loewenstein, Buffalo County, NE

Anne Margulies, Massachusetts

Jerry Mechling, Harvard University

Jane Smith Patterson, e-NC, North Carolina Lisa Schlosser, U.S. EPA

Marlin Schneider, State of Wisconsin

Teri Takai, State of California

PK Agarwal, State of California

Reg Alcock, University of Manitoba

Michael Armstrong, Corpus Christi

Phil Bertolini, Oakland County, Michigan

George Burgess, Miami Dade County

Aneesh Chopra, U.S. CTO

Sharon Dawes, SUNY Albany

Karen Evans, former U.S. OMB

Stephen Fletcher, Utah

Maryantonett Flumian, Univ. of Ottawa

Steven W. Jennings, Harris County, Texas


Agenda2

Agenda

LNW goals and overview

Status now: Tough times priorities

The problem: tough times ++

Major moves

Preliminary assessments

Next steps


Moves process governance value

MOVES: Process + Governance  Value

hierarchy

GOVERNANCE:

feedback + authority

VALUE:

productivity

equity

legitimacy/transparency

lower risk/uncertainty

PROCESS:

specialization and scale

rules rules rules rules rules rules

Given better information, what changes?


Often not much leadership problems

Often, not much. Leadership problems…

  • Head in the sand

    • IT “not strategic”

    • “Don’t bother me”

  • Silver bullet

    • IT as “the solution”

    • “Don’t bother me”

  • Boiled frog

    • Gov’t ignores, if not a crisis

    • Can’t respond in time

What progress so far? What’s next?


Assessing value and feasibility

Assessing value and feasibility…

Eight Major Moves .

Val.

Feas.

1. Delivery: online/civic engagement

2. Production:integrated/shared services

process

3. Value Chain: industry reconfiguration

4. Infrastructure extension

5. Feedback/transparency

6. Massive collaboration

governance

7. New and open standards

8. New patterns of authority

Will new moves ‘out there’ work ‘here’?


1 delivery online civic engagement

broadband (video/emotions) and wireless (anywhere)

two-way interaction (lower the engagement barriers)

Examples:Obama campaign + administration

1. Delivery: Online/Civic Engagement

PROCESS MOVES –

“online, not in line”


2 production integrated shared services

Process redesign for scale economies and responsiveness (Eligibility, IT, HR, Finance, Procurement, etc.)

Examples: Michigan (over many years); Nova Scotia (province-wide ERP)

2. Production: Integrated/Shared Services

PROCESS MOVES –

BPR


3 value chain industry reconfiguration

reform entire industries: trade, health care, education, counter-terrorism, integrated transportation, development, etc.

3. Value Chain: Industry Reconfiguration

Example: Health Care – needs EMRs and better incentives

PROCESS MOVES –

XBT


4 infrastructure extension

broadband, wireless, and data investments

Examples: Stimulus bill broadband, Netherlands data standards for financial regulation

4. Infrastructure Extension

PROCESS MOVES –

inter-operability


5 feedback transparency

5. Feedback/Transparency

Make gov’t data accessible to all (for transparency and accountability)

Examples: D.C. “democratizing data” initiative; federal initiatives with data.gov and itusaspending.gov

GOVERNANCE MOVES –


6 massive collaboration

6. Massive Collaboration

Use Web 2.0 tools to engage more stakeholders in planning and implementation

Examples: Intellipedia, Diplopedia, Peer-to-Patent, etc.

GOVERNANCE MOVES –


7 new and open standards

7. New and Open Standards

Promote collaboration via open standards (avoid the dependency and delays of case-by-case decisions)

Examples: cloud computing; Canada identity standards

GOVERNANCE MOVES –


8 new patterns of authority

8. New Patterns of Authority

Establish authority as needed for ongoing coordination of new patterns of interaction

Examples: budgeting authority for long-term cross-boundary innovation

GOVERNANCE MOVES –


Agenda3

Agenda

LNW goals and overview

Status now: Tough times priorities

The problem: tough times ++

Major moves

Preliminary assessments

Next steps


Analysis what s valuable and feasible

Analysis: What’s valuable and feasible?...

2

5

1

4

4

8

3

7

6

7

6

4

Eight Major Moves .

Val.

Feas.

1. Delivery: online/civic engagement

2

2. Production:integration/shared services

3

process

1

3. Value Chain: Industry reconfiguration

8

4. Infrastructure extension

5. Feedback/transparency

6. Massive collaboration

governance

7. New and open standards

8. New patterns of authority

“Take what the defense gives” + “the bomb” + “both”…


Major themes

Major Themes

  • 21st century service model. Bundle infrastructure, shared services, and delivery (for productivity, equity – hi value and feasibility):

    • Especially support services, health care, education, police, transport, economic development

    • Small locals to consume services while keeping customer relationships; states and private sector to develop and host (via cloud); feds to provide venture capital for development/evaluation/standards

  • 21st century open government model. Bundle data and collaboration (for transparency, competitive efficiency – potentially high but uncertain value and feasibility)

  • 21st century “business” model. Use self-service, volunteers, capital funds, user fees, and a redesigned tax base.


Agenda4

Agenda

LNW goals and overview

Status now: Tough times priorities

The problem: tough times ++

Major moves

Preliminary assessments

Next steps


How to learn from early movers

The GAP –a HUGE problem

Extension by “fast followers”

Invention by “first movers”

How to learn from early movers?…

Economies of standardization

Economies of innovation

Adoption

Time

Build bridges via deeper, trusted communications

  • More effective CXO + CIO relationships

  • Easier/deeper access to exemplary tools for action: scorecards, budgets, project proposals, RFPs, contracts, job descriptions, press releases, evaluations, articles, etc.

  • Virtual communities of practice


Parting thoughts

Parting Thoughts…

  • IT-enabled innovation – it’s what the Information Age is all about. Leadership issues, NOT just technology.

  • The goal is maximizing public value, NOT minimizing technology costs.

  • Change is clearly risky, but failing to adapt is the biggest risk.

  • Web 2.0 and social networking offer new and potentially powerful possibilities.


Introduction1

INTRODUCTION

Jerry Mechling

Harvard UniversityOctober 25, 2010


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