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Employment status of partnered working women in Australia. Examining the impact of male partners’ characteristics. Riyana Miranti , Rebecca Cassells and Justine McNamara Presentation at the 11 th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne 7-9 July 2010. Acknowledgements.

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employment status of partnered working women in australia

Employment status of partnered working women in Australia

Examining the impact of male partners’ characteristics

Riyana Miranti, Rebecca Cassells and Justine McNamara

Presentation at the 11th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne 7-9 July 2010.

acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
  • The authors would like to acknowledge NATSEM for funding this research through a NATSEM research publication grant.
introduction
Introduction
  • Increasing female labour force participation during the past 20 years
  • Increasing female labour participation of married women (Abhayaratna and Lattimore 2006)
  • Theoretical framework suggests that labour supply decision of a married woman is determined in the context of her family labour force participation, particularly the husband or the male partner
  • Discouraged worker effect vs added worker effect
research objectives
Research Objectives
  • To examine whether, among partnered working women, the male partner’s characteristics including labour force status, age and disability status affect the nature of employment of these women
  • To examine how the impact of male partner’s characteristics differs for partnered working women in a variety of working situations (employment status): full time, underemployed and happily part time
data and sample
Data and sample
  • The 2006 Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey
  • Choosing cross sectional rather than longitudinal data
  • Partnered working women aged 15-64 years
  • Some exclusions: (i) same sex partner, (ii) self-employed and (iii) business owner
  • Legally married women and women in de facto relationship
  • Observations where both male and female partners in a household have responded.
  • Final sample 1849 employed partnered women, 24 per cent are in a de facto relationship
explanatory variables
Explanatory variables

Supply and Demand factors

supply factors include
Supply factors include:
  • Personal characteristics
    • Work history
    • Employment attributes
  • Family characteristics
    • Age of youngest child
    • Male partners’ characteristics: labour force status, age and disability status
demand factors include
Demand factors include:
  • Work environment:
    • occupation based on skill level
    • industry
    • sector of employment
  • Place of residence and socio-economic characteristics
    • unemployment rates
    • geographical location
    • SEIFA index of relative socioeconomic advantage/disadvantage
methodology
Methodology
  • Using a multinomial logit regression
  • Estimate the probability of being in one of these employment status categories: full time, underemployed and happily part time
  • Calculating the marginal effects of the impact of the determinants on each of the employment status categories
selected descriptive statistics male partner characteristics
Selected descriptive statistics: Male partner characteristics

Note: based on HILDA wave 6 weighted with person replicate weights

regression results marginal effects of male partner characteristics
Regression results: Marginal effects of male partner characteristics

Note: based on HILDA wave 6

conclusions
Conclusions
  • Complexities of the relationship between the determinants of employment status of partnered working women
  • Having an unemployed male partner increase the likelihood for partnered working women to work full time
  • In either case that male partners’ or female partners’ age is near the retirement age, the likelihood to work underemployed decreases and work happily part time increases – withdrawal from labour market.
  • Other factors for FT participation: higher educational attainment, the older the age of the youngest child/do not have children and higher wages
conclusions1
Conclusions
  • Women who are underemployed - are likely women who work in low skilled occupation and are hired on non permanent contracts
  • Living in areas with lower unemployment rate reduces the likelihood to be underemployed – macroeconomic condition matters
slide16

Thank you

Thank you

[email protected]

www.natsem.canberra.edu.au

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