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Information Literacy Workshop. Presented by Dr. Judith Kizzie & Laura Yoo at Howard Community College on August 22, 2006 NOTE: This is the PowerPoint that supported the overall presentation. Table of Contents. Writing Intensive Program at HCC What is information literacy?

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information literacy workshop

Information Literacy Workshop

Presented by Dr. Judith Kizzie & Laura Yoo

at Howard Community College

on August 22, 2006

NOTE: This is the PowerPoint that supported the overall presentation.

table of contents
Table of Contents
  • Writing Intensive Program at HCC
  • What is information literacy?
  • Information Literacy & Critical Thinking
  • Online Resources
  • Sample assignments
writing intensive program at hcc
Writing Intensive Program at HCC:

Mission

  • HCC Writing Intensive Program fosters students\' abilities to write effectively in their respective disciplines. Towards that end, the program provides essential support, services, and ample resources to help faculty design and implement the writing-across-the-curriculum program.

Goals

  • To improve the effectiveness of students\' writing
  • To teach students the conventions of writing in different disciplines and how to address different audiences
  • To foster the goals of the General Education Program as they relate to academic literacy and critical thinking skills

Objectives

  • To promote effective communication among writing intensive faculty
  • To provide opportunities to discuss and refine the definition of effective writing in a variety of disciplines
  • To encourage current pedagogical practices through reevaluation and with updated resources
writing intensive courses at hcc
ENGL 115 CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 200 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

ENGL 201 AMERICAN LITERATURE I

ENGL 202 AMERICAN LITERATURE II

ENGL 203 ENGLISH LITERATURE I

ENGL 204 ENGLISH LITERATURE II

ENGL 205 THE SHORT STORY

ENGL 206 AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE

ENGL 207 ETHICS IN LITERATURE

ENGL 208 TWENTIETH CENTURY POETRY

ENGL 209 MODERN DRAMA

ENGL 210 INTRODUCTION TO FICTION, POETRY AND DRAMA

ENGL 211 SCIENCE THROUGH SCIENCE FICTION

ENGL 212 BY AND ABOUT WOMEN

ENGL 215 ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 225 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURE

ENGL 250 SHAKESPEARE FROM PAGE TO STAGE

PSYC 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 102 ADVANCED GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 202 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 203 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 204 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

SOCI 101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 102 SOCIAL PROBLEMS

SOCI 105 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

HMDV 200 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT

HIST 121 THE ANCIENT WORLD: PREHISTORY TO THE MIDDLE AGES

HIST 122 WESTERN CIVILIZATION AND THE PRE-MODERN WORLD

HIST 123 WESTERN CIVILIZATION AND THE MODERN WORLD

HIST 111 AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

HIST 112 AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1877

HIST 201 EUROPE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

HIST 211 EAST ASIAN CIVILIZATION-CHINA, JAPAN AND KOREA

HIST 213 HISTORY OF MODERN RUSSIA

HIST 226 HISTORY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

POLI 101 AMERICAN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

POLI 201 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT

ECON 101 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (MACRO)

ECON 102 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (MICRO)

ECON 201 MONEY AND BANKING

ECON 205 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

GEOG 101 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 102 ELEMENTS OF CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 201 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY

http://www.howardcc.edu/writingintensive/proto/

Writing Intensive Courses at HCC
when we ask students
When we ask students…
  • to summarize or paraphrase what was read
  • to pin-point the main idea of what was read
  • to compare/contrast information from two or more sources
  • to read and evaluate a piece of writing or specific information – do you agree or disagree?
  • to write a researched essay
  • to find information on the internet
  • to use library resources
  • to use a library database
  • to determine the usefulness of a source
  • to comment on the validity, the legitimacy, or the relevance of a source
  • to find a “scholarly” source
  • to make connections between readings
  • to cite sources

… we are encouraging information literacy skills

but what is information literacy
But what IS information literacy?

The Association of College & Research Libraries (a division of the American Library Association) defines it as the ability to:

  • Determine the extent of information needed
  • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently
  • Evaluate information and its sources critically
  • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
  • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
  • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally
critical thinking
Critical Thinking
  • Information literacy is critical thinking
  • Information literacyis not just computer literacy – many of our students may be computer-savvy but not information-savvy
  • Knowing what information is needed, knowing how to get it, and how to use it are key to information literacy
  • Showing how we exercise information literacy in real-life situations will help students better understand not only the concepts but also the importance of information literacy skills
  • Many primary and secondary schools recognize information literacy as critical to student success (see Big6 and SOS, for example) and librarians are playing important roles in promoting information literacy
sample assignments
SAMPLE ASSIGNMENTS

The sample assignment prompts that follow are examples of assignments that encourage information literacy skills.

How to read the sample assignments:

  • The left column is the assignment prompt. The right column lists the specific outcomes that are being encouraged in the assignment sheet.
  • The roman numeral indicates the standard, the Arabic numeral indicates the performance indicator under that standard, and the alphabet indicates the specific outcome under that performance indicator.
  • Refer to the standards issued by Association of College and Research Libraries (a division of the American Library Association)

http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/informationliteracycompetency.htm#stan (there is an option to view the PDF version of this information)

assignment example researched essay
Essay 3: Research Essay (for College Composition II)

Choose one of the following topics and write a 6-7 page informative (researched) essay with a thesis statement that clearly states your argument (your position).

A. Bilingual Education: Should we or shouldn’t we?

Using Richard Rodriguez’s essay, the three corresponding essays we read in class, and your own research, you will write an essay that is informative and argumentative. By providing extensive information on this issue, you will argue for or against bilingual education. You may want to incorporate real cases of implementation of bilingual education curriculum and provide some of the opponents’ views as well as the proponents’ views so that your own argument is a part of the ongoing discussion about this issue. [I.1.b; I.1.c]

B. Justice for All: “Doing Time in the Thirteenth Chair” and “I, the Juror”

Using these two essays, you will write a research essay that is informative and argumentative. Find out under what circumstances one would be tried by a jury and the ideas and theories behind the jury system. More importantly, explore the ways in which this system works or doesn’t work. You may incorporate a real (and fairly well known) court case as an example. However, if you cite such a case, be sure to stay within this topic of jury system (don’t digress into the crime or the trial as a whole). The main texts of your essay will be the abovementioned essays by Joyce Carol Oates and Scott Russell Sanders. [III.2.b]

C. Design your own topic

You don’t like the suggested the topics? If there is an issue that derives from one or two of our readings throughout this course that interest you, please discuss your ideas with me as soon as possible. Your topic needs to be clearly defined and relatively specific so that your 6-8 page paper can cover the topic thoroughly. You must get a paper topic approval from me by Friday, November 11. [I.1.a]

Relevant Standards, Performance Indicators, and Outcomes

I.1.b: Develops a thesis statement and formulates questions based on the information need

I.1.c: Explores general information sources to increase familiarity with the topic

III.2.b: Analyzes the structure and logic of supporting arguments or methods

I.1.a: Confers with instructors and participates in class discussions, peer workgroups, and electronic discussions to identify a research topic, or other information need

Assignment Example: Researched Essay
slide10
[sample essay assignment continued]

RESEARCH REQUIREMENTS [I.2.c]

You MUST incorporate at least seven research materials into your essay (works cited). Of these seven, at least one must be a reliable website, one a reliable journal or magazine, and one a reliable book. You must correctly use the MLA documentation style in your essay. We will visit the library for an orientation on how to get the information you need. Start your research as soon as possible so that you have plenty of time to collect, read, sort, and understand the information you gather. [II.5.c; II.5.d; V.3.a]

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

LENGTH: 6-7 pages (about 1500-1800 words)

FONT:12 point Times New Roman

Final Draft Portfolio must include: annotated bibliography (with my comments on it); essay plan (with my initials); peer-reviewed 1st rough draft (with comments); peer reviewed 2nd rough draft (with comments); final draft [II.2.a]

Relevant Standards, Performance Indicators, and Outcomes

I.2.c: Identifies the value and differences of potential resources in a variety of formats (e.g., multimedia, database, website, data set, audio/visual, book)

II.5.c: Differentiates between the types of sources cited and understands the elements and correct syntax of a citation for a wide range of resources

II.5.d: Records all pertinent citation information for future reference

V.3.a: Selects an appropriate documentation style and uses it consistently to cite sources

II.2.a: Develops a research plan appropriate to the investigative method

assignment example annotated bibliography
WHY?

This assignment is designed to help you organize your ideas, your resources, and how you might approach this project, for writing a research paper needs to be very methodical. The annotated bibliography also helps you sort your research materials. (It also helps you begin thinking about your final paper early in the semester so that you do not have to rush to write your final paper in the last few hectic days of the semester.) [I.3.c]

WHAT?

Part 1: The Summary/Proposal

Your summary/proposal should answer some of the following questions: What is (are) your main text(s) (movie/story/essay/play)? What is your working thesis statement? [I.1.b] What are you interested in researching and finding out? What is your method? [I.2.c]

Part 2: The Annotated Bibliography

An annotated bibliography is a list of citations to books, articles, and documents. Each citation is followed by a brief descriptive and evaluative paragraph called the annotation. These annotations inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources you intend to use in your research paper. [III.2.a]

Relevant Standards, Performance Indicators, and Outcomes

I.3.c:Defines a realistic overall plan and timeline to acquire the needed information

I.1.b: Develops a thesis statement and formulates questions based on the information need

I.2.c: Identifies the value and differences of potential resources in a variety of formats (e.g., multimedia, database, website, data set, audio/visual, book)

III.2.a: Examines and compares information from various sources in order to evaluate reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness, and point of view or bias

Assignment Example: Annotated Bibliography
slide12
[sample annotated biliography assignment continued…]

HOW?

Locate [I.2.c & e] and record citations to books, websites, periodicals, and documents that may contain useful information and ideas on your topic.

Review the actual items (and not just the summaries or reviews of the items). At this point, read the introduction, the abstract, or browse carefully to determine if the material will be useful for your topic. [III.1.a]

Choose those items that you want to include in your essay (minimum 7).

Cite your sources using MLA documentation style. (see Bedford Handbook) [V.3.a]

Write a concise annotation that summarizes the central theme and scope of the book or article. [III.2.a] Include 3-5 sentences that:

evaluate the authority or background of the author,

comment on the intended audience, [I.2.d]

compare or contrast this work with another you have cited, and/or

explain how this work illuminates your bibliography topic.

Relevant Standards, Performance Indicators, and Outcomes

I.2.c: Identifies the value and differences of potential resources in a variety of formats (e.g., multimedia, database, website, data set, audio/visual, book)

I.2.e: Differentiates between primary and secondary sources, recognizing how their use and importance vary with each discipline

III.1.a: Reads the text and selects main ideas

V.3.a: Selects an appropriate documentation style and uses it consistently to cite sources

III.2.a: Examines and compares information from various sources in order to evaluate reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness, and point of view or bias

I.2.d:Identifies the purpose and audience of potential resources (e.g., popular vs. scholarly, current vs. historical)

online resources
Online Resources
  • HCC Library’s Information Literacy Training - http://library.howardcc.edu/Faculty/FacultyMain.htm
  • HCC Library’s Paper Topic Ideas -http://library.howardcc.edu/PaperTopics/PaperTopics.htm
  • Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) – a division of American Libraries Association. HCC’s information literacy workgroup has decided to use the standards set forth by the ACRL. http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/informationliteracycompetency.htm
  • Big6 – developed by two educators, it is one of the widely known framework for teaching information and technology skills, especially in elementary and secondary education http://www.big6.com/index.php
  • SOS of Information Literacy - web-based multimedia resources for educatorshttp://www.informationliteracy.org/default.php
  • National Forum on Information Literacy – http://www.infolit.org/
  • DORIL – this is an online directory of electronic resources for librarians and educators. http://bulldogs.tlu.edu/mdibble/doril/
work together
Work together!

One of the best ways to learn more about information literacy and how you can incorporate its specific outcomes into your courses is to contact the college librarians and work with them in designing and implementing assignments. Only through collaborative efforts, can we help our students become information literate citizens.

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