petri nets ee249 fall 2000
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Petri Nets ee249 Fall 2000

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 107

Petri Nets ee249 Fall 2000 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 57 Views
  • Uploaded on

Petri Nets ee249 Fall 2000. Marco Sgroi Most slides borrowed from Luciano Lavagno’s lecture ee249 (1998). Models Of Computation for reactive systems. Main MOCs: Communicating Finite State Machines Dataflow Process Networks Discrete Event Codesign Finite State Machines Petri Nets

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Petri Nets ee249 Fall 2000' - kristine-eris


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
petri nets ee249 fall 2000

Petri Netsee249 Fall 2000

Marco Sgroi

Most slides borrowed from

Luciano Lavagno’s lecture ee249 (1998)

models of computation for reactive systems
Models Of Computationfor reactive systems
  • Main MOCs:
    • Communicating Finite State Machines
    • Dataflow Process Networks
    • Discrete Event
    • Codesign Finite State Machines
    • Petri Nets
  • Main languages:
    • StateCharts
    • Esterel
    • Dataflow networks
outline
Outline
  • Petri nets
    • Introduction
    • Examples
    • Properties
    • Analysis techniques
    • Scheduling
petri nets pns
Petri Nets (PNs)
  • Model introduced by C.A. Petri in 1962
    • Ph.D. Thesis: “Communication with Automata”
  • Applications: distributed computing, manufacturing, control, communication networks, transportation…
  • PNs describe explicitly and graphically:
    • sequencing/causality
    • conflict/non-deterministic choice
    • concurrency
  • Asynchronous model (partial ordering)
  • Main drawback: no hierarchy
petri net graph
Petri Net Graph
  • Bipartite weighted directed graph:
    • Places: circles
    • Transitions: bars or boxes
    • Arcs: arrows labeled with weights
  • Tokens: black dots

p2

t2

2

t1

p1

p4

3

t3

p3

petri net
Petri Net
  • A PN (N,M0) is a Petri Net Graph N
    • places: represent distributed state by holding tokens
      • marking (state) M is an n-vector (m1,m2,m3…), where mi is the non-negative number of tokens in place pi.
      • initial marking (M0) is initial state
    • transitions: represent actions/events
      • enabled transition: enough tokens in predecessors
      • firing transition: modifies marking
  • …and an initial marking M0.

p2

t2

2

t1

p1

p4

3

Places/Transition: conditions/events

t3

p3

transition firing rule
Transition firing rule
  • A marking is changed according to the following rules:
    • A transition is enabled if there are enough tokens in each input place
    • An enabled transition may or may not fire
    • The firing of a transition modifies marking by consuming tokens from the input places and producing tokens in the output places

2

2

2

2

3

3

concurrency causality choice1
Concurrency, causality, choice

t1

Concurrency

t2

t5

t3

t4

t6

concurrency causality choice2
Concurrency, causality, choice

t1

t2

t5

Causality, sequencing

t3

t4

t6

concurrency causality choice3
Concurrency, causality, choice

t1

t2

t5

Choice,

conflict

t3

t4

t6

concurrency causality choice4
Concurrency, causality, choice

t1

t2

t5

Choice,

conflict

t3

t4

t6

confusion
Confusion
  • t1 and t2 are concurrent but their firing order is not irrelevant for conflict resolution (not local choice)
  • From (1,1,0,0,0):
    • solving a conflict (t1,t2) (0,0,0,0,1),(0,0,1,1,0)
    • not solving a conflict (t2,t1) (0,0,1,1,0)

p1

p3

t1

p5

t3

p4

p2

t2

communication protocol
Communication Protocol

Send msg

Receive msg

P2

P1

Send Ack

Receive Ack

communication protocol1
Communication Protocol

Send msg

Receive msg

P2

P1

Send Ack

Receive Ack

communication protocol2
Communication Protocol

Send msg

Receive msg

P2

P1

Send Ack

Receive Ack

communication protocol3
Communication Protocol

Send msg

Receive msg

P2

P1

Send Ack

Receive Ack

communication protocol4
Communication Protocol

Send msg

Receive msg

P2

P1

Send Ack

Receive Ack

communication protocol5
Communication Protocol

Send msg

Receive msg

P2

P1

Send Ack

Receive Ack

producer consumer problem
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem1
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem2
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem3
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem4
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem5
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem6
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem7
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem8
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem9
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem10
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem11
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem12
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem13
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer problem14
Producer-Consumer Problem

Produce

Buffer

Consume

producer consumer with priority
Producer-Consumer with priority

A

Consumer B can

consume only if

buffer A is empty

Inhibitor arcs

B

pn properties
PN properties
  • Behavioral: depend on the initial marking (most interesting)
    • Reachability
    • Boundedness
    • Schedulability
    • Liveness
    • Conservation
  • Structural: do not depend on the initial marking (often too restrictive)
    • Consistency
    • Structural boundedness
reachability
Reachability
  • Marking M is reachable from marking M0 if there exists a sequence of firingss = M0 t1 M1 t2 M2… M that transforms M0 to M.
  • The reachability problem is decidable.

p2

t2

M0 = (1,0,1,0)

t3

M1 = (1,0,0,1)

t2

M = (1,1,0,0)

p1

t1

p4

t3

p3

M0 = (1,0,1,0)

M = (1,1,0,0)

liveness
Liveness
  • Liveness: from any marking any transition can become fireable
    • Liveness implies deadlock freedom, not viceversa

Not live

liveness1
Liveness
  • Liveness: from any marking any transition can become fireable
    • Liveness implies deadlock freedom, not viceversa

Not live

liveness2
Liveness
  • Liveness: from any marking any transition can become fireable
    • Liveness implies deadlock freedom, not viceversa

Deadlock-free

liveness3
Liveness
  • Liveness: from any marking any transition can become fireable
    • Liveness implies deadlock freedom, not viceversa

Deadlock-free

boundedness
Boundedness
  • Boundedness: the number of tokens in any place cannot grow indefinitely
    • (1-bounded also called safe)
    • Application: places represent buffers and registers (check there is no overflow)

Unbounded

boundedness1
Boundedness
  • Boundedness: the number of tokens in any place cannot grow indefinitely
    • (1-bounded also called safe)
    • Application: places represent buffers and registers (check there is no overflow)

Unbounded

boundedness2
Boundedness
  • Boundedness: the number of tokens in any place cannot grow indefinitely
    • (1-bounded also called safe)
    • Application: places represent buffers and registers (check there is no overflow)

Unbounded

boundedness3
Boundedness
  • Boundedness: the number of tokens in any place cannot grow indefinitely
    • (1-bounded also called safe)
    • Application: places represent buffers and registers (check there is no overflow)

Unbounded

boundedness4
Boundedness
  • Boundedness: the number of tokens in any place cannot grow indefinitely
    • (1-bounded also called safe)
    • Application: places represent buffers and registers (check there is no overflow)

Unbounded

conservation
Conservation
  • Conservation: the total number of tokens in the net is constant

Not conservative

conservation1
Conservation
  • Conservation: the total number of tokens in the net is constant

Not conservative

conservation2
Conservation
  • Conservation: the total number of tokens in the net is constant

Conservative

2

2

analysis techniques
Analysis techniques
  • Structural analysis techniques
    • Incidence matrix
    • T- and S- Invariants
  • State Space Analysis techniques
    • Coverability Tree
    • Reachability Graph
incidence matrix

-1 0 0

1 1 -1

0 -1 1

A=

Incidence Matrix

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

  • Necessary condition for marking M to be reachable from initial marking M0:

there exists firing vector v s.t.:

M = M0 + A v

t1

t2

t3

p1

t3

p2

p3

state equations

p1

t1

p2

p3

-1 0 0

1 1 -1

0 -1 1

A=

t3

1

0

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

-1 0 0

1 1 -1

0 -1 1

1

0

1

=

+

v1 =

State equations

t2

  • E.g. reachability of M =|0 0 1|T from M0 = |1 0 0|T

but also v2 = | 1 1 2 |T or any vk = | 1 (k) (k+1) |T

necessary condition only
Necessary Condition only

t2

t3

t1

2

2

Firing vector: (1,2,2)

Deadlock!!

state equations and invariants

-1 0 0

1 1 -1

0 -1 1

A=

State equations and invariants
  • Solutions of Ax = 0 (in M = M0 + Ax, M = M0)

T-invariants

    • sequences of transitions that (if fireable) bring back to original marking
    • periodic schedule in SDF
    • e.g. x =| 0 1 1 |T

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

t3

application of t invariants
Application of T-invariants
  • Scheduling
    • Cyclic schedules: need to return to the initial state

i

o

+

*k2

*k1

T-invariant: (1,1,1,1,1)

Schedule: i *k2 *k1 + o

state equations and invariants1
State equations and invariants
  • Solutions of yA = 0

S-invariants

    • sets of places whose weighted total token count does not change after the firing of any transition (y M = y M’)
    • e.g. y =| 1 1 1 |T

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

-1 1 0

0 1 -1

0 -1 1

AT=

t3

application of s invariants
Application of S-invariants
  • Structural Boundedness: bounded for any finite initial marking M0
  • Existence of a positive S-invariant is CS for structural boundedness
    • initial marking is finite
    • weighted token count does not change
summary of algebraic methods
Summary of algebraic methods
  • Extremely efficient

(polynomial in the size of the net)

  • Generally provide only necessary or sufficient information
  • Excellent for ruling out some deadlocks or otherwise dangerous conditions
  • Can be used to infer structural boundedness
coverability tree
Coverability Tree
  • Build a (finite) tree representation of the markings

Karp-Miller algorithm

  • Label initial marking M0 as the root of the tree and tag it as new
  • While new markings exist do:
    • select a new marking M
    • if M is identical to a marking on the path from the root to M, then tag M as old and go to another new marking
    • if no transitions are enabled at M, tag M dead-end
    • while there exist enabled transitions at M do:
      • obtain the marking M’ that results from firing t at M
      • on the path from the root to M if there exists a marking M’’ such that M’(p)>=M’’(p) for each place p and M’ is different from M’’, then replace M’(p) by w for each p such that M’(p) >M’’(p)
      • introduce M’ as a node, draw an arc with label t from M to M’ and tag M’ as new.
coverability tree1

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

p4

t3

Coverability Tree

1000

  • Boundedness is decidable

with coverability tree

coverability tree2
Coverability Tree

1000

  • Boundedness is decidable

with coverability tree

t1

0100

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

p4

t3

coverability tree3
Coverability Tree

1000

  • Boundedness is decidable

with coverability tree

t1

0100

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

t3

0011

p4

t3

coverability tree4
Coverability Tree

1000

  • Boundedness is decidable

with coverability tree

t1

0100

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

t3

0011

t2

p4

0101

t3

coverability tree5
Coverability Tree

1000

  • Boundedness is decidable

with coverability tree

Cannot solve the reachability and liveness problems

t1

0100

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

t3

0011

t2

010

p4

t3

coverability tree6
Coverability Tree

1000

  • Boundedness is decidable

with coverability tree

Cannot solve the reachability and liveness problems

t1

0100

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

t3

0011

t2

010

p4

t3

reachability graph

t2

p1

t1

p2

p3

t3

Reachability graph
  • For bounded nets the Coverability Tree is called Reachability Tree since it contains all possible reachable markings

100

reachability graph1
Reachability graph

t2

  • For bounded nets the Coverability Tree is called Reachability Tree since it contains all possible reachable markings

p1

t1

p2

p3

100

t1

010

t3

reachability graph2
Reachability graph

t2

  • For bounded nets the Coverability Tree is called Reachability Tree since it contains all possible reachable markings

p1

t1

p2

p3

100

t1

010

t3

t3

001

reachability graph3
Reachability graph

t2

  • For bounded nets the Coverability Tree is called Reachability Tree since it contains all possible reachable markings

p1

t1

p2

p3

100

t1

010

t3

t2

t3

001

subclasses of petri nets
Subclasses of Petri nets
  • Reachability analysis is too expensive
  • State equations give only partial information
  • Some properties are preserved by reduction rules

e.g. for liveness and safeness

  • Even reduction rules only work in some cases
  • Must restrict class in order to prove stronger results
subclasses of petri nets sms
Subclasses of Petri nets: SMs
  • State machine: every transition has at most 1 predecessor and 1 successor
  • Models only causality and conflict
    • (no concurrency, no synchronization of parallel activities)
subclasses of petri nets mgs
Subclasses of Petri nets: MGs
  • Marked Graph: every place has at most 1 predecessor and 1 successor
  • Models only causality and concurrency (no conflict)
  • Same as underlying graph of SDF
subclasses of petri nets fc nets
Subclasses of Petri nets: FC nets
  • Free-Choice net: every transition after choice has exactly1 predecessor
free choice petri nets fcpn
Free-Choice Petri Nets (FCPN)

Free-Choice (FC)

t1

t2

Confusion (not-Free-Choice)

Extended Free-Choice

  • Free-Choice: the outcome of a choice depends on the value of a token (abstracted non-deterministically) rather than on its arrival time.
      • Easy to analyze
free choice nets
Free-Choice nets
  • Introduced by Hack (‘72)
  • Extensively studied by Best (‘86) and Desel and Esparza (‘95)
  • Can express concurrency, causality and choice without confusion
  • Very strong structural theory
    • necessary and sufficient conditions for liveness and safeness, based on decomposition
    • concurrency, causality and choice relations are mutually exclusive
    • exploits duality between MG and SM
mg sm decomposition
MG (& SM) decomposition
  • An Allocation is a control function that chooses which transition fires among several conflicting ones ( A: P T).
  • Eliminate the subnet that would be inactive if we were to use the allocation...
  • Reduction Algorithm
    • Delete all unallocated transitions
    • Delete all places that have all input transitions already deleted
    • Delete all transitions that have at least one input place already deleted
  • Obtain a Reduction(one for each allocation) that is a conflict free subnet
mg reduction and cover
MG reduction and cover
  • Choose one successor for each conflicting place:
mg reduction and cover1
MG reduction and cover
  • Choose one successor for each conflicting place:
mg reduction and cover2
MG reduction and cover
  • Choose one successor for each conflicting place:
mg reduction and cover3
MG reduction and cover
  • Choose one successor for each conflicting place:
mg reduction and cover4
MG reduction and cover
  • Choose one successor for each conflicting place:
mg reductions
MG reductions
  • The set of all reductions yields a cover of MG components (T-invariants)
mg reductions1
MG reductions
  • The set of all reductions yields a cover of MG components (T-invariants)
sm reduction and cover
SM reduction and cover
  • Choose one predecessor for each transition:
sm reduction and cover1
SM reduction and cover
  • Choose one predecessor for each transition:
sm reduction and cover2
SM reduction and cover
  • Choose one predecessor for each transition:
  • The set of all reductions yields a cover of SM components (S-invariants)
hack s theorem 72
Hack’s theorem (‘72)
  • Let N be a Free-Choice PN:
    • N has a live and safe initial marking (well-formed) if and only if
      • every MG reduction is strongly connected and not empty, and

the set of all reductions covers the net

      • every SM reduction is strongly connected and not empty, and

the set of all reductions covers the net

hack s theorem
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem1
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem2
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem3
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem4
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem5
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem6
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem7
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem8
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem9
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem10
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem11
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem12
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem13
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem14
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN
hack s theorem15
Hack’s theorem
  • Example of non-live (but safe) FCN

Not live

other results for lsfc nets
Other results for LSFC nets
  • Let t1 and t2 be two transitions of a live and safe Free-Choice net.

Then t1 and t2 are:

    • sequential if

there exists a simple cycle to which both belong

    • concurrent if

they are not ordered, and

there exists an MG component to which both belong

    • conflicting otherwise
summary of lsfc nets
Summary of LSFC nets
  • Largest class for which structural theory really helps
  • Structural component analysis may be expensive

(exponential number of MG and SM components in the worst case)

  • But…
    • number of MG components is generally small
    • FC restriction simplifies characterization of behavior
petri net extensions
Petri Net extensions
  • Add interpretation to tokens and transitions
    • Colored nets (tokens have value)
  • Add time
    • Time/timed Petri Nets (deterministic delay)
      • type (duration, delay)
      • where (place, transition)
    • Stochastic PNs (probabilistic delay)
    • Generalized Stochastic PNs (timed and immediate transitions)
  • Add hierarchy
    • Place Charts Nets
summary of petri nets
Summary of Petri Nets
  • Graphical formalism
  • Distributed state (including buffering)
  • Concurrency, sequencing and choice made explicit
  • Structural and behavioral properties
  • Analysis techniques based on
    • linear algebra (only sufficient)
    • structural analysis (necessary and sufficient only for FC)
ad