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C HAPTER T WELVE

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C HAPTER T WELVE. Contingency Theories of Leadership. M4. M3. M2. M1. SLT Prescriptions For Most Appropriate Behaviors Based On Follower Maturity. Participating (Lo T, Hi R). Selling (Hi T, Hi R). Relationship behaviors. Delegating (Lo T, Lo R). Telling (Hi T, Lo R).

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c hapter t welve

CHAPTERTWELVE

Contingency Theories of Leadership

slt prescriptions for most appropriate behaviors based on follower maturity

M4

M3

M2

M1

SLT Prescriptions For Most Appropriate Behaviors Based On Follower Maturity

Participating (Lo T, Hi R)

Selling (Hi T, Hi R)

Relationshipbehaviors

Delegating (Lo T, Lo R)

Telling (Hi T, Lo R)

Task behaviors

Follower maturity

components of follower maturity
Components Of Follower Maturity
  • Job maturity – the amount of task-relevant knowledge, experience, skill, and ability that the follower possesses.
  • Psychological maturity – the follower’s self-confidence, commitment, motivation and self-respect relative to the task at hand.
factors from the situational leadership theory and the interactional framework
Factors From the Situational Leadership Theory and the Interactional Framework

Leader

Telling High task, low relationship

Selling: High task, high relationship

Participating: Low task, low relationship

Delegating: Low task, low relationship

Outcomes:

Task accomplishment

Increased follower maturity (if developmental interventions used)

Decision to use developmental intervention

What is the task to be accomplished?

What is the followers’ job maturity?

Psychological maturity?

Situation

Followers

contingency theory

Contingency Theory

Leader effectiveness is primarily determined by selecting the right kind of leader for a certain situation or changing the situation to fit the particular leader’s style.

motivational hierarchies for low and high lpc leaders

People

Task

Task

People

Low-LPC leader motivational hierarchy

High-LPC leader motivational hierarchy

Motivational Hierarchies For Low- and High-LPC Leaders
contingency model octant structure for determining situational favorability
Contingency Model Octant Structure For Determining Situational Favorability

Overall situation favorability

High

Low

Leader-member relations

Task structure

Position power

Octant

factors from fiedler s contingency theory and the interactional framework
Factors From Fiedler’s Contingency Theory and the Interactional Framework

Leader

Outcomes:

Effective or ineffective group performance based upon match or mismatch between leader and overall favorability of the leadership situation

Motivation hierarchy (as determined by LPC score)

Leader-member relations

Task structure

Position power

Followers

Situation

four leader behaviors of path goal theory
Four Leader Behaviors of Path-Goal Theory
  • Directive
  • Supportive
  • Participative
  • Achievement-oriented
interaction between followers locus of control scores and leader behavior in decision making
Interaction Between Followers’ Locus of Control Scores and Leader Behavior in Decision Making

External locus of control followers

Internal locus of control followers

High

Follower satisfaction with leader

Low

Participative

Directive

Leader behavior in decision making

examples of applying path goal theory

Newly formed work unit

Directive behaviors (tell followers what to do and how to do it)

Reduced role ambiguity (clearer effort-to-performance links)

Higher effort

Higher satisfaction

Substandard performance (no rewards for performance)

Directive behaviors (make rewards available and contingent on performance)

Clearer performance-to-reward links (increased valence)

Higher effort

Higher satisfaction

Examples of Applying Path-Goal Theory

Situation

Leader

Followers

Outcomes

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