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The Devious Logic of Metaphor. Leroy Searle University of Washington. Metaphor as an Instrument of Relation. Type 1: Attribute Matching e.g. My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose Type 2: Analogy & Substitution e.g. The eye of heaven Type 3: Problematic Intensionality

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the devious logic of metaphor

The Devious Logic of Metaphor

Leroy Searle

University of Washington

metaphor as an instrument of relation
Metaphor as an Instrument of Relation
  • Type 1: Attribute Matching
  • e.g. My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose
  • Type 2: Analogy & Substitution
  • e.g. The eye of heaven
  • Type 3: Problematic Intensionality
  • Type 4: Association Restriction
  • (acres of illustrations)
1 attribute matching a r b
1: Attribute Matching: A—r—B
  • A Red, Red Rose
  • O my luve\'s like a red, red rose
  • That\'s newly sprung in June;
  • O mu luve\'s like the melodie
  • That\'s sweetly play\'d in tune.
  • As fair art thou, my bonie lass,
  • So deep in luve am I;
  • And I will luve thee still, my dear,
  • Till a\' the seas gang dry.
  • Till a\' the seas gang dry, my dear,
  • And the rocks melt wi\' the sun;
  • O I will luve thee still, my dear
  • While the sands o\' life shall run.
  • And fare-thee-weel, my only Luve!
  • And fare-thee-weel awhile!
  • And I will come again, my luve,
  • Tho\' \'twere ten thousand miles.
  • O my luve\'s like a red, red rose,
  • That\'s newly sprung in June;
  • O my luve\'s like the melodie
  • That\'s sweetly play\'d in tune.
  • --Robert Burns

Love Rose Melody in tune

-fresh -fresh -fresh?

-beautiful -beautiful -beautiful

-[animal] -plant -abstract

-smell -smell -?

-? -thorns -?

-? -aphids -?

-pleasing -pleasing -pleasing

2 analogy substitution
2: Analogy & Substitution
  • XVIII
  • Shall I compare thee to a summer\'s day?
  • Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
  • Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
  • And summer\'s lease hath all too short a date:
  • Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
  • And often is his gold complexion dimmed,
  • And every fair from fair sometime declines,
  • By chance, or nature\'s changing course untrimmed:
  • But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
  • Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow\'st,
  • Nor shall death brag thou wander\'st in his shade,
  • When in eternal lines to time thou grow\'st,
  • So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
  • So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
  • --William Shakespeare

eye: face :: sun : heaven

eye of heaven

but not:

sun of face

3 problematic intensionality violation of expectations
3: Problematic Intensionality: Violation of expectations
  • The Sick Rose
  • O Rose thou art sick.
  • The invisible worm,
  • That files in the night
  • In the howling storm:
  • Has found out thy bed
  • Of crimson joy:
  • And his dark secret love
  • Does thy life destroy
  • --William Blake
4 associational restrictions
4. Associational Restrictions
  • 986

A narrow Fellow in the Grass

Occasionally rides—

You may have met Him—did you not

His notice sudden is—

The Grass divides as with a Comb—

A spotted shaft is seen—

And then it closes at your feet

And opens further on—

He likes a Boggy Acre

A Floor too cool for Corn—

Yet when a Boy, and Barefoot—

I more than once at Noon

Have passed, I thought, a Whip lash

Unbraiding in the Sun

When stooping to secure it

It wrinked, and was gone—

Several of Nature’s People

I know, and they know me—

I feel for them a transport

Of cordiality—

But never met this Fellow

Attended, or alone

Without a tighter breathing

And Zero at the Bone—

--Emily Dickinson

By Noun

By Verb

By Modifier

By Syntax

By Convention

Also: Allusions, Quotations, &c.

mediating functions topic comment grammar
Mediating Functions / Topic – Comment Grammar

TOPIC COMMENT

[community] [history]

{First}*

Selecting

identifying structuring

P: :S

[Perception Cognition] [Syntax Situation]

-predicating-

{Third }*

processing

{Second}*

* Categories of Charles Sanders Peirce

computer poetry
Computer Poetry

Shall I compare thee to a noxious bed?

Thou art more like a graceful squalid egg:

For none will ever warmly call thee red

Until, my elk, they see us choke a leg.

My heart is crimson, likewise is it blue,

When e\'er I see the hopeless maidens growl;

I stunned the reckless butler - for a gnu

Had crudely whistled as it found a fowl.

Alas! the days of android, blob and pine

Are gone, and now the stainless scarecrows fume;

Icelandic was the reindeer, now so fine

And vermin cannot heat the chuckling broom.

But thou, my falling gorgon, shalt not write

Until we firmly stand at Heaven\'s light.

  • --Jonathan R. Partington
  • http://www.geocities.com/j_r_partington/sonnet.html
canons of logic
‘Canons’ of Logic
  • (1) the law of contradiction,
    • for all propositions p, it is impossible for both p and not p to be true
  • (2) the law of excluded middle (or third),
    • either p or ~p must be true, there being no third or middle true proposition between them
  • (3) the principle of identity.
    • a thing is identical with itself, x=x.
    • BUT:
    • (1) presupposes uniform intensionality, and is therefore not criteriological for truth or falsity if that condition is not established: it is a felicity condition for decisions;
    • (2) presupposes that the formation of predicates is either exhaustive or unproblematic; it is therefore a felicity condition for the selection or formulation of predicates;
    • (3) is a logical prejudice deriving from an uncritical acceptance of (1) & (2) as unproblematic. It further assumes that the only mode of being is the being of a thing.
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