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Review of Local Employment Initiatives in Middlesbrough Presentation of Shared Intelligence findings Mark Evershed 15 April 2005. Objectives of the research. assess current and future needs – supply and demand scan current/future policy & delivery at national, regional & local level

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Review of

Local Employment Initiatives

in Middlesbrough

Presentation of Shared Intelligence findings

Mark Evershed

15 April 2005


Objectives of the research
Objectives of the research

  • assess current and future needs – supply and demand

  • scan current/future policy & delivery at national, regional & local level

  • identify ‘preferred model’ of provision for supporting access to the labour market

  • evaluate current provision & identify gaps/opportunities

  • develop strategy/action plan


Methodology
Methodology

  • Stage 1: Assessment of need and overview of provision

  • Stage 2: Develop preferred approach

  • Stage 3: Develop strategy and action plan


Context
Context

  • Shifting focus from unemployment to worklessness

  • Middlesbrough one of worst 6 concentrations in England

  • new DWP Strategy

    • changes to benefits regime

    • Increased flexibilities & freedoms for mainstream programmes


Background key statistics
Background - key statistics

  • demographic change - 17-44 age group to decline by 11% to 2016

  • educational attainment improving but still poor

    • 39% of pupils achieve 5 GCSEs A-C

    • poor literacy (29% of adults) & numeracy (31%) well above England average (24%)

  • widespread deprivation

    • Middlesbrough ranked 4th worst local authority in 2004 IMD (concentration of deprivation)

    • four SOAs in worst 100 (out of 32,382) in England (Middlehaven x2, Gresham, Clairville)


Background key statistics1
Background - key statistics

  • economic transition ….

    • modest growth since ‘97

    • shift towards service sector employment & part-time jobs

    • skills shortages & hard to fill vacancies

  • employment rate (63.5% very low (cf GB 74.3%)


Worklessness
Worklessness

  • 22.4% of Mbro working age population on some form of benefit (GB 13.5%)

  • 16 of Middlesbrough’s 22 wards are in worst 20% for employment deprivation


Unemployment
Unemployment

  • JSA claimant count unemployment high – 4.6% Jan 05 (GB 2.4%) - but fell by 35% since January 2001

  • 51.3% of claimants aged 25-50; just 12.8% are 17-19

  • 45% have been claiming JSA for more than 26 weeks

  • wards with highest % unemployment are:

    • North Ormesby/Brambles Farm (11.2%)

    • Beckfield (8.1%)


Incapacity benefit income support
Incapacity benefit/Income Support

  • 13% of Mbro working age population on sick/disabled benefits (GB 8.6%)

  • just over 20,000 residents on IB/IS – more than 5x no of JSA claimants

  • IB/IS claimant count has remained static since 2002

  • 50% of IB claimants have been claiming >12 months


A view from the sharp end 1
A view from the sharp end (1)

  • Qualitative research with 50 individuals to consider needs, barriers, effectiveness of current support:

    • young people

    • lone parents

    • BME residents

    • long-term unemployed

    • people with disabilities

  • reinforced perceptions of key barriers to work:

    • health

    • childcare

    • transport

    • postcode discrimination

    • Benefits System

    • skills levels

    • housing


A view from the sharp end 2
A view from the sharp end (2)

  • …but also highlighted

    • impact of low self-esteem, confidence and aspirations

    • mismatch between career aspirations and available employment – poor quality of entry level jobs

    • constraints on JC+ resources; still perceived as ‘benefits police’

    • complex progression routes - ‘customer journey’ is often unclear

    • limited recognition of overseas qualifications


Current provision what s working well
Current provision – what’s working well?

  • more than 50 separate initiatives, ranging from national programmes/pilots to locally funded/targeted projects:

    • Employment Zone/WiN/Action Team – flexibilities & freedoms to tailor mainstream provision

    • projects engaging hard to reach groups (e.g. MiLE, Grange Rd)

    • Job brokerage – complements mainstream provision

    • Hemlington Works – holistic approach to service provision

    • sector-based approach – Building Bureau


Current provision working less well
Current provision: working less well?

  • some (limited) evidence of duplication of provision

  • often funding regimes do not promote progression

  • lack of in-work support/mentoring

  • not enough IAG advisors

  • stronger links required between Connexions and employers?

  • many neighbourhoods currently access extensive support – but some programmes/funding streams due to end in 2006


Learning from good practice
Learning from good practice

  • Research has examined a range of initiatives:

    • Full Employment Areas (Liverpool, Renfrewshire)

    • Streets Ahead (Liverpool)

    • New Futures Fund (Careers Scotland)

    • health projects (Compass Project, Healthy Working Lives, Starting Well)

    • Strive (Harlesden) – US model


Learning from good practice1
Learning from good practice

  • freedoms and flexibilities – e.g. EZ/Action Teams – reduce barriers

  • strong focus on engaging the hard to reach

  • independent personal advisors/key workers who broker support and handhold

  • flexible provision – purchased when needed

  • deal with “person first “

  • holistic approach (health, family, confidence)


Local Employment Strategy:

Aim:

‘to achieve full employment in Middlesbrough by 2015


Local employment strategy
Local Employment Strategy

  • Full employment:

    • Everyone who wants to work can quickly find a job

    • No groups are excluded or disadvantaged in the labour market

    • There are real prospects for progression at work

    • Poverty in work is eradicated

  • defined as GB average JSA claimant count and employment rate of 80%

  • Achieving GB average today would require 8,600 more Middlesbrough residents in employment; local economy currently growing at 500 jobs p.a.

  • LES is focused on supply-side – recognise demand-side is critical

  • making mainstream


Objectives
Objectives

  • build consensus on local needs & priorities and develop provision to address gaps

  • provide a framework to coordinate and target delivery

  • influence and add value to delivery of mainstream programmes


Partnership
Partnership

  • a stronger, focused partnership involving JC+, Council, Network of Intermediaries and others; this would

    • clearly define delivery roles & responsibilities

    • work with other partners (social work, health etc) to strengthen referral routes and promote progression

    • align funding and resources; move towards joint commissioning and re-commissioning of projects

    • provide capacity building and support to local organisations

    • maintain overview of local needs/priorities - monitor, evaluate and update Local Employment Strategy


Partnership1

Local Strategic Partnership

Integrate with community strategy

  • Economic Vitality Group

    • updating the LES

    • defining roles and responsibilities

  • Executive

  • Middlesbrough Works

    • aligning funding and resources

    • direct commissioning and performance management

Delivery partners

Project delivery

Partnership


Proposals 1
Proposals (1)

  • seek to influence delivery of mainstream programmes

    • more emphasis on engaging/supporting hardest to reach in the community – key worker approach

    • holistic view of client needs – ‘person first’;

    • stronger focus on in-work support

    • widen flexibilities/freedoms in most employment deprived wards, building on DWP strategy


Proposals 2
Proposals (2)

  • extend EZ/Action Team flexibilities/freedoms to enhance mainstream support in 12 wards:

    • minimum eligibility criteria – unemployed or economically inactive

    • increased no of personal advisors to broker support

    • all individuals to benefit from full range of support offered

    • funding to follow the individual, rather than the provider

    • stop the clock' allowing individuals to address key barriers without penalty

    • in-work support for a minimum of 26 weeks built into all programmes

    • rewards for effective partnership working

    • enhanced travel subsidies and support with childcare costs


Proposals 3
Proposals (3)

  • commission new local initiatives to plug gaps:

    • support for long-term IB/IS claimants (pre P2W)

    • strengthen role of public sector in providing apprenticeships, work placements etc

    • sector-specific customised training

    • sector-specific ILMs

    • enhanced employment support for 16-19 year olds

    • work-based ESOL


Group discussion
Group discussion:

  • is full employment the right aspiration for the strategy?

  • is the Partnership vehicle right?

  • views on proposals

    • Extending flexibilities and freedoms for mainstream provision in target wards

    • local projects to address gaps

  • what – if any – are the risks and barriers to delivery?


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