Overview of the Smarter Balanced Assessment: Grades 6-12
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 50

Overview of the Smarter Balanced Assessment: Grades 6-12 ~ Making the Classroom Connection~ PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 72 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Overview of the Smarter Balanced Assessment: Grades 6-12 ~ Making the Classroom Connection~ Create by Penny Plavala, Multnoama h ESD. Session Goals. • Review how Common Core State Standards will be assessed • Review the Smarter Balanced Assessment Components

Download Presentation

Overview of the Smarter Balanced Assessment: Grades 6-12 ~ Making the Classroom Connection~

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

Overview of the Smarter Balanced Assessment: Grades 6-12

~ Making the Classroom Connection~

Create by Penny Plavala, MultnoamahESD


Session goals

Session Goals

• Review how Common Core State Standards will be

assessed

• Review the Smarter Balanced Assessment Components

• Examine a Performance Task

• Identify Key Skills for Student Success


What will be tested

What Will Be Tested?

Place text here


Common core timeline

Common Core Timeline

YOU ARE HERE

2014 -2015

2013 – 2014

Next

Generation

Assessment

Grade 6, 7, 10 this year:

First group of 7th, 8th, & 11th graders


Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

Developing the

Common Core Assessment


What is the smarter balance assessment consortium

What is the Smarter Balance Assessment Consortium?

  • SBAC is a groupof 25 states that have been working collaboratively to develop next-generation assessments that are aligned to the CCSS and that accurately measure student progress toward college and career readiness.

    www.smarterbalanced.org

  • The other consortium: PARCC ~ Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers


Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

SBAC Member States

Six ODE staff members are on SBAC Work Groups

SMARTER: Summative Multi-State Assessment

Resources for Teachers and Educational Researchers


Smarter balanced assessment system components

Smarter Balanced Assessment SystemComponents

Summative assessments

Benchmarked to college and career readiness

Teachers and schools have information and tools they need to improve teaching and learning

Common Core State Standards specify

K-12 expectations for college and career readiness

All students leave high school college and career ready

Teacher resources for

formative assessment practices

to improve instruction

Interim assessments Flexible, open, used for actionable feedback


Summative vs formative assessments

Summative vs. Formative Assessments

An event after learning

Chapter test, state assessment, end-of-year placement test

Used to measure achievement

A process during learning

Descriptive feedback, use of rubrics, student self-assessment

Used to support ongoing growth, improvement

Summative

Formative


The sbac assessment system

The SBAC Assessment System

English Language Arts and Mathematics, Grades 3 – 8 and High School

Optional Interim assessment system —

no stakes

Summative assessment for accountability

Last 12 weeks of year*

DIGITAL CLEARINGHOUSE of formative tools, processes and exemplars; released items and tasks; model curriculum units; educator training; professional development tools and resources; an interactive reporting system; scorer training modules; and teacher collaboration tools.

INTERIM ASSESSMENT

INTERIM ASSESSMENT

  • PERFORMANCE

  • TASKS

    • Reading

    • Writing

    • Math

COMPUTER

ADAPTIVE ASSESSMENT

Computer Adaptive Assessment and Performance Tasks

Computer Adaptive Assessment and Performance Tasks

Scope, sequence, number, and timing of interim assessments locally determined

* Time windows may be adjusted based on results from the research agenda and final implementation decisions.


Components of the summative assessment

Components of the Summative Assessment

+

COMPUTER

ADAPTIVE

ASSESSMENT

PERFORMANCE TASKS

  • A computer adaptive assessment

  • given during final 12 weeks of the

  • school year*

  • Multiple item types, scored by

  • computer: 45-60 items per test

  • Measure the ability to integrate

  • knowledge and skills, as required

  • in CCSS

  • Computer-delivered, during final

  • 12 weeks of the school year*

  • Scored by teachers.

  • Scores from the performance assessment and the computer adaptive

  • assessment will be combined for annual accountability scores.

* Time windows may be adjusted based on results from the research agenda and final implementation decisions.


Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

What is Computer Adaptive Testing?


Computer adaptive testing

Computer Adaptive Testing


Assessment item types

Assessment Item Types

  • Selected Response (SR)

  • Variety of multiple choice and true/false

  • Constructed Response (CR)

  • Short or long answer using textual evidence

  • Performance Tasks (PT)

  • Use higher level thinking skills; integrate reading, writing and speaking

  • Technology Enhanced (TE)

  • Technology embedded into items


Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

Smarter Item Types

  • Multiple Choice

  • Assess a broad range of content.

  • Scoring is objective, fast, and generates immediate results.

  • Difficult to understand a student’s reasoning process and to assess higher-order thinking skills.

  • Selected Response


Components of selected response items

Componentsof Selected Response Items

Lizards are fascinating creatures. There are over 3,000 known species, including monitors, skinks, geckos, chameleons, and iguanas, and they vary greatly in appearance. The largest lizard, the Komodo dragon, can grow over ten feet long, and the smallest, the Jaragua lizard, can fit on a dime. Skinks usually have smooth scales like snakes, iguanas have mohawk-like crests running down their backs, and the moloch is covered with spikes from head to tail. Lizards vary in color from shades of gray and brown to bright red or green, spotted or striped. Most have four legs but some are legless and easily confused with snakes (Hint: if it has external eardrums and eyelids it’s a lizard). Geckos can walk up walls. Chameleons not only change color but also have prehensile tails, similar to those of monkeys, that wrap around branches and their eyes can move in different directions.

What is the best way to revise the highlighted sentence to match the language and style of the paragraph?

  • Geckos are able to adhere to flush surfaces because setae on their footpads facilitate van der Waals forces between the setae structures and the surface.

  • Geckos are awesome because they have sticky toes that allow them to climb windows like Spiderman.

  • Geckos have the remarkable ability to walk up walls thanks to tiny hair-like structures on their toes that cling to smooth surfaces.

  • Geckos scurry up walls like tiny dancers gliding effortlessly across a stage, their movements as

(Reading Passage)

STIMULUS

What is the best way to revise the highlighted sentence to match the language and style of the paragraph?

STEM

  • Geckos are able to adhere to flush surfaces because setae on their footpads facilitate van der Waals forces between the setae structures and the surface.

  • Geckos are awesome because they have sticky toes that allow them to climb windows like Spiderman.

  • Geckos have the remarkable ability to walk up walls thanks to tiny hair-like structures on their toes that cling to smooth surfaces.

  • Geckos scurry up walls like tiny dancers gliding effortlessly across a stage, their movements as natural as a well-rehearsed ballet.

OPTIONS


Selected response

Selected Response

  • Read the sentence from the text. Then answer the question.

  • “Nanodiamonds are stardust, created when ancient stars exploded

  • long ago, disgorging their remaining elements into space.”

  • Based on the context of the sentence, what is the most precise

  • meaning of disgorging?

    • • scattering randomly

    • • throwing out quickly

    • • spreading out widely

    • • casting out violently

    • 11th grade


Selected response single response multiple choice

Selected ResponseSingle Response – Multiple Choice

Many experts will tell you that television is bad for you. Yet this is an exaggeration. Many television programs today are specifically geared towards improving physical fitness, making people smarter, or teaching them important things about the world. The days of limited programming with little interaction are gone. Public television and other stations have shows about science, history, and technical topics.

Which sentence should be added to the paragraph to state the author’s main claim?

A. Watching television makes a person healthy.

B. Watching television can be a sign of intelligence.

C. Television can be a positive influence on people.

D. Television has more varied programs than ever before.

8th grade


Selected response multiple response

Selected ResponseMultiple Response

  • Read the sentence containing a main idea and the directions that follow.

  • Experiments show elephants understand that cooperation

  • brings benefits to everyone involved.

  • Select the two key details from the text that support the main idea.

  • A) One will wait alone at the rope until another comes to help pull.

  • B) They give hugs and call each other by using their trunks as trumpets.

  • C) Experiments like the simple pull-together test give scientists a way to begin to learn.

  • D) Animals received corn treats only if both pulled the rope ends at the same

  • time with their trunks.

  • E) Two elephants can pull on rope ends at the same time to get corn close

  • enough for both to eat.

    • 8th grade


Turn and talk

Turn and Talk

  • When do you use Selected Response questions in your classroom?

  • How might you include them in your formative and summative assessments?


Smarter item types

Smarter Item Types

  • Multiple Choice

  • Assess a broad range of content.

  • Scoring is objective, fast, and generates immediate results.

  • Difficult to understand a student’s reasoning process and to assess higher-order thinking skills.

  • Selected Response

  • Require the student to generate a response as opposed to selecting a response.

  • Include both short and extended responses.

  • Allow students to demonstrate their use of complex thinking skills consistent with the expectations for college and career readiness.

  • Constructed Response


Components of a constructed response item

Components of a Constructed Response Item

  • (Reading Passage)

  • The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf

  • A Shepherd's Boy was tending his flock near a village, and thought it would be great fun to trick the villagers by pretending that a Wolf was attacking the sheep: so he shouted out, "Wolf! Wolf!" and when the people came running up he laughed at them because they believed him. He did this more than once, and every time the villagers found they had been tricked, for there was no Wolf at all. At last a Wolf really did come, and the Boy cried, "Wolf! Wolf!" as loud as he could: but the people were so used to hearing him call that they took no notice of his cries for help. And so no one came to help the boy, and the Wolf attacked the sheep.

  • In a few sentences, explain what lesson the reader can learn from the shepherd’s boy. Use details from the story to support your response.

STIMULUS

STEM

  • In a few sentences, explain what lesson the reader can learn from the shepherd’s boy. Use details from the story to support your response.

SPACE FOR ANSWER


Scoring a constructed response item

Scoring a Constructed Response Item


Constructed response

Constructed Response

Read this sentence from the passage.

“Besides being beautiful to contemplate, space diamonds teach us

important lessons about natural processes going on in the universe, and

suggest new ways that diamonds can be created here on Earth.”

Explain how information learned from space diamonds can help scientists make diamonds on Earth. Use evidence from the passage to support your answer.

Type your answer in the space provided.

11th grade


Constructed response1

Constructed Response

What are some ways in which the Mexican free-tails are unique among bat species?

Use at least two details from the presentation to support your answer.

Type your answer in the space provided.

7th grade


Turn and talk1

Turn and Talk

  • When skills do students need to answer ConstructedResponse questions?


Smarter item types1

Smarter Item Types

  • Multiple Choice

  • Assess a broad range of content.

  • Scoring is objective, fast, and generates immediate results.

  • Difficult to understand a student’s reasoning process and to assess higher-order thinking skills.

  • Selected Response

  • Require the student to generate a response as opposed to selecting a response.

  • Include both short and extended responses.

  • Allow students to demonstrate their use of complex thinking skills consistent with the expectations for college and career readiness.

  • Constructed Response

  • Students manipulate information (example: drag and drop)

  • May have digital media for stimulus: video, animation, sound.

  • Technology Enhanced


Technology based items

Technology-Based Items

  • Technology-enhanced

    • Computer delivered items that include specialized interactions for student responses

  • Technology-enabled

    • Computer delivered items that use digital media such as sound, video, or interactive widgets

Examples:

  • Moving an object to a set of locations (drag and drop)

  • Selecting, copying, pasting blocks of text

  • Listening to a video and answering questions


Technology enhanced s ample item

Technology-Enhanced Sample Item

Below is a poem, a sonnet, in which the speaker discusses her feelings about a relationship. Read the poem and answer the question that follows.

Remember

When you can no more hold me by the hand,

Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay.

Remember me when no more day by day

You tell me of our future that you plann’d:

Only remember me; you understand

It will be late to counsel then or pray.

Yet if you should forget me for a while

And afterwards remember, do not grieve.

For if the darkness and corruption leave

A vestige* of the thoughts that once I had

Better by far you should forget and smile

Than that you should remember and be sad.

*vestige: a mark, trace, or visible evidence of something that is no longer present or evident.

In the sonnet “Remember,” click on the two lines that reveal a change in the speaker’s message to her subject.

9th grade


Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

Technology Enhanced

A student is writing a report for science class. This paragraph from the report contains language that is not appropriate for the audience or the task.

Read the paragraph. Then, click on three words or groups of words that are too vague or informal for a science report.

There are loads of reasons to eat organic food. The term “organic” indicates that the food has been grown without pesticides or other chemicals. A consumer who chooses to eat organic food does not consume any of this bad stuff. Crops that are grown organically are nice for the land because farmers do not have to add chemicals to the soil. Growing organic food also improves the lives of farm workers because they can avoid working with poisons. In sum, everyone benefits from the farming of organic food.

7th grade


Technology enabled

Technology Enabled

Selected Response that Includes Multimedia

Listen to the presentation. Then answer the questions.

Trust Your Feet

What is the narrator’s main purpose in presenting information

about rock climbing?

A. To identify the most challenging places for both beginners and experts

B. To provide the listener with techniques essential for successful climbing

C. To introduce the listener to the basic equipment used in climbing

D. To describe the personal characteristics of expert rock climbers

8th grade


Technology enabled1

Technology Enabled

Note: Split screen is what students will see throughout the test.

6th grade


Group discussion

Group Discussion

• What skills do students need to be successful on the

three types of items we reviewed?


Smarter item types2

Smarter Item Types

  • Multiple Choice

  • Assess a broad range of content.

  • Scoring is objective, fast, and generates immediate results.

  • Difficult to understand a student’s reasoning process and to assess higher-order thinking skills.

  • Selected Response

  • Require the student to generate a response as opposed to selecting a response.

  • Include both short and extended responses.

  • Allow students to demonstrate their use of complex thinking skills consistent with the expectations for college and career readiness.

  • Constructed Response

  • Students manipulate information (example: drag and drop)

  • May have digital media for stimulus: video, animation, sound.

  • Technology Enhanced

  • Measure multiple claims

  • Require students to demonstrate ability to think and reason, and produce fully developed products.

  • Provide evidence of college and career readiness.

  • Performance Tasks


Performance tasks

Performance Tasks

  • Extended projects demonstrate real world writing

  • and analytical skills

  • Require 1-2 class periods to complete

  • Included in both interim and summative assessments

  • Applicable in all grades being assessed

  • Evaluated by teachers using consistent scoring rubrics


Components of a performance task

Components of a Performance Task

Can use up to five different stimuli for middle and high school.

Emphasis on stimuli related to science, history, and social studies.


Shifting to sbac assessments

Shifting to SBAC Assessments

  • • Grade 11 students will be assessed in 2014-15 using

  • the SBAC assessments

  • • They will not be assessed using the statewide

  • writing process we use now at 11th grade:

  • - choose one of three prompts

    • - assessed with ODE 6-trait, 6-point scoring guide


Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

• Not looking to assess surface knowledge or literal comprehension• Performance tasks attempt to tap a deeper understanding on the part of the student

• Use reading passages from science, social studies, CTE,

Language Arts, health, etc.

• Students write about what they

read.


Let s explore the components of a performance task

Let’s explore the components of a performance task.

  • • Middle School: 7th grade “Napping”

  • • High School: 11th grade “Public Art”

  • Source: SBAC Practice Test, May 2013


  • Groups of four indicate a d

    Groups of Four: Indicate A-D

    High School School

    One person reads aloud pg. 1

    Independent Work:

    A: Read Source #1

    B: Read Source #2 + pg. 8

    C: Read Source #3

    D: Read Source 4

    After 5 min., each member shares

    a 2 min. summary of what they read

    As a group, review pg. 7 and

    writing rubric on last page.

    Middle School

    One person reads aloud pg. 1

    Independent Work:

    A:Read pg. 2

    B:Read pg. 3 (first 5 paragraphs)

    C:Read pg. 3 (last 2 paragraphs +

    5 paragraphs on page 4)

    D:Read pg. 4-5 Dear Dr. V + pg. 7

    After 5 min., each member shares a 2 min. summary of what they read

    As a group, review pg. 6 and writing rubric on last page.


    Group discussion1

    Group Discussion

    • What skills are required for students to successfully

    complete this task?

    • What “instructional shifts” are required to help

    students build these skills?

    Report out!


    Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

    • • We must prepare students for a very different type of

    • performance assessment that may include:

      • Taking notes while watching a video

      • Taking notes when reading an article, short story, etc.

      • Answering Constructed Response questions (use evidence)

      • Participating in small group discussions

      • Analyzing, synthesizing, evaluating, and integrating

      • information read in order to write a complete essay


    Additional information

    Additional Information

    • Updated SBAC Writing Rubrics released in August 2013.

    • Rubrics have not been field tested.

    • These are not final drafts. Expect revisions.

    • Anchor papers are expected in fall 2014.


    Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

    Estimated testing times for

    Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments

    Times are estimates of test length for most students.

    Students are allowed more time, if needed.


    Sbac timeline

    SBAC Timeline

    Field testing of summative assessment, training school- and district-level staff in formative tools

    Technology readiness tool available

    Teams of teachers evaluate formative assessment practices and curriculum resources

    Full implementation of assessment system

    Writing and Review of Pilot Items/Tasks (including Cognitive Labs and Small-Scale Trials)

    Formative tools available to teachers

    Content and Item Specifications Development

    Writing and Review

    Items/Tasks for Field Testing

    (throughout the

    school year)

    Pilot Testing of Summative and Interim Items/Tasks Conducted


    Common core solutions

    Common Core Solutions

    • SBAC Practice Test

    • Sample Performance Tasks

    • Frequently Asked Questions

    • CCSS Documents

    • Professional Development Tools

    • And more!

      http://www.mesd.k12.or.us/si/commoncoresolutions/index.html


    Overview of the smarter balanced assessment grades 6 12 making the classroom connection

    Please thank your partner and

    small group members

    for their good work.


    Ode staff on sbac work groups

    ODE Staff on SBAC Work Groups

    • Kathleen Vanderwall: Item Development

    • Doug Kosty:Sustainability

    • Rachel Aazzerah:Test Administration

    • Holly Carter:Accessibility & Accommodations

    • Mark Freed:Reporting

    • Steve Slater:Scoring and Psychometrics


    Accommodations guidelines pilot test spring 2013

    Accommodations Guidelines: Pilot Test Spring 2013

    Pilot Test Accessibility and Accommodations Guidelines, January 2013 SBAC


  • Login