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M2M Architecture. Inge Grønbæk, Telenor R&I. ETSI Workshop on RFID and The Internet Of Things, 3rd and 4th December 2007 . Outline. Introduction Ubiquitous topology examples Service requirements and API Role of API and example service Requirements Service aggregation and sub-layering

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M2M Architecture

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M2m architecture

M2M Architecture

Inge Grønbæk,

Telenor R&I

ETSI Workshop on RFID and The Internet Of Things, 3rd and 4th December 2007


Outline

Outline

  • Introduction

    • Ubiquitous topology examples

  • Service requirements and API

    • Role of API and example service

    • Requirements

    • Service aggregation and sub-layering

    • RESTful approach to API

    • Allocation of functionality to each layer

  • Architecture

    • New network elements

    • Allocation of functionality to network elements

    • Protocol stacks

    • Reference points and interfaces

    • NGN and IMS capabilities

  • Implementation

    • Alternatives for concrete API

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Example architecture

Example Architecture

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Leaf topology ref fp6 ip runes

Leaf topology – (Ref.FP6 IP “RUNES”)

Telco

hub

Device Network

Service C

co

co

co

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Functionality and network elements

Functionality and network elements

RVS: Rendezvous Server

RH: Resolution Handler

ONS: Object Naming Server

GW: Gateway

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Hit gateway

HIT gateway

  • The HIT gateway supports global addressing while allowing IPv4 addresses. (A single public IP-address is assigned to a gateway potentially controlling large group of COs.)

  • The gateway applies the HIT (Host Identity Tag) for addressing and/or identifying the actual CO.

  • The HIT gateway also support localized mobility management as the IP-address of a CO would only change when the CO moves outside the control of its current gateway.

  • The HIT gateway shall keep track of the location of all COs under its control.

    • Each gateway shall be allocated a coverage area allowing identification of objects within that area.

    • Each gateway shall furthermore keep track of all its physical neighbours to allow extended area search for COs.

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Hit gateway protocol stack

HIT gateway protocol stack

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Host identity protocol security architecture

Host Identity Protocol security architecture

Host Identity (HI) is public/private key pair:

IP header

HIT is

implied

by the SPI

value in

IPsec header

HIP incurs

no per-packet

overhead

IPSec (ESP)

Public key used

by others

to authenticate

control messages

Identity defined

by holder of

private key

Encrypted Header and Transport Payload

SHA-1 hash of public key forms a

“Host Identity Tag (HIT)”

- used where 128 bit fields are needed

- self-referential (i.e., HIT can be

securely used instead of HI)

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Rendezvous server rvs

Rendezvous Server (RVS)

  • The basic functionality of the Rendezvous Server (RVS) is to offer mobility- and multicast group anchoring, i.e. Maintenance of the HIT to address bindings.

    • It will also engage in location of COs outside gateway control.

  • It may also be engaged in traffic forwarding in cases where privacy is required.

  • Event reporting shall also be handled by the RVS serving the target CO (i.e. the CO at which events are monitored for reporting).

    • The Registrar and notification functionality is located at the RVS.

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Name resolution additional to dns

Name resolution (additional to DNS)

  • Resolution Handler (RH)

    • URI -> (HI -> HIT) -> IP address -> CO characteristics (e.g. protocol stack support)

  • Object Name Server (ONS)

    • EPC -> EPC-IS (EPC Information Service offered by manager)

  • EPC-DS (EPC Discovery Services ) an application.

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Gprs hip interworking protocol stack

GPRS/HIP interworking protocol stack

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Co reference points

CO reference points

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Interface at reference point a

Interface at reference point A

  • The initial interface and protocol stack at reference point A is based on the IP protocol as shown in the figure. The choice of lower layer (i.e. sub IP) protocol is not restricted at the interface.

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Interface at reference point b

Interface at reference point B

  • The figure depicts the protocol stack at the CO-core to CO-core NNI. (is considered the best choice to meet the generic CO requirements in the short timeframe).

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Interface at other reference points

Interface at other reference points

  • The interface at reference point C equals reference point B.

  • The interface at reference point D equals reference point A.

  • The interface at reference point E is currently proprietary, but the HIT gateway architecture defined in this document to be applied for mapping between the interface at reference point E and the interface at reference point B (=C).

  • The interface at reference point F equals the reference point B.

  • The interface at reference point G equals reference point B. HIT based nodes communicate transparently (e.g. via or helped by the RVS). The GPRS HIT gateway provides interconnect of the GPRS and CO architectures allowing native non HIT GPRS nodes to communicate with HIT COs.

  • The interface at reference point H is identical to reference point B/C except for the radio access.

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Ngn and ims capabilities

NGN and IMS capabilities

  • IMS may be used to support the functionality of the CO service-primitives.

  • The major challenge is to handle small amounts of real-time data efficient within the session oriented framework of IMS.

  • The Use of the SIP MESSAGE method for such data exchange is a possible solution.

  • A better solution would be to offer a general QoS controlled connectionless service at the network layer, i.e. the IP bearer.

  • The session orientation of IMS makes it very suitable for high volume streaming, but multicast is missing for low volume transient real-time data.

  • The bottom line is that IMS supports high volume streaming very well, but IMS needs to be upgraded to effectively support the class of non session oriented applications.

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Alternative concrete api approaches 1

Alternative concrete API approaches (1)

  • Web Services

    • Parlay

      • CORBA(too heavy)

    • Parlay-X(For IMS service access)

      • Based on SOAP

    • REST (excluding SOAP envelope)

  • J2ME(Not mature before 2010)

  • Native APIs(required for constrained applications)

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


Summary of supported functionality

Summary of supported functionality

  • Ubiquitous (cross domain) support of CO services.

    • Name and addressing flexibility, e.g. not limited by IP constraints.

    • New services require only additional data definitions and builds on existing service components accessed via standard API.

    • CO service connectivity with UMTS/GPRS.

    • Access to OSA Parlay functionality.

  • Security.

  • Privacy (in terms of location and identity).

  • Mobility management (including network mobility).

  • M:N multicast also for mobile objects.

  • Presence, location and Notification.

  • Efficient interfacing of proprietary and/or power constrained devices.

    • Protocol-stack flexibility.

    • Topological hierarchy

RFID and The Internet Of Things, ETSI, December 2007


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