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CPSC 322 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence. December 3, 2004. Things. Slides for the last couple of weeks will be up this weekend. Did I mention that you have a final exam at noon on Friday, December 10, in MCML 166? Check the announcements part of the web page occasionally between

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Cpsc 322 introduction to artificial intelligence

CPSC 322Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

December 3, 2004


Things
Things...

Slides for the last couple of weeks

will be up this weekend.

Did I mention that you have a

final exam at noon on Friday,

December 10, in MCML 166?

Check the announcements part of

the web page occasionally between

now and then in case anything

important comes up.


This should be fun
This should be fun

Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment

First Annual Conference

June 1-3, 2005 in Marina Del Rey, California

www.aiide.org


Learning
Learning

Definition: learning is the adaptive changes that occur in a system which enable that system to perform the same task or similar tasks more efficiently or more effectively over time.

This could mean:

• The range of behaviors is expanded: the agent can

do more

• The accuracy on tasks is improved: the agent can

do things better

• The speed is improved: the agent can do things faster


Learning is about choosing the best representation
Learning is about choosing the best representation

That’s certainly true in a logic-based AI world.

Our arch learner started with some internal representation

of an arch. As examples were presented, the arch learner

modified its internal representation to either make the

representation accommodate positive examples

(generalization) or exclude negative examples

(specialization).

There’s really nothing else the learner could modify...

the reasoning system is what it is. So any learning

problem can be mapped onto one of choosing the

best representation...


Learning is about search
Learning is about search

...but wait, there’s more!

By now, you’ve figured out that the arch learner was

doing nothing more than searching the space of

possible representations, right?

So learning, like everything else, boils down to search.

If that wasn’t obvious, you probably will want to do a

little extra preparation for the final exam....


Same problem different representation
Same problem - different representation

The arch learner could have represented the

arch concept as a decision tree if we wanted


Same problem different representation1
Same problem - different representation

The arch learner could have represented the

arch concept as a decision tree if we wanted

arch


Same problem different representation2
Same problem - different representation

The arch learner could have represented the

arch concept as a decision tree if we wanted

do upright blocks

support sideways block?

no yes

not arch arch


Same problem different representation3
Same problem - different representation

The arch learner could have represented the

arch concept as a decision tree if we wanted

do upright blocks

support sideways block?

no yes

not arch do upright blocks

touch each other?

no yes

arch not arch


Same problem different representation4
Same problem - different representation

The arch learner could have represented the

arch concept as a decision tree if we wanted

do upright blocks

support sideways block?

no yes

not arch do upright blocks

touch each other?

no yes

is the not arch

top block either

a rectangle or a wedge?

no yes

not arch arch


Other issues with learning by example
Other issues with learning by example

The learning process requires that there is

someone to say which examples are positive and

which are negative.

This approach must start with a positive example

to specialize or generalize from.

Learning by example is sensitive to the order in

which examples are presented.

Learning by example doesn’t work well with

noisy, randomly erroneous data.


Reinforcement learning
Reinforcement learning

Learning operator sequences based on reward

or punishment

Let’s say you want your robot to learn how to

vacuum the living room

iRobot Roomba 4210 Discovery Floorvac Robotic Vacuum $249.99

It’s the ideal Christmas gift!


Reinforcement learning1
Reinforcement learning

Learning operator sequences based on reward

or punishment

Let’s say you want your robot to learn how to

vacuum the living room

goto livingroom

vacuum floor

goto trashcan

empty bag

Good Robot!


Reinforcement learning2
Reinforcement learning

Learning operator sequences based on reward

or punishment

Let’s say you want your robot to learn how to

vacuum the living room

goto livingroom goto trashcan

vacuum floor vacuum floor

goto trashcan goto livingroom

empty bag empty bag

Good Robot! Bad Robot!


Reinforcement learning3
Reinforcement learning

Learning operator sequences based on reward

or punishment

Let’s say you want your robot to learn how to

vacuum the living room

goto livingroom goto trashcan

vacuum floor vacuum floor

goto trashcan goto livingroom

empty bag empty bag

Good Robot! Bad Robot!

(actually, there are no bad robots, there is only bad

behavior...and Roomba can’t really empty its own bag)


Reinforcement learning4
Reinforcement learning

Should the robot learn from success? How does

it figure out which part of the sequence of

actions is right (credit assignment problem)?

goto livingroom goto trashcan

vacuum floor vacuum floor

goto trashcan goto livingroom

empty bag empty bag

Good Robot! Bad Robot!


Reinforcement learning5
Reinforcement learning

Should the robot learn from failure? How does

it figure out which part of the sequence of

actions is wrong (blame assignment problem)?

goto livingroom goto trashcan

vacuum floor vacuum floor

goto trashcan goto livingroom

empty bag empty bag

Good Robot! Bad Robot!


Reinforcement learning6
Reinforcement learning

However you answer those questions,

the learning task again boils down to the

search for the best representation.

Here’s another type of learning that searches

for the best representation, but the representation

is very different from what you’ve seen so far.


Learning in neural networks
Learning in neural networks

The perceptron is one of the earliest neural network models, dating to the early 1960s.

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks1
Learning in neural networks

The perceptron can’t compute everything, but what it can

compute it can learn to compute.

Here’s how it works.

Inputs are 1 or 0.

Weights are reals (-n to +n).

Each input is multiplied by

its corresponding weight.

If the sum of the products

is greater than the

threshold, then the

perceptron outputs 1,

otherwise the output

is 0.

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks2
Learning in neural networks

The perceptron can’t compute everything, but what it can

compute it can learn to compute.

Here’s how it works.

The output, 1 or 0, is a

guess or prediction about

the input: does it fall into

the desired classification

(output = 1) or not

(output = 0)?

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks3
Learning in neural networks

That’s it? Big deal. No, there’s more to it....

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks4
Learning in neural networks

That’s it? Big deal. No, there’s more to it....

Say you wanted your perceptron

to classify arches.

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks5
Learning in neural networks

That’s it? Big deal. No, there’s more to it....

Say you wanted your perceptron

to classify arches.

That is, you present inputs

representing an arch, and

the output should be 1.

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks6
Learning in neural networks

That’s it? Big deal. No, there’s more to it....

Say you wanted your perceptron

to classify arches.

That is, you present inputs

representing an arch, and

the output should be 1.

You present inputs not

representing an arch,

and the output should

be 0.

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks7
Learning in neural networks

That’s it? Big deal. No, there’s more to it....

Say you wanted your perceptron

to classify arches.

That is, you present inputs

representing an arch, and

the output should be 1.

You present inputs not

representing an arch,

and the output should

be 0. If your perceptron

does that correctly for

all inputs, it knows the

concept of arch.

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks8
Learning in neural networks

But what if you present inputs for an arch, and your

perceptron outputs a 0???

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks9
Learning in neural networks

But what if you present inputs for an arch, and your

perceptron outputs a 0???

What could be done to

make it more likely that

the output will be 1 the

next time the ‘tron sees

those same inputs?

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks10
Learning in neural networks

But what if you present inputs for an arch, and your

perceptron outputs a 0???

What could be done to

make it more likely that

the output will be 1 the

next time the ‘tron sees

those same inputs?

You increase the

weights. Which ones?

How much?

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks11
Learning in neural networks

But what if you present inputs for not an arch, and your

perceptron outputs a 1?

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks12
Learning in neural networks

But what if you present inputs for not an arch, and your

perceptron outputs a 1?

What could be done to

make it more likely that

the output will be 0 the

next time the ‘tron sees

those same inputs?

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Learning in neural networks13
Learning in neural networks

But what if you present inputs for not an arch, and your

perceptron outputs a 1?

What could be done to

make it more likely that

the output will be 0 the

next time the ‘tron sees

those same inputs?

You decrease the

weights. Which ones?

How much?

weights

w1

x1

w2

w3

x2

S

x3

.

.

.

sum

threshold

xn

wn

inputs


Let s make one
Let’s make one...

First we need to come up with a representation language.

We’ll abstract away most everything to make it simple.


Let s make one1
Let’s make one...

First we need to come up with a representation language.

We’ll abstract away most everything to make it simple.

All training examples have three blocks.

A and B are upright blocks. A is always left of B.

C is a sideways block. Our language will assume those

things always to be true. The only things our language

will represent are the answers to these five questions...


Let s make one2
Let’s make one...

yes = 1, no = 0

Does A support C?

Does B support C?

Does A touch C?

Does B touch C?

Does A touch B?


Let s make one3
Let’s make one...

yes = 1, no = 0

Does A support C? 1

Does B support C? 1

Does A touch C? 1

Does B touch C? 1

Does A touch B? 0

C

A

B

arch


Let s make one4
Let’s make one...

yes = 1, no = 0

Does A support C? 1

Does B support C? 1

Does A touch C? 1

Does B touch C? 1

Does A touch B? 1

C

A

B

not arch


Let s make one5
Let’s make one...

yes = 1, no = 0

Does A support C? 0

Does B support C? 0

Does A touch C? 1

Does B touch C? 1

Does A touch B? 0

A

B

C

not arch


Let s make one6
Let’s make one...

yes = 1, no = 0

Does A support C? 0

Does B support C? 0

Does A touch C? 1

Does B touch C? 1

Does A touch B? 0

A

B

C

not arch

and so on.....



Our very simple arch learner1
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.5

x1

0

0.5

x2

S

x3

x4

0.5

0

x5

-0.5


Our very simple arch learner2
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.5

1

0

C

0.5

1

A

B

S

1

arch

1

0.5

0

0

-0.5


Our very simple arch learner3
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.5

1

0

C

0.5

1

A

B

S

1

arch

1

0.5

0

0

-0.5

sum = 1*-0.5 + 1*0 + 1*0.5 + 1*0 + 0*0.5


Our very simple arch learner4
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.5

1

0

C

0.5

1

A

B

S

1

0

arch

1

0.5

0

0

-0.5

sum = -0.5 + 0 + 0.5 + 0 + 0 = 0 which is not > threshold so output is 0


Our very simple arch learner5
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.5

1

0

C

0.5

1

A

B

S

1

0

arch

1

0.5

0

0

-0.5

sum = -0.5 + 0 + 0.5 + 0 + 0 = 0 which is not > threshold so output is 0

‘tron said no when it should say yes so increase weights where input = 1


Our very simple arch learner6
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.4

1

0.1

C

0.6

1

A

B

S

1

0

arch

1

0.5

0.1

0

-0.5

sum = -0.5 + 0 + 0.5 + 0 + 0 = 0 which is not > threshold so output is 0

so we increase the weights where the input is 1


Our very simple arch learner7
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.4

1

0.1

C

0.6

1

A

B

S

1

not arch

1

0.5

0.1

1

-0.5

now we look at the next example


Our very simple arch learner8
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.4

1

0.1

C

0.6

1

A

B

S

1

0

not arch

1

0.5

0.1

1

-0.5

sum = -0.4 + 0.1 + 0.6 + 0.1 - 0.5 = -0.1 which is not > 0.5 so output is 0


Our very simple arch learner9
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.4

1

0.1

C

0.6

1

A

B

S

1

0

not arch

1

0.5

0.1

1

-0.5

sum = -0.4 + 0.1 + 0.6 + 0.1 - 0.5 = -0.1 which is not > 0.5 so output is 0

that’s the right output for this input, so we don’t touch the weights


Our very simple arch learner10
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.4

0

0.1

0.6

0

A

B

C

S

1

not arch

1

0.5

0.1

0

-0.5

now we look at the next example


Our very simple arch learner11
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.4

0

0.1

0.6

0

A

B

C

S

1

1

not arch

1

0.5

0.1

0

-0.5

sum = 0 + 0 + 0.6 + 0.1 + 0 = 0.7 which is > 0.5 so output = 1


Our very simple arch learner12
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.4

0

0.1

0.6

0

A

B

C

S

1

1

not arch

1

0.5

0.1

0

-0.5

the ‘tron said yes when it should have said no, so we decrease

the weights where the inputs = 1


Our very simple arch learner13
Our very simple arch learner

- 0.4

0

0.1

0.5

0

A

B

C

S

1

1

not arch

1

0.5

0

0

-0.5

the ‘tron said yes when it should have said no, so we decrease

the weights where the inputs = 1


We could do this for days
We could do this for days...

...but let’s have the computer do it all for us.

First, take a look at the training examples we’ve

constructed...


Training set
Training Set

a b a b a

in class? supports supports touches touches touches

c c c c b

yes 1 1 1 1 0

no 1 1 1 1 1

no 0 0 0 0 0

no 0 0 1 1 0

no 1 0 1 0 1


Training set1
Training Set

a b a b a

in class? supports supports touches touches touches

c c c c b

no 1 0 1 0 0

no 0 1 0 1 1

no 0 1 0 1 0

no 0 0 1 0 0

no 0 0 0 1 0


Now let s look at the program
Now let’s look at the program

The program isn’t in CILOG!


What s going on
What’s going on?

The perceptron goes through the training set,

making a guess for each example and comparing

it to the actual answer.

Based on that comparison, the perceptron adjusts

weights up, down, or not at all.

For some concepts, the process converges on

a set of weights such that the perceptron guesses

correctly for every example in the training set --

that’s when the weights stop changing.


What s going on1
What’s going on?

Another way of looking at it:

Each of the possible inputs (25 in our case)

maps onto a 1 or a 0. The perceptron

is trying to find a set of weights such that it

can draw a line through the set of all inputs

and say “these inputs belong on one side of

the line (output = 1) and those belong on

the other side (output = 0)”.


What s going on2
What’s going on?

one set of weights


What s going on3
What’s going on?

another set of weights


What s going on4
What’s going on?

still another set of weights


What s going on5
What’s going on?

still another set of weights

The perceptron looks for linear separability.

That is, in the n-space defined by the inputs, it’s

looking for a line or plane that divides the inputs.


Observations
Observations

This perceptron can learn concepts involving “and”

and “or”

This perceptron can’t learn “exclusive or” (try ex3

in the Scheme code). Not linearly separble...

it won’t converge

Even a network of perceptrons arranged in a single

layer can’t compute XOR (as well as other things)


Observations1
Observations

The representation for the learned concept

(e.g., the arch concept) is just five numbers.

What does that say about the physical symbol

system hypothesis?

However, if you know which questions or relations

each individual weight is associated with, you

still have a sense of what the numbers/weights

mean.


Observations2
Observations

This is another example of intelligence as search

for the best representation.

The final set of weights that was the solution to

the arch-learning problem is not the only solution.

In fact, there are infinitely many solutions,

corresponding to the infinitely many ways to draw

the line or plane.


Beyond perceptrons
Beyond perceptrons

Perceptrons were popular in the 1960s, and some

folks thought they were the key to intelligent

machines.

But you needed multiple-layer perceptron networks

to compute some things, but to make those work

you had to build them by hand. Multiple-layer

perceptron nets don’t necessarily converge, and

when they don’t converge, they don’t learn.

Building big nets by hand was too time consuming,

so interest in perceptrons died off in the 1970s.


The return of the perceptron
The return of the perceptron

In the 1980s, people figured out that with some

changes, multiple layers of perceptron-like units

could compute anything.

First, you get rid of the threshold -- replace the

step function that generated output with a

continuous function.

Then you put hidden layers between the inputs

and the output(s).


The return of the perceptron1
The return of the perceptron

output layer

hidden layer

input layer


The return of the perceptron2
The return of the perceptron

Then for each input example you let the activation

feed forward to the outputs, compare outputs

to desired outputs, and then backpropagate the

information about the differences to inform

decisions about how to adjust the weights in the

multiple layers of network. Changes to weights

give rise to immediate changes in output, because

there’s no threshold.


The return of the perceptron3
The return of the perceptron

This generation of networks is called neural

networks, or backpropagation nets, or

connectionist networks (don’t use perceptron now)

They’re capable of computing anything computable

They learn well

They degrade gracefully

They handle noisy input well

They’re really good at modelling low-level

perceptual processing and simple learning

but...


The return of the perceptron4
The return of the perceptron

This generation of networks is called neural

networks, or backpropagation nets, or

connectionist networks (don’t use perceptron now)

They can’t explain their reasoning

Neither can we, easily...what the pattern of

weights in the hidden layers correspond to is

opaque

Not a lot of success yet in modelling higher levels

of cognitive behavior (planning, story

understanding, etc.)


The return of the perceptron5
The return of the perceptron

But this discussion of perceptrons should put

you in a position to read Chapter 11.2 and

see how those backprop networks came about.

Which leads us to the end of this term...


Things1
Things...

Good bye!

Thanks for being nice to the new guy.

We’ll see you at noon on Friday, December 10, in MCML 166 for the

final exam

Have a great holiday break, and

come visit next term.



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