Supported higher education research translation innovations
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 44

Supported Higher education: Research Translation & Innovations PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 32 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Supported Higher education: Research Translation & Innovations . Rhode Island Governors Commission on Disabilities, Providence, R.I. --- October 19, 2011.

Download Presentation

Supported Higher education: Research Translation & Innovations

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Supported higher education research translation innovations

Supported Higher education:Research Translation & Innovations

Rhode Island Governors Commission on Disabilities, Providence, R.I. --- October 19, 2011

Funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Grant # (H133A050006). Innovative Knowledge Dissemination & Utilization Project for Disability & Stakeholder Organizations


Pat deegan on recovery

Pat Deegan on Recovery

  • Recovery is a way of life, an attitude, a way of approaching life’s challenges. It is not a perfectly linear process. At times our course is erratic and we falter, slide back, regroup, start again…The need is to meet the challenge of the disability to reestablish a new and valued sense of integrity and purpose within and beyond the limits of the disability.(Deegan, 1988, p. 15).

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVlhfuKDjYE


Presenters from boston university center for psychiatric rehabilitation

Presenters…From Boston University, Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation

Joan Rapp, Rehabilitation Training Specialist

Rob Denney, Job Development Specialist


Outline

OUTLINE

  • Who are the Students?

  • Key Elements & Services

  • Challenges for Students in Higher Education

  • Systematic Review of the Research

  • BU Innovation Example

  • Higher Education Toolkit

  • Q. & A.


Who are the students

Who are the Students?

Those with major psychiatric illnesses such as psychotic disorders (schizophrenia, psychotic depression, bipolar disorder)

Those with significant mood disorders (depression, anxiety)

And other psychiatric disorders that interfere with one’s ability to perform valued roles.


Who are the students1

Who are the Students?

  • -They may come to college/university with a psychiatric illness (known or unknown)

  • -They may develop a psychiatric illness after being in school for a while

  • -Early intervention makes a huge difference in the outcomes


Definition

Definition

“Supported Education … provides supports & other assistance for persons with psychiatric disabilities for access, enrollment, retention and success in postsecondary education.”

(Collins & Mowbray, 2005)


Models services the flowers

Models & Services: The Flowers

  • Classroom Model

    students attend closed classes on campus designed for the purpose of providing supported ed.

  • On Campus (On Site) Model

    sponsored by a college and provides support for an individual rather than group

  • Mobile Support Model

    provides services through a mental health agency helping students to attend the school of their choice

  • Free Standing Model

    located at the sponsoring agency such as a rehabilitation agency, a university or other entity. (Collins & Mowbray, 2005)


An array of services

An Array of Services

  • Use staff with specialized training

  • Include career & vocational direction

  • Help with financial aid;

  • Help with coping skills for academic environment

  • On campus info re: rights and resources;

  • Mentor with authentic relationship & personal support

  • Help with course access and completion

  • Access to tutoring & other academic support;

  • Access to good (current) general support & referrals.

  • Be available when it is not convenient.


C hallenges for students

CHALLENGES FOR STUDENTS

  • Low self esteem

  • Social skills problems

  • Personal & family issues

  • Memory and concentration

  • Conflicts with faculty

    (Collins & Mowbray, 2005)

  • Compiled by the Supported Education Study Group at Boston University Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation.  Innovative Knowledge Dissemination & Utilization Project for Disability & Professional Stakeholder Organizations/ NIDRR Grant # (H133A050006)


Challenges for students

CHALLENGES FOR STUDENTS

  • Getting accommodations and supports

  • Coping with school

  • Attendance & participation

  • Specific disability issues including medication

  • General anxiety & test anxiety

  • Expectations & pressure: internal & external

  • Compiled by the Supported Education Study Group at Boston University Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation.  Innovative Knowledge Dissemination & Utilization Project for Disability & Professional Stakeholder Organizations/ NIDRR Grant # (H133A050006)


So what works

So What Works?

  • We have lots of clinical and anecdotal “evidence”…

  • We have counted the programs…

  • We have described the models and methods in a

    book and journal articles….

  • We have adapted and innovated and won some awards…

  • We have developed manuals and tool kits…

    But how well have we actually measured it so we know what works? What is essential? What do we replicate? What to avoid? Let’s discuss the research…..


Results of research analyzed

RESULTS OF RESEARCH ANALYZED

“Suggestive of Change”

  • In uncontrolled evaluations participants improved in their level of employment and educational status as a result of participation in a supported education intervention (Unger et al., 1991; Hoffman & Mastrianni, 1993; Unger et al., 2000; Unger & Pardee, 2002; Best et al., 2008; Cook & Solomon, 1993).

  • Individuals who remain engaged in supported education are able to complete courses and achieve a satisfactory grade point average (Unger et al., 2000; Unger & Pardee, 2002; Cook & Solomon, 1993; Best et al., 2008); the strength of this evidence is weak due to the poor research designs used.

  • A supported education intervention (classroom model) was more effective than a control group in improving empowerment and school efficacy (Collins et al., 1998).

Compiled by the Supported Education Study Group at Boston University Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation.   Innovative Knowledge Dissemination & Utilization Project for Disability & Professional Stakeholder Organizations/ NIDRR Grant # (H133A050006)


Results of research analyzed1

RESULTS OF RESEARCH ANALYZED

  • Satisfaction with supported education was significantly higher among those in a group supported education intervention when compared to a control group (Collins et al., 1998).

  • In terms of goal specificity, being in a supported education intervention lead to setting more specific and optimal goals (Collins et al., 1998)

  • Supported education is a viable intervention for many to meet their goals for educational advancement, personal development, and better jobs (Mowbray et al., 1996)

  • But strong research support regarding hard outcomes e.g. employment…was not there

Compiled by the Supported Education Study Group at Boston University Center for Psychiatric

Rehabilitation.   Innovative Knowledge Dissemination & Utilization Project

for Disability & Professional Stakeholder Organizations/ NIDRR Grant # (H133A050006)


Supported higher education research translation innovations

The risk


Some barriers to getting support for educational goals

SOME BARRIERS TO GETTING SUPPORT FOR EDUCATIONAL GOALS

  • Fear of disclosure

  • Lack of knowledge of what is available

  • Lack of knowledge re: Disability Support Services eligibility

  • Fear of stigma

  • Lack of real supported education interventions

  • School policies related to outreach and services: Silos of service

  • Lack of an environment that is welcoming and supportive for students with psychiatric disabilities

    (Collins & Mowbray, 2008)

)


Importance of promoting new research in supported education

IMPORTANCE OF PROMOTING NEW RESEARCH IN SUPPORTED EDUCATION

  • High unemployment rates among those with psychiatric disabilities:

    Education = Hope

  • Difficulty “graduating” from benefits to full time work without training and education;

  • Knowledge from Supported Housing and Supported Employment shows the value of the right supports in effecting outcomes

Compiled by the Supported Education Study Group at Boston University Center for Psychiatric

Rehabilitation.   Innovative Knowledge Dissemination & Utilization Project

for Disability & Professional Stakeholder Organizations/ NIDRR Grant # (H133A050006)


Value of promoting new research in supported education

VALUE OF PROMOTING NEW RESEARCH IN SUPPORTED EDUCATION

  • Limitations of the existing research in methodology;

  • Need to evaluate the current / common, individually based Supported Education interventions.

Compiled by the Supported Education Study Group at Boston University Center for Psychiatric

Rehabilitation.   Innovative Knowledge Dissemination & Utilization Project

for Disability & Professional Stakeholder Organizations/ NIDRR Grant # (H133A050006)


Where we are

Where We Are

  • Rehabilitation and Recovery?

  • A Classroom or a Computer Screen?

  • Suicide Prevention

  • Measure the Progress

  • Track the Process

  • Hope & Resilience

  • Connections you can count on

  • Authentic Relationships


Education is key factor

Education is key factor

By far the most important factor affecting participation and level of activity [in employment] is the amount of education completed. We cannot ascertain convincingly whether and to what extent educational preparedness precedes [mental] illness and the extent to which it is confounded with the seriousness and complexity of the illness. However, to the extent that educational preparation independent of illness predicts employment success, it could usefully direct effort in early treatment and in encouraging and facilitating return to school and completion of as much schooling as is feasible (David Mechanic, 2003, p.1232).


An emerging best practice

An Emerging Best Practice

  • Supported Education is an emerging best practice

  • Not there yet….

    • Sally Rogers KDU Project (NIDRR)

    • UMNDJ RCT in SEd with Temple University RRTC in Community Integration (NIDRR)

    • Fidelity Measures: University of Kansas (Diane McDermid)

    • SAMHSA Tool Kit: (Karen Unger)


A dynamic duo

A Dynamic Duo

Recovery Orientation + Supported Higher Education can = success but only if there is a deep appreciation for the lived experience of psychiatric illness and recovery.


Early intervention

Early Intervention

The concept of early intervention puts the onus on primary care and other community services to make themselves accessible, non-stigmatizing and relevant to young people, whether they are dealing with a mild and self limiting depression or a major psychosis.

~David Shierer, Joint Director of the National Development Network for Early Intervention, (NIMH for England)


Promise of early intervention

Promise of Early Intervention

Teach valuable survival skills (recognition and coping)

  • Provide for integrated treatment and support (medical, emotional, cognitive, academic & social)

  • Improve chance for success in school

  • Increase Retention & Reduce Drop Out

  • Preserve valued Roles and Scripts

  • Stop “careers” as patients


Active minds

Active Minds

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inB91LwyXxI

  • Alison Malmon-Changing the conversation about mental health (Part 1)

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMNswwfSdas

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkdwxVvxKgY


Is it worth the risk

Is it worth the risk?

You will come to a place where the streets are not

marked.

Some windows are lighted. But mostly they’re darked.

A place you could sprain both your elbow and chin!

Do you dare to stay out?

Do you dare to go in?

How much can you lose?

How much can you win?

Dr. Suess


Supported education at boston university

Supported Education atBoston University


Our history

Our History

  • Est. in 1984 with the Career Education Program that taught people from the community to choose, get and keep work in a supported educational environment.

  • Valued role of “Student” , emphasis on doing “what it takes” to help people function successfully

  • 26 years of psychiatric rehabilitation services an educational environment.

  • Service Division serves as a pilot environment for research and training.


Our foundations

Our Foundations

  • Non-negotiable values drive our service delivery: hope, choice, self-determination, and growth.

  • Theories of Change

  • Health promotion and prevention


Supported higher education research translation innovations

Our Educational Services focus:

Resiliency and Growth

  • Active, respectful, integrated services that promote healing and functional health through shared decision making with students and significant others-including University personnel and parents.

  • Rehabilitation that promotes role success as a student.

  • Case Management that supports students to live well on campus.

  • Authentic relationships


Supported higher education research translation innovations

Services We Provide:

  • College Mental Health Coaching Service

  • Campus Suicide Prevention Initiative

  • Clinical Internship Site


Student mental health

Student Mental Health

  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death in college students

  • Nationally, approximately 45% of college students report significant mental health distress

  • 67% turn to their peers FIRST.

  • Use of behavioral medicine services at BU has increased 250% in the last 5 years-more and more students coming to college with mental health diagnoses as well as those who develop mental illnesses in college.


Supported higher education research translation innovations

College Suicide Prevention at BU

  • Boston University Suicide Prevention Grant (SAMHSA)

  • *Mental Health Round Table, website development, de-siloing of campus services charged with student mental health and wellbeing

  • *Active Minds Chapter-Post Secret Project, Awards

  • *Student Support Network Training;

  • ★Webinars, Screenings, parent ENews


Supported higher education research translation innovations

BU SECRET: RAISING AWARENESS

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbX2siSMSkA


Supported higher education research translation innovations

Student Voices

  • www.bu.edu/mentalhealth


Student support network training

Student Support Network Training

  • Training students to be empathetic listeners, excellent referrers to resources on campus.

  • Marketing it as leadership training.

  • Targeting Athletes, LGBTQ, international students, minority students and Greek life

  • Specialty trainings for ROTC cadets, residential advisors, faculty and staff

  • Trained over 500 people to date

  • SSN is an evidenced based curriculum

  • Motto-”tell someone, BU listens”


Supported higher education research translation innovations

NO ORDINARY DOOR

This might look like an ordinary door, but it is the door to the B.U. Recovery Center. The Center helped open and maintain my road to recovery. The many skills I have learned and been coached on at the Recovery Center are computer knowledge, communication skills, nutrition, and most importantly self-respect and confidence. The center deals with the whole person not just the mental illness. The support I receive here has been a critical aspect in my recovery process. I am leading my life because I walked through this door.


Higher ed support toolkit

Higher Ed Support Toolkit

The Toolkit is a resource to :

Identify common difficulties experienced by students

Assess student difficulties in adjusting and managing classroom and campus life

Consider strategies and/or accommodations to help students

Identify campus resources that are available to assist students at your institution


Higher ed support toolkit1

Higher Ed Support Toolkit

The Toolkit is organized to help students access knowledge about mental illnesses and resources on their campus.

Components include:

Student Self-Assessments Forms

Getting Connected to Campus Resources

Actions and Accommodations in the Classroom

Introduction

Background and Additional Resources


Supported higher education research translation innovations

It must be borne in mind that the tragedy of life doesn’t lie in not reaching your goal. The tragedy lies in having no goal to reach.-Benjamin E. Mayes


References resources

References & Resources

  • Collins, M.E., & Mowbray, C.T. (2005). Higher education and psychiatric disabilities: National survey of campus disability services. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 75(2), 304-315.

  • Collins, M.E., & Mowbray, C.T. (2008). Students with psychiatric disabilities on campus: Examining predictors of enrollment with disability support services. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 21(2), 91-104.

  • Mowbray, C.T., Brown, K.S., Furlong-Norman, K., & Soydan, A.S. (Eds.). (2002). Supported education and psychiatric rehabilitation: Models and Methods. Linthicum, MD: International Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services.

  • Unger, L.V., Anthony, W.A., Sciarappa, K., & Rogers, E.S. (1991). A supported education program for young adults with long-term mental illness. Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 42(8), 838-842.

  • American College Health Association (2010). National College Health Assessment. Retrieved on May 13, 2011 from http://www.achancha.org/reports_ACHA-NCHAII.html


Websites

Websites

  • Rogers, E.S., Farkas, M.D., Anthony, W.A., & Kash-MacDonald, M. (2009). Systematic Review of Supported Education Literature 1989-2009. Boston, MA: Boston University Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation. Retrieved on May 13, 2011, from DRRK disability research website at http://drrk.bu.edu/research-syntheses/psychiatric-disabilities/supported-education

  • Higher Education Toolkit. Retrieved on May 13, 2011 from BU Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation website at www.bu.edu/cpr/resources/supportstudents/index.html

  • Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation Website. Reasonable Accommodations for People with Psychiatric Disabilities. Retrieved on May 13, 2011 from http://www.bu.edu/cpr/reasaccom


Contact information

Contact Information

Anne Sullivan Soydan -- Pioneer in developing supported education & Teaches at BU Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

[email protected]

E. Sally Rogers – Head of research team that conducted analyses & Director of Research

[email protected]

Dori Hutchinson –Director of Recovery Services & College Suicide Prevention Program

[email protected]

Kathleen Furlong-Norman –Editor of the Psych Rehab Journal and author of Toolkit on Supported Education

[email protected]

Joan Rapp – Coordinator of Training

[email protected]

Rob Denney – Job Placement Specialist

[email protected]


Our sponsors

Our Sponsors

  • National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: Center for Mental Health Services

  • Other private sponsors also

    Contribute to Recovery Services


  • Login