Adverbs
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Adverbs. quickly. carefully. very. well. really. slowly. What is an adverb?. An adverb is a word that modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. An adverb tells how, when, where, or to what extent. How are adverbs formed?. Most adverbs are formed by adding – ly to adjectives:

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Adverbs

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Adverbs

quickly

carefully

very

well

really

slowly


What is an adverb?

An adverb is a word that modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.

An adverb tells how, when, where, or to what extent.


How are adverbs formed?

Most adverbs are formed by adding –ly to adjectives:

carefulcarefully

quickquickly

Other adverbs are words like:

there, now, never, almost, too


The cat walked slowly.

Slowly tells HOW the cat walked.

(slowly modifies the verb walked)

The dog show begins tomorrow.

Tomorrow tells WHEN the show will begin.

(tomorrow modifies begins)


Three carpenters are working upstairs.

Upstairs tells WHERE the carpenters are working.

(upstairs modifies working)

My sand sculpture is nearly finished.

Nearly tells TO WHAT EXTENT the sculpture is finished.

(nearly modifies finished)


Let’s find adverbs!

Find the adverb and the word it modifies.

Bob plays the saxophone well.

He had a concert yesterday.

A

Well tells HOW Bob plays.

A

Yesterday tells WHEN the concert was.


Let’s try more!

Find the adverb and the word it modifies:

The two cats often play.

They quickly run up and down the stairs.

The cats are very active.

A

Often tells WHEN the cats play.

A

Quickly tells HOW the cats run.

A

Very tells HOW active the cats are.


Comparing with Adverbs

Adverbs can be used to compare two actions.

Use the comparative form of the adverb.

Mary runs faster than Leslie.

Adverbs can be used to compare 3 or more actions.

Use the superlative form of the adverb.

Of the 3 light bulbs, the 150-watt burns brightest.


To make the comparative form of some adverbs, add –er. To make the superlative, add –est.

latelaterlatest

highhigherhighest

earlyearlierearliest

Superlative

Comparative


For most adverbs that end in –ly:Form the comparative by adding moreForm the superlative by adding most.

brightlymore brightly most brightly

bravemore bravely most bravely

carefullymore carefully most carefully

Comparative

Superlative


Some adverbs change forms completely:

wellbetterbest

badlyworseworst

muchmoremost

littlelessleast


Write the correct form of the adverb in parenthesis.

Theresa pitches (fast) than Sylvia.

Of all the girls on the team, Maria runs (quick).

Jenny likes the Blue Jays (well) than the Yankees.

faster

quickest

better


Adjective or Adverb?

Remember:

ADJECTIVES

tell how many, what kind, or which one about nouns and pronouns.

ADVERBS

tell how, when, where, or to what extent about verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.


Choose the correct word for the following sentences. Tell whether you chose an adjective or an adverb.

The actors knew their parts (perfect, perfectly).

The actors seemed (calm, calmly) before the play began.

The speeches were very (well, good).

ADVERB

ADJECTIVE

ADJECTIVE


Choose the correct word for the following sentences. Tell whether you chose an adjective or an adverb.

The mountains are (real, really) gigantic.

The storm (quick, quickly) ended.

The rain fell (lightly, light) on the roof.

ADVERB

ADVERB

ADVERB


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