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Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services U.S. Department of Education. Before IDEA. One in five children with disabilities was educated. More than 1 million children with disabilities were excluded from the education system.

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Office of special education and rehabilitative services u s department of education l.jpg

Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative ServicesU.S. Department of Education


Before idea l.jpg

Before IDEA

  • One in five children with disabilities was educated.

  • More than 1 million children with disabilities were excluded from the education system.

  • Another 3.5 million children with disabilities did not receive appropriate services.


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Impact of IDEA

  • Today, 6.5 million children with disabilities are served.

  • 96% of students with disabilities are now served in regular school buildings.

  • Services for children birth to three have increased more than 6 fold in the past 25 years.


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Impact of IDEA

  • High School Graduation Rates: Increased from 51.9% in 1994 to 57.4% in 1999

  • Increased College Enrollment: In 1978, under 3% of college freshman reported they had a disability, while in 1998, the figure was 9%

  • Parent Involvement: More than 85% of parents are involved in planning their child’s services and making educational decisions.


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Challenges

  • Increase high school graduation rates.

  • Raise post-secondary enrollment and completion rates.

  • Expand opportunities for competitive, meaningful, integrated employment.


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The IDEA Amendments of 1997:Focus on Accountability for Results

  • State Performance Goals and Indicators Consistent with Goals and Standards for All Children

  • Access to, Participation in, and Progress in the General Curriculum

  • Inclusion in State and District Assessments

  • Alternate Assessments


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The No Child Left Behind Act

  • On January 8, 2002, President Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)

    • Most sweeping reform of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act since its enactment in 1965

    • Redefines the federal role in K-12 education

    • Requires accountability for all children, including student groups based on poverty, race and ethnicity, disability and limited English proficiency (LEP)

    • Will help close the achievement gap between disadvantaged, disabled and minority students and their peers


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The No Child Left Behind Act

  • Based on Four Principles

    • Stronger accountability for results

    • Increased flexibility and local control

    • Expanded options for parents

    • Focusing on what works


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The No Child Left Behind ActStronger Accountability for Results

  • States must implement statewide accountability systems covering all public schools and students based on:

    • Challenging State standards in reading and math (science in 2005-2006)

    • Annual testing for all students in grades 3-8 and at least once in grades 10-12

    • Annual statewide progress objectives ensuring that all groups of students reach proficiency within 12 years


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The No Child Left Behind ActStronger Accountability for Results

  • Assessments must provide accommodations for students with disabilities as defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

  • School districts and schools that fail to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) toward statewide proficiency goals will, over time, be subject to improvement, corrective action, and restructuring measures

  • Schools that meet or exceed AYP will be eligible for State Academic Achievement Awards

  • Assessments must be accessible and valid with the widest possible range of students.


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The No Child Left Behind ActStronger Accountability for Results

  • State and School District Report Cards

    • Student academic achievement on statewide tests disaggregated by subgroup

    • Comparison of students at basic, proficient and advanced levels of achievement

    • High school graduation rates (drop outs)

    • Number and names of schools identified for improvement

    • Professional qualifications of teachers

    • Percentage of students not tested


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The No Child Left Behind ActStronger Accountability for Results

  • To receive subgrants under NCLB, the local education agency (LEA) plan must be coordinated with other federal programs, including IDEA

  • Must coordinate and integrate services under Title I with other education services such as services for students with disabilities to

    • Increase program effectiveness

    • Reduce duplication

    • Reduce fragmentation of instructional program


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The No Child Left Behind ActStronger Accountability for Results

  • Alternate Assessments

  • Alternate assessment must yield results for the grade in which the student is enrolled.

  • NPRM issued by Secretary Paige is currently out for comment.


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The No Child Left Behind ActStronger Accountability for Results

  • Alternate Assessments

  • IEP team determines if child cannot participate in all or part of the State assessments, even with accommodations.

  • Even with accommodations, the State must provide for one or more alternate assessments for a child with a disability.


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The No Child Left Behind ActIncreased Flexibility & Local Control

  • Provides unprecedented new flexibility for states and local school districts in use of federal education funds under four major state grant programs

    • Teacher Quality

    • Educational Technology

    • Safe and Drug-Free Schools

    • NCLB Title I

  • Up to 50% of federal non-Title I funds can be targeted to programs with positive impact on students served, including students with disabilities


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The No Child Left Behind ActExpanded Options for Parents

  • May transfer student enrolled in failing school to a better public school, including public charter school

  • Supplemental services for students attending Title I schools that fail to meet state standards for at least 3 of 4 years

    • Tutoring

    • After school services

    • Summer school from provider selected by parents from state-approved list

  • Services for children with disabilities must be consistent with goals in child’s individualized education program (IEP)


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The No Child Left Behind ActExpanded Options for Parents

  • Supplemental Services for Students with Disabilities

    • Must be consistent with the student’s IEP

    • Are not considered a part of the IEP

    • Parental consent required before developing the supplemental services agreement

    • Some providers must be able to serve students with disabilities.


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The No Child Left Behind ActFocusing on What Works

  • Emphasis on Proven Teaching Methods

    • Reading First program: Research-based reading instruction in grades K-3 to children who

      • Have reading difficulties

      • Are at-risk of referral to special education based on reading difficulties

      • Have been evaluated but not identified under IDEA

      • Are served under IDEA based on severe learning disability related to reading

      • Are deficient in essential components or reading skills

      • Are limited English proficient


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The No Child Left Behind ActFocusing on What Works

  • Emphasis on Proven Teaching Methods

  • Reading First Program (K-3)

    • $6 billion over next several years

    • $900 million in 2002

    • 6-year formula grants to States

    • Competitive grants to LEAs to

      • Administer screening and diagnostic tests

      • Provide professional development


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The No Child Left Behind ActFocusing on What Works

  • Emphasis on Teacher Quality

    • Train teachers to teach and address needs of students with different learning styles, particularly students with disabilities or with LEP

    • Coordinate professional development activities under other federal, state and local programs

    • Train early childhood educators to meet educational needs of child, including children with disabilities or with LEP


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The No Child Left Behind ActFocusing on What Works

  • Improving Teacher Quality State Grants Program ($4 Billion in 2002)

    • Using scientifically based practices to prepare, train and recruit high-quality teachers

    • Core academic subjects taught by high qualified teachers by 2006 school year

    • Must demonstrate annual progress toward goal


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The No Child Left Behind ActFocusing on What Works

  • Highly Qualified Teachers and Special Education

    • Special education teachers teaching core academic subjects must meet “highly qualified” requirements.

    • All special education personnel must meet IDEA personnel-standards requirements.

    • States have flexibility in how standards are met.


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The No Child Left Behind ActFocusing on What Works

  • Higher Qualifications for Paraprofessionals

    • Paraprofessionals hired after 1/8/2002 to work in Title I funded programs must have

      • Completed 2 years of study at an IHE

      • Obtained associate’s or higher degree OR

      • Met rigorous standard of quality

      • Demonstrated ability to instruct in reading, writing and mathematics (through State or local academic assessment)

    • Paraprofessionals hired before 1/8/2002 to work in Title I funded programs must meet requirements in 4 years.


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Administration’s Principles for Reauthorizing the IDEA

  • Stronger Accountability for Results

  • Simplify Paperwork for States and Communities and Increase Flexibility for All

  • Doing What Works

  • Increase Choices and Meaningful Involvement for Parents


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Improving Education Results for Children with Disabilities Act

  • H.R. 1350, Education Reform Subcommittee, U.S. House Committee on Education & the Workforce

  • Calls for reforms to :

  • Strengthen accountability and improve education results for children with disabilities

  • Reduce the IDEA paperwork burden for teachers

  • Provide greater flexibility for local school districts to improve early intervention strategies


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Improving Education Results for Children with Disabilities Act

  • Reduce overidentification/misidentification of nondisabled children, including minority youth

  • Restore trust between parents and school districts

  • Support general education and special education teachers


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Improving Education Results for Children with Disabilities Act

  • Education reforms to:

  • Encourage innovative approaches to parental involvement and parental choice

  • Reform special education finance and funding

  • Ensure school safety


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