Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all
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Celebrating Examples of Good Practice in Achievement for All. ‘ Communicating a Better Future’ Laura Mclean AfA Advisor – Language and Communication Specialist – Islington PCT Kathleen Mackenzie AfA Lead Teacher – Haverstock School Rhona MacDonald

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Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

Celebrating Examples of Good Practice inAchievement for All

‘Communicating a Better Future’

Laura Mclean

AfA Advisor – Language and Communication Specialist – Islington PCT

Kathleen Mackenzie

AfA Lead Teacher – Haverstock School

Rhona MacDonald

AfA Lead Teacher – Hampstead School


We will be discussing

We will be discussing..

  • Communicating a Better Future:

    What have we been doing?

  • Lesson example and video clip; Haverstock

  • Lesson example and video clip; Hampstead


Communicating a better future whole school capacity building project

Communicating a better futureWhole school capacity building project

Initially 18 month projects in 2 secondary schools working with staff across the whole school to develop their capacity and skills in effectively supporting:

Students with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) and Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND)

AND

All students to develop their language and communication skills


Communicating a better future whole school capacity building project1

Communicating a better futureWhole school capacity building project

The projects are based on the evidence of the award winning ‘Listen Ear’ initiativein 3 Islington secondary schools

Achievement for All will now aim to develop this model of working in all secondary schools in Camden


Why whole school working

Why ‘whole school’ working?

Adequate and effective spoken language and communication skills are vital to every young person’s:

  • Educational achievement

  • Ability to behave, interact and socialise effectively both in and out of school

  • Emotional wellbeing

  • Opportunities for future employment

  • Ability to achieve the Every Child Matters outcomes


Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

Why ‘whole school’ working?

Many recommendations for students with SLCN are suitable for developing all young people’s communication skills

Focussing on embedding speaking and listening activities and strategies into every day teaching practice will support students with SLCN/SEND to make better progress and generalise their skills.

High numbers of students with language and communication needs have not previously been identified as having SLCN. Whole school working supports all students

Empowering school staff to support students with SLCN effectively and efficiently will reduce the need for highly specialised input.


Achievement for all

Achievement for All

Support students to generalise their learning from SEND interventions, as subject teachers encouraged to use consistent strategies and techniques

Support staff to baseline speaking and listening interventions and assess progress

  • Supporting and developing communication of students with SEND can support achievement of wider outcomes:

  • Attendance

  • Behaviour

  • Positive relationships

  • Participation

Support communication between school , pupils and parents


Examples of strategies promoted to support and teach listening and learning

Examples of Strategies promoted toSupport and Teach Listening and Learning

Use

positive ways of

gaining attention

Model good

listening skills

Use consistent

rules, reminders,

rewards and sanctions

Explicitly teach what

‘active listening’

means

Make the students

aware of what &

how they are learning

Use consistent, clear,

positive instructions


Examples of strategies promoted to support and teach listening and learning1

Examples of Strategies promoted toSupport and Teach Listening and Learning

Deliver engaging and

accessible lessons

for all levels of ability

Use visual

support

Increase structured

talking time for students

Reduce

teacher talk

Explicitly teach

vocabulary


Enabling quality first inclusive teaching

Enabling Quality First Inclusive Teaching

Quality first teaching/Active listening and active learning strategies to be promoted and modelled to teachers throughout the school by;

  • Working with specific classes modelling strategies

  • Lesson study and coaching models

  • Learning walks

  • Observation checklists and feedback

  • Insets / CPD sessions


Video clip example of good practice

Video clip – Example of good practice

Haverstock School

Lesson = Year 7 Integrated Learning Scheme

Number of Students in the class = 26 (19 in session)

Number of students on the SEN register =

Number of students with EAL =

Number of Gifted and Talented students =

Jointly planned lesson and team taught


Strategies used in the lesson

Strategies used in the lesson

  • Visual support

    • Visual schedule at the beginning of the lesson (with consistent symbols)

    • Instructions on power point with words and pictures

    • Gesture

    • Worksheet for them to complete while observing presentations

  • Positive, clear language and explicit instructions

  • Engaging and accessible

    • variety of activities

    • Less teacher talk

  • Personalised activity

    • Students worked on map to own ability (differentiated), and in reference to themselves

  • Skills development

    • Active Listening skills

    • Presentation skills; non verbal language


Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

Haverstock

video clip


Video clip example of good practice1

Video clip – Example of good practice

Hampstead School

Lesson = Year 7 Humanities

Number of students in the class =

Number of students on the SEN register =

Number of students with EAL =

Number of Gifted and Talented students =


Strategies used in the lesson1

Strategies used in the lesson

  • Visual support

    • Visual schedule at the beginning of the lesson

    • Instructions on power point with words and pictures

    • Gesture and Actions for poem

  • Positive, clear language and explicit instructions

  • Modelling and promoting good listening

    • Reminding students of ‘listening rules’ and waiting for students to follow rules

    • Not talking over students

    • Range of positive ways to gain attention

  • Engaging and accessible

    • All student participation

    • Explicit discussion about what happens if students find it difficult

    • Specific praise for students who find task more difficult

  • Skills development

    • Active Listening and memory skills

    • Presentation and voice skills


Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

Hampstead

video clip


Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

Haverstock video clip:

Lesson plan

Power point


Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

Lesson Plan

Date 12/02/10 Period 5 Teaching Group 7O Subject ILS Staff MKE

Context:

Pupils have been following an Integrated Learning Scheme of work focusing on developing the skills necessary for the 21st century learner. This lesson builds upon work carried out in conjunction with the Speech and Language Therapist with the intention of developing and extending active listening skills. This unit of work is entitled ‘Me and My Community’ whereby pupils will explore their place in their local community extending their geographical and historical skills of enquiry.

Learning Objectives:

  • To be able to use presentation skills in order to talk about ‘my place’.

  • To reflect upon the skills developed over the course of the year.

    Lesson Outcomes:


Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

Differentiation Strategies

Plan for less able/those on SEN code of practice/EMAS students

Targeted questioning use random selection method at the beginning of lesson.

Images/visual schedule to support teacher exposition

Less able seated next to more able to access peer support

Vocabulary book to assist with acquisition of new keywords.

Talk partnerships to assist with confidence in verbalizing and processing ideas before writing.

Plan for more able/those on G&T register

Targeted questioning building on higher order thinking skills

More able students to be used to model answers or to stimulate discussion.

Resources: PPT – ‘What is my place’; ‘How to show that I am actively listening’ w/s; A3 maps of ‘My Place’; Peer assessment w/s

Students targeted: H, J, S, L, M

Students targeted:

I, K, S


What is my place

What is my place?

  • In this lesson you will be learning through:

  • ‘Camden market’ game

  • 2. Listening to information

  • 3. Presentations of ‘my place’

  • and feedback

  • 4. Sharing our ideas about

  • what we have learnt

Keywords:

My Place

Active listening

Presentation skills

Objectives:

To use our presentation skills to talk about ‘my place’

To reflect on the skills we have learnt


How to show i am actively listening

How to show I am actively listening


Camden market listening and memory game

‘Camden Market’ Listening and Memory Game

The 1st person says:

‘I went to Camden Market and I bought a … book’

I went to Camden Market and I bought a book


Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

The 2nd person says:

‘I went to Camden Market and I bought a book and … some boots’

I went to Camden Market and I bought a book and some boots


Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

The 3rd person says:

‘I went to Camden Market and I bought a book, some boots and … a t-shirt

I went to Camden Market and I bought a book, some boots and a

t-shirt


Checking understanding

Checking Understanding

  • If you haven’t heard what somebody said, you may need to ask them to say it again.

    (‘Sorry, I didn’t hear. What did you say?’)

  • If you can’t remember all the items that were said, you may need to ask people to repeat.

  • If there are too many words to remember, we can start a new list!

  • If someone has said a word you don’t understand, you can ask them to explain the word

    (‘What does that mean?’)

I didn’t hear that

I don’t know that word


How to show i am actively listening1

How to show I am actively listening


Using maps to describe places

Using maps to describe places


Presenting your place

Presenting ‘your place’

  • Good eye contact: look at the audience!

  • Good body language and posture

  • Clear speaking voice

    Make sure the audience can understand you!

    Speak loudly enough (but don’t shout!)

    Speak at a good speed (not too fast / too slow)

    Make your voice sound interesting (your tone of voice go up and down)

    Explain the key features of your place.

    Remember the examples from last lesson.


Giving feedback to the presenters

Giving feedback to the presenters

  • Use the worksheet to help you feedback to your peer what they were great at, and what they could practice more.

  • Tick the red, amber or green boxes for each skill.


Plenary two stars and a wish

Plenary – Two stars and a wish

An area where I have worked well upon…

A second area I have worked well upon…

An area I need to work on…


Celebrating examples of good practice in achievement for all

Hampstead video clip:

Power point


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