Unit 7 my world
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Unit 7: My World. Conversation (pg. 30). Comprehension Questions: Who is Janet Hoskins? How long was Janet their neighbour? Where did Patty go for lunch? What did the waiter give Patty? Who gave Peter his scarf?. their old neighbor for five years La Trattoria Peter’s scarf

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Unit 7: My World

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Unit 7 my world

Unit 7: My World


Conversation pg 30

Conversation (pg. 30)

Comprehension Questions:

Who is Janet Hoskins?

How long was Janet their neighbour?

Where did Patty go for lunch?

What did the waiter give Patty?

Who gave Peter his scarf?

their old neighbor

for five years

La Trattoria

Peter’s scarf

Patty’s mother


Grammar relative clauses

Grammar: Relative Clauses

  • Relative clauses combine two pieces of information into one sentence.

  • We use them to say exactly which people, things and places we are talking about.

  • Relative clauses are introduced by either relative pronouns or relative adverbs.

    • who, which, and that are relative pronouns.

    • where is a relative adverb.

    • who is for people, which is for things, and where is for places.


Grammar relative clauses1

Grammar: Relative Clauses


Grammar relative clauses2

Grammar: Relative Clauses

  • There are two types of relative clauses: subject and object.

  • In subject relative clauses, the relative pronoun is the subject of the verb in the clause.

    Ann is an interesting woman whosits across from me.

    (The relative pronoun ‘who’ refers to woman, and it is the subject of the verb sits.)

  • In object relative clauses, the relative pronoun is the object of the verb in the clause.

    Charlie is someonethat I trust.

    (The relative pronoun ‘that’ is the object of the verb trust, and I is the subject of the verb trust.)


Grammar relative clauses3

Grammar: Relative Clauses

Subject Relative Clause

In this case, the relative pronoun must be followed by a verb.

Brad Pitt is an actorwhois married to Angelina Jolie.

Samsung is a large companywhichmakes many electronic devices such as HD Televisions.

Object Relative Clause

In this case, the relative pronoun must be followed by either a noun or a pronoun.

Angelina Jolie is an actress who*Brad Pitt is married to.

HD Televisions are some of the many electronic devices which*Samsung makes.

*NOTE: In object relative clauses, the relative pronoun

can be omitted.


Grammar relative clauses4

Grammar: Relative Clauses

  • We use where (relative adverb) instead of a relative pronoun plus a preposition.

  • This often makes the sentence easier to understand.

    • This is the shopin which I bought my bike.

    • This is the shopwhere I bought my bike.

    • Seoul is the cityin which I live.

    • Seoul is the citywhere I live.


Vocabulary definitions

Vocabulary: definitions

  • adaptable:

    • It takes an adaptable person to live and work in a new culture. They must be open to change.

  • adventurous:

    • Mike is very adventurous. He loves to do extreme sports.

  • ambitious:

    • Lucy runs 15km everyday to train for a marathon. She’s an ambitious person.

  • decisive:

    • The decisive army general made very quick and smart decisions during the battle.

  • handy:

    • My new phone is so handy. I can check my email, check the weather, and take photos with it.


Vocabulary definitions1

Vocabulary: definitions

  • inquisitive:

    • My students ask a lot of questions. They are really inquisitive.

  • lively:

    • The new coffee shop around the corner is quite lively. It’s always busy and it has live music every night.

  • picturesque:

    • The palaces around Seoul are so beautiful. They are very picturesque.

  • reckless:

    • That man drives so fast and dangerously. He’s a reckless driver.

  • tricky:

    • That question was tricky. It was difficult to answer.


Strategy tag questions

Strategy: Tag Questions

  • Tag questions are an interactive way of involving the other speaker in a conversation.

  • Speakers use tag questions either to check information or to ask someone to agree to or confirm what is said.

  • The meaning changes depending on the intonation.

  • Examples:

    • That new movie was excellent, wasn’t it?

    • You didn’t study for the exam, did you?


Strategy tag questions1

Strategy: Tag Questions

  • 1st Form:

  • affirmative statement+negative tag

  • I’m a great singer,aren’t I?

  • It’s cold today,isn’t it?

  • She went partying last night,didn’t she?

  • That was a boring class,wasn’t it?

  • He has been looking ill lately,hasn’t he?


Strategy tag questions2

Strategy: Tag Questions

  • 2nd Form:

  • negative statement+positive tag

  • I’m not a great singer,am I?

  • It’s not cold today,is it?

  • She didn’t go partying last night,did she?

  • That wasn’t a boring class,was it?

  • He hasn’t been looking too good lately,has he?


Strategy tag questions3

Strategy: Tag Questions

  • Agreeing to apositive statementwith anegative tag:

  • She plays the piano, doesn’t she?

    • Yes, she does. (= I confirm that: She does play the piano.)

  • You do like Chinese food,don’t you?

    • Yes, I do. (= I confirm that: I do like Chinese food.)


Strategy tag questions4

Strategy: Tag Questions

  • Agreeing to anegative statement with apositive tag:

  • She doesn’t play the piano,does she?

    • No, she doesn’t. (= I confirm that: She doesn’t play the piano.)

  • You don’t like Chinese food,do you?

    • No, I don’t. (= I confirm that: I don’t like Chinese food.)


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