COLLABORATIVE MODELS FOR WORKING WITH
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COLLABORATIVE MODELS FOR WORKING WITH DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT IN CALGARY PRESENTATION TO 2011 PAN CANADIAN CONGRESS OF THE CANADIAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ASSOCIATION October 28, 2011. Presentation Overview. HomeFront Safe Communities Innovation Fund – Alberta Justice

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Collaborative models for working with domestic violence and sexual assault in calgary presentation to 2011 pan cana

COLLABORATIVE MODELS FOR WORKING WITH DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT IN CALGARY PRESENTATION TO 2011 PAN CANADIAN CONGRESS OF THE CANADIAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ASSOCIATIONOctober 28, 2011


Presentation overview

Presentation Overview

  • HomeFront

  • Safe Communities Innovation Fund – Alberta Justice

  • Session Format

  • Specific Questions


Collaborative models for working with domestic violence and sexual assault in calgary

COLLABORATIVE MODELS FOR WORKING WITH DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT IN CALGARY

  • CONNECT

  • Domestic Conflict Response Team

  • High Risk Management Initiative


Responding to a need

Responding to a Need

  • There are many barriers for individuals who access services related to domestic violence and sexual assault

  • Barriers related to language, culture, race, ethnicity, disability, gender, age, sexual orientation

  • We identified 11 different systems, 15 services and 24 social issues that present along-side domestic violence and sexual assault

  • People have the most difficulty when they try to access service within the “big systems”

  • Failed attempts to access service result in “giving up”


Responding to a need1

Responding to a Need

  • Individuals don’t experience domestic violence and sexual assault in isolation

  • Women and children who stay in shelters are believed to constitute only 10% of those who are abused at any given time (Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics June 2007).

  • Fewer than 3 in 10 victims of spousal violence in Canada report domestic abuse to the police (2004 General Social Survey).

  • 8% of sexual assault victims report to police (Statistics Canada, 2004)


Purpose why connect

Purpose – Why Connect?

  • To increase access to essential services for any individual affected by any type of domestic violence and/or sexual assault

  • This includes victims, aggressors, family, friends, support people and professionals

  • Creating a welcoming gateway to service – no wrong door!

  • An opportunity for a new “low threshold entry point”


What is connect

What is Connect?

  • 24 Hour Support and Information Line

  • In-person Support (weekdays at Sheldon Chumir Health Centre in downtown Calgary)

  • 24 Hour Sexual Assault Response Team

  • Sexual Assault Follow-up Clinic

  • Connect Police Liaison

  • Domestic Violence Education and Awareness


Our biggest challenges

Our Biggest Challenges

  • Communication and outreach to this invisible majority

  • Collaboration with limited co-location

  • Building an integrated service response to both domestic violence and sexual assault

  • Collaborative human resource management

  • Perceived risks or threats associated with collaboration

  • Resources required for sustainability


Spin offs and unexpected outcomes

Spin-offs and Unexpected Outcomes

  • Domestic Violence Response Team

  • Partners Guide to Collaborative Management

  • Collaborative Model of Legal Services Delivery

  • Third Option for Victims of Sexual Assault

  • Analysis of Prosecution Files for Sexual Assault

  • New Provincial Urgent Care Policy


Domestic conflict response team

Domestic Conflict Response Team


Dcrt commitment

DCRT -Commitment

Police Chief Rick Hanson:

“This program is not only about saving people, it’s about breaking the cycle, and I think we’ve done that for a lot of families. But we also know that we’ve only scratched the surface. There’s more work to be done.”


Dcrt structure

DCRT Structure

  • Phase l DCRT CPS District 5 in the northeast of Calgary

  • Partners with the local CFSA office

  • Phase l - two police officer/HomeFront Caseworker teams co-located

  • A CFSA Intake Worker screens cases teams may/may not work together

  • The Phase llTeam is a CFSA driven model

  • Phase llDCR Team meet twice weekly to triage all domestic conflict files

  • Phase llTeam -two CFSA Intake Workers, a Team Leader, Assessor, Closer to Home Outreach Worker

  • CPS is available to consult for criminal/risk information when required.

  • An informal partnership with a keen officer in District 8 has supported the DCRT Outreach Worker

  • Phase lll proposes the best of both worlds


Mission vision a clear path

Mission & Vision – A Clear Path

Mission:

Vision:

As a result of our integrated, collaborative and proactive intervention, the major systems experience a measurable reduction in chronic calls for service. We have built internal and external capacity to respond to domestic violence in a seamless and timely manner.

Together, the Calgary and Area Child and Family Services, the Calgary Police Service and HomeFront have created the Domestic Conflict Response Team – a seamless integrated response interrupting patterns of abuse and violence in families through quick and compassionate action.


Challenges

Challenges

  • Large systems with entrenched ways of responding to DV

  • Differing views and practices within the participant sub-cultures

  • Existing ways of operating have created stress and heavy workloads – limiting adaptability


Victory is possible when we are

Victory is possible when we are…

  • Willing to look beyond our own perspective (We vs. I)

  • Recognizing that we are not the best/only organization to meet every community need

  • Coming together for the greater good to create the greatest good

  • asking them “How we can help?”, instead of telling people how we are going to help them

  • Believing that anything is possible

  • Having an unyielding commitment to our overall mission and vision, and then giving people the room to make it happen

  • Evaluating our impacts and learning from our mistakes


The future beyond the pilot

The Future Beyond the Pilot


High risk management initiative hrmi

High Risk Management Initiative (HRMI)

CCJA Conference

October 28th, 2011


Project overview

Project Overview

  • PURPOSE

  • HOW IS THE COLLABORATIVE ORGANIZED?

  • WHO ARE THE PARTNERS?

Working with specialized agency partners to increase community safety by reducing the perpetration of high-risk domestic violence offences


Project purpose

PROJECT PURPOSE

  • *APPROXIMATELY ¼ OF HOMICIDES IN CALGARY HAVE A DOMESTIC VIOLENCE COMPONENT

  • ALL PARTNERS ARE WORKING WITH IDENTIFIED RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE POTENTIAL FOR LETHALITY

  • PROACTIVE MONITORING OF THESE RELATIONSHIPS REQUIRES EFFICIENT AND TIMELY INFORMATION SHARING

  • RISK FACTORS CAN BE BETTER IDENTIFIED WITH COLABORATION

  • TO IDENTIFY AND CASE MANAGE THE HIGHEST RISK FOR LETHALITY RELATIONSHIPS IN CALGARY

  • A NEED IDENTIFIED


    Project purpose1

    PROJECT PURPOSE

    To address the unique needs in a high risk relationship and create:

    • MEASURABLE STABILIZATION

    • PROACTIVE OFFENDER MANAGEMENT / ACCOUNTABILITY

    • VICTIM SAFETY

    To reduce/prevent chronic and severe incidents of domestic violence (HOMICIDE PREVENTION)


    How is the collaborative organized

    HOW IS THE COLLABORATIVE ORGANIZED?

    • HRMI IS COMPRISED OF:

      • STEERING COMMITTEE

      • OPERATIONS COMMITTEE

      • CASE MANAGEMENT TEAM

    • BRINGING TOGETHER PARTNER ADMINISTRATION AND FRONTLINE WORKERS


    Who are the partners

    WHO ARE THE PARTNERS?

    • AHS – Mental Health and Addictions (Adult Addictions and Forensic Assessment Outpatient Services)

    • Alberta Justice – Crown Prosecutor’s Office

    • ASG Community Corrections – Calgary Central Probation

    • Calgary and Area Child and Family Services Authority

    • Calgary Counselling Centre

    • CPS Domestic Conflict Unit – H.O.M.E Team

    • HomeFront

    • YWCA Sheriff King Home


    Collaborative models for working with domestic violence and sexual assault in calgary presentation to 2011 pan cana

    HRMI ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

    Steering Committee

    Committee providing expert support with representatives from Treatment, Mental Health, CFSA, Police, Legal, Victim Support, Housing & Employment, and Corrections. Conducts quarterly meetings to develop policy, system advocacy, resourcing and consultation. (See attached staffing table.)

    Operations/Oversight Committee

    Committee comprised of representatives from Police, Probation, Treatment, Mental Health, and Victim. Conducts monthly meetings to identifying, screening and accepting/declining proposed HRMI files. Conducts monthly meetings to identifying, screen/assess and accepting/decline proposed HRMI files

    Case Management Team

    Team consisting of service providers, treatment providers and support services who will create a risk reduction and rehabilitation plan for the offender. Conducts weekly meetings to perform file reviews, ensure client stability, safety and accountability. (See attached staffing table.)

    • Probation

    • 1 Probation Officers with specialized training in high-risk domestic violence cases.

    • Monitor and contain high risk offenders

    • Create well structured service plans that address the needs of the offender and build protective factors for victims

    • Mental Health Consultant

    • .

    • Breach Response

    • 2 person Calgary Police Service Domestic Conflict Unit Team

    • Provide surveillance, enforcement and critical risk and domestic violence expertise to the initiative.

    • Victim Supports

    • HomeFront Court Casework and Partner Support Programs (PSP)

    • Prioritize/increase contact with victims

    • Provide ongoing risk assessment, safety planning, referrals to shelters, community crisis counselling, income supports, legal supports and housing alternatives

    Schedule 3: Staffing Table/Org Chart (Part 2 of 2)


    Challenges with collaboration

    CHALLENGES WITH COLLABORATION

    • Partners involved adhere to conflicting information sharing legislation i.e. FOIP, PIPPA, and the HIA

    • Resolving differences in opinion as to what cases are suitable for HRMI i.e. high-risk, high-conflict, difficult to manage


    Key benefits to partnering

    KEY BENEFITS TO PARTNERING

    • Risk Factors are better identified with Collaboration “Getting the full picture”

    • Efficient and Timely Information Sharing = Proactive Case Management

      • Proactive Victim Supports

      • Proactive Offender Supports

      • Proactive Enforcement Capabilities for Both Probation and Police


    Importance of evaluation

    Importance of Evaluation

    • Monitor program implementation

    • Monitor target population demographics

    • Survey collaborative partners

    • Feedback from clients

    • Client outcomes & project results

    • Social Return on Investment (SROI)


    Key findings connect

    Key Findings - CONNECT

    • Collaboration takes time

    • Looking for system level outcomes

    • Mandatory Training and Screening for DV implemented in Urgent Care & Public Health

    • Third Option for sexual assault victims – first pilot in Alberta


    Key findings dcrt

    Key Findings - DCRT

    • 79% reduced recidivism for chronic cases

    • Front line police use DCRT for consults

    • EPO training increased confidence/tools for front line police

    • Reduced EPO Court time to ZERO Court time


    Key findings dcrt1

    Key Findings - DCRT

    • CFSA – new screening procedures result in better assessment of child’s risk

    • CFSA – procedural changes across Calgary

    • Developmental evaluation of two models has resulted in ideas for the final model


    Key findings hrmi

    Key Findings - HRMI

    • Partners find communication and open referral process vital to family safety

    • Circle of Security being implemented

    • Two Offender Profiles

      • 75% respond to treatment interventions

      • 25% respond to increased enforcement

    • 75% had no further incidents of violence


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