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Sub-brand to go here. Comenius: Future School Leadership What is leadership?. Raphael Wilkins. Leading Whom? Leading Where? Leading How? Leading What?. If ‘leadership’ requires followers, and If ‘education’ helps people to make up their own minds, then

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Comenius future school leadership what is leadership

Comenius: Future School LeadershipWhat is leadership?

Raphael Wilkins


Leading whom leading where leading how leading what
Leading Whom? Leading Where? Leading How? Leading What?

  • If ‘leadership’ requires followers, and

  • If ‘education’ helps people to make up their own minds, then

  • Is ‘Educational Leadership’ a contradiction in terms?


Through what activities do leaders lead
Through what activities do ‘leaders’ ‘lead’?

  • Influencing policy-making

  • Contributing to governance

  • Management

  • Professional practice

  • Administration

  • Symbolic actions and personal example

  • Communication: oral/written, external/internal, formal/informal, conscious/unconscious



Educational leaders
Educational Leaders

Must be primarily concerned with leading learning.

Leaders of learning are involved in planning, doing, monitoring, analysing, evaluating and improving the quality of teaching and learning… and then

taking effective action

  • 5


Introduction to the uk national standards for headteachers i
Introduction to the (UK) National Standards for Headteachers (i)

  • Published in 2004 by Department for Education and Skills

  • ref: DfES/0083/2004

  • ISBN: 1-84478-314-6

  • Can be downloaded from: www.nationalcollege.org.uk


Introduction to the uk national standards for headteachers ii
Introduction to the (UK) National Standards for Headteachers (ii)

  • The Standards are set out in six key areas which represent the role of the headteacher:

  • Shaping the future

  • Leading learning and teaching

  • Developing self and working with others

  • Managing the organisation

  • Securing accountability

  • Strengthening community


Introduction to the uk national standards for headteachers iii
Introduction to the (UK) National Standards for Headteachers (iii)

  • For each of the six key areas, the Standard sets out:

  • Explanation of the Standard

  • Knowledge: knows about:

  • Professional Qualities: is committed to:

  • Professional Qualities: is able to:

  • Actions (and expected outcomes)


Leading learning uk national standards iv dfes 0083 2004 extract
Leading Learning: UK National Standards (iv) (iii)DfES/0083/2004 (extract)

  • Is committed to:

  • Raising standards for all in the pursuit of excellence

  • Continuing learning of all members of the school community

  • Entitlement of all pupils to effective teaching and learning

  • Choice and flexibility in learning to meet the personalised learning needs of every child


Leading learning uk national standards v dfes 0083 2004 extract continued
Leading Learning: UK National Standards (v) (iii)DfES/0083/2004 (extract continued)

  • Is able to:

  • Demonstrate personal enthusiasm for and commitment to the learning process

  • Demonstrate the principles and practice of effective teaching and learning

  • Access, analyse and interpret information

  • Initiate and support research and debate about effective learning

  • Develop relevant strategies for performance improvement

  • Acknowledge excellence and challenge poor performance


A fundamental question
A fundamental question (iii)

  • Should people working in schools try to do so in ways which are consistent with educational beliefs and values?


Some purposes of education
Some purposes of education (iii)

  • Passing on culture from one generation to the next

  • Making society more open to new ideas and knowledge

  • Personal and social improvement

  • Economic development

  • Social justice

  • Which purposes have greater priority in your context over the next five years?

  • For any one purpose, how will you know it is being achieved?



Two agendas for education
Two agendas for education of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • Socialisation and training - transmitting customs and culture and producing a workforce suited to the current known economy

  • Educative empowerment - enabling each child to develop to the full extent of their aptitudes

  • Both agendas are necessary but they represent contrasting mindsets and convey contrasting messages to the next generation.


The core agenda for education
The core agenda for education of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • To enable each child to achieve their full potential


The core agenda for education1
The core agenda for education of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • To enable each child to achieve their full potential

  • How? Where?

  • ‘Potential’ as defined by whom?

  • Within what contextual limitations?


  • Dimensions of educational innovation of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • Aims and purposes: changing aspirations

  • The nature of interpersonal relationships: from fear to student voice

  • ‘Technologies’ of teaching and learning, including ICT

  • Curriculum development

  • Changes to buildings and organisations


  • Dimensions of educational innovation of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • (+COSTS)

  • Aims and purposes: changing aspirations Free

  • The nature of interpersonal relationships: Free

  • from fear to student voice

  • ‘Technologies’ of teaching and learning, including ICT High

  • Curriculum development High

  • Changes to buildings and organisations High


Leading by affecting people s thinking
Leading by affecting people’s thinking of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • Collect data – analyse it

  • What data would persuade people that your route of travel is needed?

  • Present the information logically to change people’s thinking

  • Changed thinking can lead to changed behaviour


Leading by affecting people s feelings
Leading by affecting people’s feelings of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • Create surprising, compelling and if possible visual experiences

  • Get ‘real people’, including students, to tell their stories

  • Show real examples of ‘where it is already working’

  • These experiences change how people feel about a situation

  • A change in feelings can lead to a significant change in behaviour


Leading change means creating for others
Leading change means creating for others: of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • A sense of desirable destination

  • A sense of motivation to reach that destination

  • A sense of navigable steps and milestones

  • A sense of ability and confidence to do what is needed

  • A sense of permission to work differently

  • A sense of support from the organisation

  • A sense that success will be recognised

  • 21

  • 21


Professional and managerial approaches
Professional and Managerial approaches of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • Strategies for improving teacher quality often make different assumptions about whether teachers should be treated as ‘professionals’ or as ‘operatives’.

  • This can send confusing messages about the level of responsibility teachers should take for the quality of their work.


A managerial view of teaching
A ‘Managerial’ view of teaching of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • Teachers are technical operatives

  • They conduct lessons which should be designed by experts

  • They need strong line management to ensure they conform

  • Professional development (CPD) is the training needed to correct faults and deficiencies

  • Creativity and innovation by teachers should be discouraged


A professional view of teaching
A ‘Professional’ view of teaching of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • Teachers are self-motivated professionals

  • Their main job is to design lessons which will meet their students’ needs, using their experience and judgement

  • Teachers work best within a supportive professional peer group

  • Professional development (CPD) is an integral part of being a teacher

  • Creativity and innovation by teachers are encouraged


Reasons for embracing professionalism
Reasons for embracing professionalism of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • People are the main resource used in the work

  • The work requires a high level of knowledge and expertise

  • The work is inter-personal in nature

  • The ‘service users’ are children

  • The work requires many judgements to be made

  • The work cannot be supervised in detail


How does professional learning happen
How does professional learning happen? of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • Listening to and observing experienced colleagues

  • Professional reading including through internet

  • Individual reflective practice and action research

  • Working collaboratively in teams

  • Receiving informed and constructive feedback

  • Job rotation, enrichment, secondments

  • In-house meetings, briefings and training events

  • Professional learning communities

  • School-based training events with external inputs

  • External training through distance learning

  • Attending external courses


How does professional learning happen costs
How does professional learning happen? of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’(+ Costs)

  • Listening to and observing experienced colleagues Free/low

  • Professional reading including through internet Free/low

  • Individual reflective practice and action research Free/low

  • Working collaboratively in teams Free/low

  • Receiving informed and constructive feedback Free

  • Job rotation, enrichment, secondments Free/low

  • In-house meetings, briefings and training events Free/low

  • Professional learning communities Free/low

  • School-based training events with external inputs Medium

  • External training through distance learning Medium

  • Attending external courses High


Infrastructural support for professional learning
Infrastructural support for professional learning of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • Senior leaders reinforce importance of CPD at all times

  • Developmental system of performance management

  • Coaching culture

  • Encouragement of action research

  • Staff reference library

  • Discussions about educational matters

  • Staff observe each other’s work

  • Internal dissemination of new learning and development

  • School invests in the staff development skills of its senior leaders

  • Leaders understand how to increase the impact of CPD

  • School has an effective and clearly written CPD policy


The cost of quality
The cost of quality? of people, as well as in the making of educational and social exclusions.’

  • The factors that account for most of the differences in school effectiveness are:

  • The quality of classroom teaching

  • The quality of school leadership

  • The quality of relationships with students

  • Assuming common salary scales apply, which is more expensive:

  • A good teacher or a poor teacher?

  • An interesting lesson or a boring lesson?

  • An excellent headteacher or a mediocre headteacher?

  • Positive relations with students or negative relations?


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