To my dear and loving husband l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 17

To My Dear and Loving Husband PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 168 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

To My Dear and Loving Husband. By: Anne Bradstreet. If ever two were one , then surely we. If ever man were loved by wife , then thee. If ever wife was happy in a man ,. Compare with me , ye women, if you can . I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold,.

Download Presentation

To My Dear and Loving Husband

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


To my dear and loving husband l.jpg

To My Dear and Loving Husband

By: Anne Bradstreet


Slide2 l.jpg

If ever two were one,

then surely we.


Slide3 l.jpg

If ever man were loved by wife,

then thee.


Slide4 l.jpg

If ever wife

was happy in a man,


Slide5 l.jpg

Compare with me,

ye women,

if you can.


Slide6 l.jpg

I prize thy love

more than whole mines of gold,


Slide7 l.jpg

Or all the riches

that the East doth hold.


Slide8 l.jpg

My love is such that rivers cannot quench.


Slide9 l.jpg

Nor ought

but love from thee give recompense.


Slide10 l.jpg

Thy love is such

I can no way repay;


Slide11 l.jpg

The heavens reward thee manifold,

I pray.


Slide12 l.jpg

Then while we live,

in love let’s so persever,


Slide13 l.jpg

That when

we live no more,

we may live ever.


Test yourself l.jpg

Test Yourself


Steps to memorization l.jpg

Steps to memorization

  • Pick a poem that you like. Tips.

  • Break it down by line. Think about each line and make sure that you understand the meaning and pronunciation of each word.

  • Write it. Say it aloud. Listen to it.

  • Think about what you are saying. Where should emphasis be? Help your listener understand what you know and appreciate about this poem.

  • Make a Power Point for review and practice.

    • Write one line/section per slide

    • Record (Insert/Movies & Sounds/Record Sound)

    • Adjust animation so your words come in on a click (Slide Show/Custom Animation)

    • Play Slide Show to test yourself. Use your sound cues for hints.

    • Make a slide of just your sound cues to test yourself.

    • View in Slide Sorter to see all the words or have someone else check you.

  • Learn it line by line. Assign yourself two or three lines to learn a night.

  • Close your eyes and say the words. See them and hear them.

  • Practice in front of someone else. Where did you stumble? Why? Practice just that part over and over again.

  • Practice every day.

  • Read the tips again.


Slide16 l.jpg

Quiz

  • Write out as much as you can right now.

  • What is your favorite line? Can you explain why?

  • Why did you pick this poem?

  • What challenges/d you in learning this poem?


Slide17 l.jpg

Quiz

  • Write out as much as you can right now.

    If ever two were one, then surely we.

    If ever man were loved by wife, then thee.

    If ever woman was happy in a man,

    Compare with me, ye women, if you can.

    I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold.

    Or all the riches that the East doth hold.

    My love is such that rivers cannot quench.

    Nor ought by thy love give recompense.

    Thy love is such that I can no way repay

    The heavens reward thee manifold, I pray.

    Then while we live, in love let’s persever

    That when we live no more, we may live ever.

  • What is your favorite line? Can you explain why?

    “My love is such that rivers cannot quench.” It’s a simple and powerful sentence. The image is strong and it occurs in the middle of the poem between some longer phrases.

  • Why did you pick this poem?

    It’s one of my favorites because it is simple and sweet but not sappy or corny. Her explanations of her love for her husband are original and powerful. She also communicates her religious beliefs without stereotype, prejudice, or righteousness. The form is also simple, but not corny. She writes in rhyming couplets that are never forced and there is some organization in the order that the ideas are presented (this helps me memorize it). First, she has three “if…then” statements. Then she talks about the power of love. Finally, she cannot repay the love given so she ends with her belief that God could and because they love they can live together in eternal life.

  • What challenges/d you in learning this poem?

    I kept saying “persevere,” but looked it up online and “per-se-ver” is a word. This is dated and sounds awkward to me, but rhymes with the final line, which is obviously the poet’s intention because she rhymes every other line. I hope that I remember to say it the old-fashioned way.


  • Login