Justness to justice
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JUSTNESS TO JUSTICE. Gilbert Brenson-Lazan. If you have food in the refrigerator, clothes on your back, a roof overhead and a place to sleep . you are richer than 75% of this world. If you have money in the bank, in your wallet, and spare change in a dish some place .

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JUSTNESS TO JUSTICE

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Justness to justice

JUSTNESS TO JUSTICE

Gilbert Brenson-Lazan


Justness to justice

If you have food in the refrigerator, clothes on your back, a roof overhead and a place to sleep ...

you are richer than 75% of this world.


Justness to justice

If you have money in the bank, in your wallet, and spare change in a dish some place ...

you are among the top 8% of the world's wealthy.


Justness to justice

If you woke up this morning with more health than illness ...

you are more fortunate than the million who will not survive this week.


Justness to justice

If you have never experienced the danger of battle, the loneliness of imprisonment, the agony of torture, or the pangs of starvation...

you are ahead of 500 million people in the world.


Justness to justice

If you can attend a church meeting without fear of harassment, arrest, torture, or death ...

you are more blessed than three billion people in the world.


Justness to justice

If your parents are still alive and still married ...

you are very rare.


Justness to justice

If you hold up your head with a smile on your face and are truly thankful ...

you are part of a small minority because the majority can, but do not.


Justness to justice

If you hold someone's hand, hug them or even touch them on the shoulder ...

you are one of the very few that are willing to offer a healing touch.


Justness to justice

And if you could read this message…

you are more blessed than over two billion people in the world that cannot read at all.


Justness to justice

  • So… what is justice?


And the difference between

And the difference between…

  • Justice…and justness?

  • Peace…and peacemaking?

  • Tolerance…and valuing diversity?

  • Love…and showing your love?

  • Non-Violence…and not being violent.


Six strategies

SIX STRATEGIES

  • Linguistic Empowerment

  • Reaffirming

  • Conflict De-escalation

  • Contextualized Participation

  • Community Consensus Building

  • Building Group Resilience


Linguistic empowerment

LINGUISTIC EMPOWERMENT

Verbal language is the way in which we can organize and modify our internal reality (perception ) and our interpersonal reality.

  • “Reality is linguistically constructed, maintained and modified.” Heinz Von Forster:


The secret

THE SECRET:

  • Listen in such a way that others want to talk to you.

  • Talk in such a way that others want to listen to you.


Linguistic empowerment1

LINGUISTIC EMPOWERMENT

The use of linguistic structures which facilitate:

greater co-creation or agreement upon the meaning(s) of what is being said, and…

the number and quality of the perceptual and behavioral options being created by that meaning, for both ourselves and others.


4c s of empowerment

4C’s OF EMPOWERMENT

  • Correspondence

  • Capacity

  • Clarity

  • Coherence


Correspondence identified responsibilities

CORRESPONDENCE: Identified Responsibilities

  • CORRESPONDENCE : There is a correct attribution of authorship and/or responsibility for each thought, feeling and action that has been mentioned. Without it, the protagonists do not assume their due responsibility, and the individuals or the collective groups stop developing their power optimally.

  • Not Empowered:July’s goal has been met.

  • Empowered:The salesmen met the goal for July.

  • N:Maria makes me feel guilty when I arrive late.

  • E:I feel guilty when Maria complains about my being late.


Capacity recognized options

CAPACITY: Recognized Options

  • CAPACITY: There is a tacit or explicit mention of the most important perceptual and behavioral options—either potential or real. Any linguistic limitation of real options or capabilities of the individual or the group hinders the effectiveness of the system.

  • N:I have to see John at 3:00.

  • E: I promised to talk to John at 3:00.

  • N:I cannot talk to you now.

  • E: I'd rather not commit myself in talking to you now. Can we do it this afternoon after lunch?


Clarity agreed meanings

CLARITY: Agreed Meanings

  • CLARITY: There is explanation, agreement or co-creation of the significance of what is being said. Each person “knows” what the words mean; the difficulty emerges when the knowledge is different.

  • N:Can you give me that watchamacallit over there?

  • E:Can you hand me the tape recorder that is in the left drawer, please?

  • N:She is always showing a lack of respect!

  • E:Several customers have complained about how she responds to questions.


Coherence consistent messages

COHERENCE: Consistent Messages

  • COHERENCE: There is semiotic agreement (between the verbal and the non-verbal channels), a syntactic consistency (between the parts of the sentence), and contextual consistency (within which the sentence is pronounced).

  • N:I want to sell more but competition is tough.

  • E: I want to sell more in spite of the tough competition.

  • N:Don’t you think it would be better to do this tomorrow?

  • E: I think it is better to do this tomorrow. What do you think?


Internal empowerment

INTERNAL EMPOWERMENT

  • It is the process of restructuring one own linguistic production, in order to eliminate non- empowered structures.


Dialogical empowerment

DIALOGICAL EMPOWERMENT

It is the process of facilitating the empowerment of another person and the relationship with her/him person through the use of linguistic structures which invites him/her to empower him/herself:

  • Tracking

  • Paraphrasing


Justness to justice

  • Consists in asking specific questions that allow that that the other person clarifies what he or she means by what is being said, until both parts reach an agreement on the meaning and on all real options.


Tracking examples

TRACKING EXAMPLES:

  • Pedro made me feel awful.

  • Specifically, what does Pedro do that you feel awful about?

  • People are mediocre by nature.

  • What lead you to that conclusion?

  • Nobody helps in this office.

  • Specifically, how would you like us to help you?

  • The interview went well.

  • What results did you get?


Justness to justice

  • Consists in repeating, in your own words and in a more empowered way, what you understood to be the meaning of what was said and then ask for confirmation.


Paraphrasing examples

PARAPHRASING EXAMPLES:

  • Pedro got me drunk the other night.

  • You mean you drank too much when you went out with Juan?

  • I can’t understand that book.

  • You mean that you find the book too technical?

  • The decision was already made.

  • The manager had already decided who to hire, is that right?

  • I have to stay with my little sister.

  • So you made a commitment to staying with your little sister this afternoon, is that it?


Another benefit of paraphrasing

ANOTHER BENEFIT OF PARAPHRASING

  • Paraphrasing has the additional advantage of facilitating that the other person feels listened to and taken seriously.


Evolution and resolution of conflict

EVOLUTION AND RESOLUTION OF CONFLICT


How does conflict arise

HOW DOES CONFLICT ARISE?

A conflict arises when one person tries to satisfy a specific need or desire with a strategy que interferes with another person´s strategy to satisfy his/her specific need.


Conflict formation

CONFLICT FORMATION

Strategy 2

Strategy 1

Person 1

Person 2

Goal 2

Goal 1


The 3p conflict triangle

THE 3P CONFLICT TRIANGLE

PROCESS

PERSONS

PROBLEM


Process of conflict escalation

PROCESS OF CONFLICT ESCALATION

  • Rigidity

  • Persuasion

  • Manipulation

    Responds best to conciliation.

INFLEXIBILITY

DISCOUNTING

AGGRESSION

  • Polarization (us vs them)

  • Insults

  • Threats

  • Responds best to conciliation or mediation.

  • Verbal Aggression

  • Physical Aggressión

  • Destructive Behaviors

  • Responds best to mediation or binding arbitration

Adaptation Gnass-Brenson of F.Glasl - 1998


Slogans by stage

SLOGANS BY STAGE:

  • Perceptual Rigidity: “I know I´m right."

  • Persuasion: “I have to convince them that I am right."

  • Manipulation: “I´ll do whatever is necessary to show them that they are wrong."

  • Polarization: “Those of us that know I am right are now united."

  • Discounting and Insulting: “It isn´t even worth talking to them."

  • Veiled Threats: “We have to do something about those that are not with us."

  • Verbal Aggression: "That person is a #%$*&!"

  • Physical Aggression: “Take this!"

  • Destructive Behaviors: “I may lose but I´ll take some with me."


How to approach a conflict

HOW TO APPROACH A CONFLICT:

  • INTERVENE IN THE “CAUSE”.

  • INTERVENE IN THE CULTURE

  • INTERVENE IN THE STRUCTURE.

  • INTERVENE IN THE PROCESS.


Justness to justice

Stages of Conciliation

Resolution

7) Commit

toImplementation

5) Create

Options

6) Agree upon

a

Strategy

4) Identify

Needs

3)

Understand

Reactions

2) Clarify

Perceptions

1) Create

Context

Conflict

Forward

Backwards

Brenson, ICA-Canada - 2002


Stages of conciliation

STAGES OF CONCILIATION

  • CREATE THE CONTEXT: Create the space (environment) and the interpersonal processes (rapport) that are needed to stimulate dialogical communication.

  • CLARIFY THE PERCEPTIONS: Each participant shares his/her observations (sensorial data), perceptions (personal significance of the data) and other relevant information related to the conflict, without making judgements.

  • UNDERSTAND THE REACTIONS: Each participant also shares her/his feelings and other reactions to the conflict, without blaming the other(s) involved.

  • IDENTIFY THE NEEDS: Finally, each participant identifies what are his/her root needs or interests that requiered the strategies, positions or postures employed in the conflict.

  • CREATE OPTIONS: Together the participants explore various possible options that would facilitate that each satisfies her/his needs without interfering in the satisfaction of the needs of the others.

  • AGREE UPON A STRATEGY: The participants then evaluate each strategy developed and agree to try one of them.

  • COMMIT TO ITS IMPLEMENTATION: Finally, the participants agree to a strategic implementation plan as a trial, with specific commitments to mutual actions and joint monitoring of results.


Dynamics of intervention

P1

P1

F

F

P2

P2

Finally, the facilitator gets out of the dialogue and remains alert to the possib ility of again intervening if the communication again becomes dysfunctional.

Then, the facilitator establishes a modeling of dialogical communication between the participants through paraphrasing.

DYNAMICS OF INTERVENTION

P1

F

P2

The facilitator interrupts any dysfunctional communication between the participants and communicates directly where necessary with each one, in order to get through the first stages.


Building group resilience global facilitators service corps gfsc iaf conference europe october 2004

Building Group ResilienceGlobal Facilitators Service Corps(GFSC)IAF Conference - Europe October 2004


Group social resilience building

Group & Social Resilience Building

History:

  • Physics: elasticity, buoyancy, the ability to quickly return, often stronger, to the original shape

  • Biology (Darwin): survival of the most resilient

  • Children

  • Adults

  • Families

  • Groups


Justness to justice

Personal Resilience (Stefan Vanistendael, 1994): the combination of:

  • The innate human capacity to face adversity and resist destruction

  • The willingness to evolve and develop oneself in spite of adverse conditions

  • The use of the adversity itself to learn and transform oneself


Justness to justice

Social Group Resilience:

  • The ability to face internal or external crisis and not only effectively resolve it but also learn from it, be strengthened by it and emerge transformed by it, both individually and as a group

    (Brenson-Lazan, 2003)


Factors in resilience development

Factors in Resilience Development:

  • Personal Development

  • Interpersonal Development

  • Vision

  • Strategic Thinking

Personal Development: the group stimulates & reinforces a responsible autonomy in each member:

  • The sense of personal identity and role

  • Perceptual and behavioural flexibility

  • Self-awareness and self-correction

  • Self-esteem and self-confidence


Justness to justice

Interpersonal Development: the group creates, stimulates and reinforces spaces and processes for effective interpersonal synergy:

  • The value of diversity

  • Empathic listening

  • Participation and dialogue

  • Mutual affection, forgiveness and self-help

Vision: the group together develops it’s direction:

  • A set of shared values

  • A promising vision of the future

  • The integration of individual goals and aspirations with those of the group


Justness to justice

Strategic Thinking: the group develops a mission and the necessary competencies to achieve it:

  • Sets realistic goals

  • Elaborates strategies to achieve them

  • Promotes group reflection, introspection and self-correction

  • Constructively and creatively resolve it’s challenges, problems and conflicts

  • Asks for help when it is needed

  • Monitor, measure and evaluate results


Justness to justice

GFSC: our values, vision and mission

GFSC believes that people and communities are capable of self-determination and that facilitation is an effective catalyst to build, rebuild and sustain self-reliant communities. By sharing our knowledge, experience and caring we enable communities, and institutions that serve them, to identify and achieve goals.

By linking people, processes and resources worldwide, GFSC unleashes the collaborative potential of communities to create solutions to their challenges.


Justness to justice

TRANSFORMATION

Hidden Zone

Hidden Zone

Productivity

y Self-Esteem

PERSONAL

TRANSITION

TRAUMATIC EVENT

PSEUDOTRANSION

PROCESS OF

COMMITMENT

TO CHANGE

association

action

assimilation

acceptance

denial

confusion

frustration

resistence

INITIAL

REACTIONS

GRIEVING

somatization

hyperemotivity

aggressiveness

interpersonal conflicts

decision de try

new options

T

i

m

e

decision to

abandon the process

Actual State Unfreezing Transition Refreezing Desired State


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