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Global Movement of Disability and Development relation to CRPD and CBR/CBID. Akiie Ninomiya Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD). Disability and Development. Micro level. Macro level. DNA. Cell. Organ. PWD. Family. Village. Society. Medical Rehabilitation.

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global movement of disability and development relation to crpd and cbr cbid

Global Movement of Disability and Development relation to CRPD and CBR/CBID

AkiieNinomiya

Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD)

slide2

Disability and Development

Micro level

Macro level

DNA

Cell

Organ

PWD

Family

Village

Society

Medical Rehabilitation

APCD’s Approach

Educational / Vocational Rehabilitation

persons with disabilities as resources
Persons with disabilities as resources

APCD’s view on PWDs

1.Social resources

2.Empowered person

3.Member of society

4.Citizen

5.Policy advocator

6.Social development

promoter

Traditional view on PWDs

1.Sin (karma)

2.Vulnerable person

3.Person in need of help

4.Patient

5.Student

6.Receipient of welfare

7.Receipient of charity

environmental model
Environmental Model

PWD

PWD

PWD

PWD

Rehabilitation

Empowerment

PWD

PWD

Barrier-free

Community

Community

slide5

A Barrier-Free Society for All

Removal of barriers

Physical

environment

Information and Communication

Regulations and Systems

Prejudices and

Attitudes

||

Empowered PWDs

in the community

Agents of change

slide6

APCD’s focus in CBR

EMPOWERMENT

ENVIRONMENT

PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

COMMUNICATION

SOCIAL MOBILIZATION

INFORMATION & COMMUNICATION

POLITICAL PARTICIPATION

REGULATIONS & SYSTEMS

SELF-HELP GROUPS

DISABLED PEOPLE’S ORGANIZATIONS

PREDUJICES & ATTITUDES

mdgs and disability
MDGS AND DISABILITY
  • “MDG 1: Eradicate Hunger and Poverty
  • MDG 2: Achieve Primary Universal Education
  • MDG 3: Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women
slide8

MDG 4: Reduce Child Mortality

  • MDG 5: Improve Maternal Health
  • MDG 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases
  • MDG 7: EnsureEnvironmentalSustainability
slide9

MDG 8: Develop a Global Partnership for Development

  • “A partnership implies inclusion, which means everyone.”
  • Disabled people are typically among the very poorest;
  • Disabled people are typically among the very poorest;
slide10

Disability cuts across all societies and groups.

  • Community-based Rehabilitation (CBR) is a strategy to promote inclusive development for persons with disabilities.
cbr and inclusive development
CBR AND INCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT
  • To ensure that persons with disabilities are able to maximize their physical and mental abilities, to access regular services and
  • opportunities, and to become active contributors to the community and society at large.
slide12

To activate communities to promote and protect the human rights of persons with disabilities through changes within the community, for example, by removing barriers to participation.

slide13

The scope of CBR activities broadened from medical and education activities to addressing poverty and livelihoods;

  • Formation of self-help groups, self-help organizations of persons with disabilities, family associations;
  • Awareness raising.
slide14

partnerships and networking; and inclusion of marginalized groups like women with disabilities, persons with intellectual or multiple disabilities, psychosocial disabilities or those living with HIV/AIDS.

slide15

CBR practice has changed from a medical orientated, often single sector (e.g., health or education), service delivery approach, to a comprehensive, multi-sectoral, rights-based one

slide16

Focusingon creation of inclusive societies where persons with disabilities have access to all development benefits like everyone in their

communities

cbr and crpd
CBR and CRPD
  • Respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy, including the freedom to make one’s own choices, and independence of persons.
  • Non-discrimination Full and active participation and inclusion in society
slide18

Equality of opportunity

  • Accessibility
  • Equality between men and women
  • Respect for the evolving capacities of children with disabilities and respect for the rights of children to preserve their identities.
slide19

CBR is a multisectoral, bottom-up strategy which can ensure that the Convention makes a difference at the community level.

  • While the Convention provides the philosophy and policy, CBR is a practical strategy for implementation.
slide20

CBR activities are designed to meet the basic needs of persons with disabilities, reduce poverty, and enable access to health, education, livelihood and social opportunities. all these activities fulfill the aims of the Convention.

slide21

Article 19: States Parties to the present Convention recognize the

equal right of all persons with disabilities to live in the community,

with choices equal to others, and shall take effective and appropriate

measures to facilitate full enjoyment by persons with disabilities of

this right and their full inclusion and participation in the community

slide22

(b) Support participation and inclusion in the community and

all aspects of society, are voluntary, and are available to persons

with disabilities as close as possible to their own communities,

including in rural areas.

slide23

Article 25 (c) Provide these health services as close as possible to

people’s own communities, including in rural areas.

slide24

Article 26. States Parties shall organize, strengthen and extend

comprehensive habilitation and rehabilitation services and

programmes, particularly in the areas of health, employment,

education and social services, in such a way that these services and

programmes:

slide26

1.Reduce poverty and enhance work and employment prospects

2.Promote participation in political processes and in decision making

3.Enhance access to the physical environment, public transportation,

knowledge, information and communication

slide27

4.Strengthen social protection

5.Expand early intervention and education of children with

disabilities

6.Ensure gender equality and women’s empowerment

7.Ensure disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction and management

slide28

8.Improve the reliability and comparability of disability data

9.Accelerate the ratification and implementation of the Convention

on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and harmonization of

national legislation with the Convention

10.Advance sub-regional, regional and interregional cooperation.

mongolia
Mongolia
  • around 2.9 million people. It is also the world\'s second-largest landlocked country after Kazakhstan.
urban poverty
Urban Poverty
  • Ulan Bator, the capitalis home to about 45% of the population.
aging population
Aging Population
  • According to recent UNESCAP reports, about 5 to 10 per cent of those aged over 65 show signs of Alzheimer’s disease in the Asia-Pacific region and an estimated 33 million people will be living with dementia in this region by 2030.
health care
Health Care

1. Persons with disabilities, who make up 15% of the population, face widespread barriers in accessing health services and therefore experience greater unmet health care needs, worse health outcomes, and higher rates of poverty than persons without disabilities.

slide36

2. The disadvantage in relation to poorer health experienced

by persons with disabilities has wider impacts on families,

communities, and health systems

slide37

3. Improved access to health for persons with disabilities is not

only a human right but also a critical enabling factor to achieving

aspirations including education, employment, caring for and

participating in family, community and public life.

slide38

4. Good health will lead to better overall socio-economic outcomes

for persons with disabilities and achievement of broader global

development goals.

education
Education
  • Inclusive Education.
livelihood
Livelihood
  • Income
  • Disability Inclusive Business
  • Consumer
  • Employee
  • Entrepreneurial Business
social
Social
  • Social protection
  • Relationship with Family and friends
  • Culture and Art
  • Recreation, Leisure and sports
  • Justice
sustainability
Sustainability
  • Local fund-raising within developing countries to facilitate sustainability has been tried by implementers in the disability an development sector.
  • Not give a fish, but teach how to catch the fish. (Capacity Development)
slide43

A key principle for sustainability is to have the local government

take over and sustain the programmes that are initiated with

external support. It is important for external donor agencies to fit

their own plans and ideas into the local governments’ plans and

budgets.

slide44

Self-help groups and associations of persons with disabilities, who are the primary stakeholders for CBR, can contribute to sustainability.

Linking these groups with other successful community based organizations such as women’s federations, can also be of help.

slide45

Collaboration between local government, parents, and CBR

staff has been reported to be successful in continuing some CBR

activities; while including persons with disabilities into local

level development councils can ensure that disability issues are

included in development planning

ad