Methodology for course mapping
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methodology for course mapping. demonstrated in three cases. The problem. To compare, translate and exchange Educations modules (≈courses) between different education systems. This requires the modules to be described in such a way that it is possible for other partners to understand them

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Methodology for course mapping

methodology for course mapping

  • demonstrated in three cases


The problem

The problem

  • To compare, translate and exchange Educations modules (≈courses) between different education systems.

  • This requires the modules to be described in such a way that it is possible for other partners to understand them

  • It requires a common understanding of the basic elements that form an education module and their meaning

  • In the next step the modules are integrated into an education system in order to enable merits transfers for the students


General idea from this

General idea: From this

Univ H

Univ A

Univ G

Univ B

Univ F

Univ E

Univ C

Univ D


To this

ECTS

TO THIS

Univ H

Univ A

Univ G

Univ B

Univ F

Univ E

Univ C

Univ D


Theoretical background

Theoretical background

  • Metrology


Why metrology

Why metrology?

  • It is all about measure certain aspects of a course.

  • These measurements are to be compared

  • It is not sufficient to compare only the figures, also the measurement scale and the measurement method must be investigated.

  • Börje Langefors formulated 1966 a theory on information systems, where the systems was considered as a set of entities with relations between them, manifested in certain state variables.


State variable

System-name

Added by Kristo Ivanov 1972

State variable

Varible

Attribute-name

Value

Time

Uncertainty of value


More is needed

System-name

More is needed

Entity

Attribute-name

Value

Measurement unit

Measurement procedure

Time

Uncertainty of value

Weltanschauung


Course attributes ex

  • Course name

  • Size, Volume

  • Admittance criteria

  • description

  • Period

  • Goal

  • Contact person

  • Content

  • Level in the system

  • Evaluation

  • Literature

  • Host department

  • Teacher(s)

  • Schedule

  • Course code

  • Subject

course attributes-ex


Example course vxu

Attribute-name

Volume

Value

5

Measurement unit

POINTS

Measurement procedure

Student work weeks

Time

Spring 06

Uncertainty

0%

Weltanschauung

Student works

Example: Course (VXU)


Same example bologna

Attribute-name

Volume

Value

7,5

Measurement unit

ECTS

Measurement procedure

Workload, complexity

Time

Spring 06

Uncertainty

0%

Weltanschauung

Learning units

Same example (Bologna)


Comments

Comments

  • Since the Weltanschauung is not the same, the meaning of the attribute “Volume” is not the same.

  • Thus there is a problem with translation between them.

  • How can we ensure a correct translation?

  • We must simply describe our courses in another world view, in terms of another system.

  • Sometimes this means we can’t describe parts of our courses and we have to introduce foreign concepts and viewpoints.


Course and related concepts

Course and related concepts


Course

Course

  • Every university have templates for describing courses

  • There are certain information which must be present such as admittance requirements, time period, name of the course, contact person and some more or less – usually more – cryptical description.

  • Here we shall concentrate on four types of attributes.


Unit of analysis

UNIT OF ANALYSIS

COURSE

CONTENT

GOAL

WORKLOAD

CONTEXT


Content

CONTENT

  • THERE ARE SEVERAL CURRICULUM AROUND:

    • The ACM curriculum

    • The IFIP-curriculum

  • There are, to our knowledge, no common European curriculum within informatics

  • In any case there must be a description of the course content referring to some common ontology


Methodology for course mapping

Goal

  • Describes what the participants should learn about the content.

  • Describes also what type of knowledge they should demonstrate

  • Ontology: Bloom’s taxonomy and Dublin descriptors


Bloom s taxonomy

1. Knowledge

Describe, define, present

2. Understanding

Proof, explain, motivate, interpret, translate

3. Application

Use, do, measure, observe, perform

4. Analysis

Divide, group, identify, compare, classify, investigate

5. Synthesis

Conclusions, rules, organise, produce, connections

6. Value

Judge, make decisions, scrutinise, critique

Bloom’s taxonomy

Used for classifying learning goals.

For every course at least two of them should be relevant.


Dublin descriptors

Dublin descriptors

  • Five dimensions which are used for judging the level of a specific course/learning unit. Nothing to do with examination!

    • Knowledge and understanding

    • Application of knowledge and understanding

    • Ability to do judgements

    • Ability to communicate

    • Study skill


Dublin descriptors applied

Dublin descriptors applied

  • in combination with Bloom


Knowledge and understanding

Knowledge and understanding

  • Bachelor

    • Supported by advanced books and with some perspectives from the research area

  • Master

    • Providing a base for originality in use or development of ideas, often related to research


Application of knowledge

Application of knowledge

  • Bachelor

    • Ability to provide and support arguments

  • Master

    • Ability to solve problems in new and broader (pluralistic, cross-scientific) contexts


Ability to judge

Ability to judge

  • Bachelor

    • Collect and interpret relevant information

  • Master

    • Showing ability to integrate knowledge and master complexity and do judgements based upon insufficient information


Ability to communicate

Ability to communicate

  • Bachelor

    • Describe information, ideas, problem and solutions

  • Master

    • Describe the conclusions and the knowledge they are based upon (to some extent) for both specialists and ordinary people


Study skill

Study skill

  • Bachelor

    • Being able to continue the studies with a high degree of independence

  • Master

    • Being able to continue the studies almost independent


Grading

Grading

  • The ECTS grading can be easily mapped to Bloom’s taxonomy in combination with the Dublin core descriptors

  • However, there is no easy way for mechanical translation from other grading systems

  • By providing a detailed description of grading criteria, the process could be easier to carry out

  • The grade is a qualitative measure, based upon the judgement of the teacher


Grading scale

Grading scale

  • A=Excellent

  • B=Very good

  • --------------------------------------

  • C=Good

  • D=Acceptable

  • E=Just acceptable

  • --------------------------------------

  • FX = Barely failed

  • F=Failed

The excellent performance

The good performance

The not so very good performance


The grading procedure 1

The grading procedure 1

  • The examinee should demonstrate his or her knowledge about and skill in using the concepts, methods and data which belong to the course.

  • The examinee should put forward his or her knowledge and motivate why it is brought forward in the actual context.

  • The knowledge is shown by the collection of concepts, methods and data

  • The understanding of the examininee is shown by the evaluation of the chosen set of concepts, methods and data.


The grading procedure 2

The grading procedure 2

  • The evaluation is done by describing the relation between concepts, methods and data, different kind of generalisations all seen from a critical point of view.

  • The examinee uses his or her knowledge to demonstrate how the actual concepts, methods and data can be used to solve a problem of known type.

  • The demonstration is valued according to the complexity of the problem

  • If possible, the examninee can also demonstrate how problems of unknown type can be solved with the actual concepts, methods and data


The excellent performance

The excellent performance

  • The examinee has a very exhaustive knowledge about concepts, methods and data

  • The examinee describes these including almost every relevant circumstances

  • The examinee gives an almost total motivation for using these concepts, methods and data

  • The examinee relates, combines and generalises concepts, methods and data in a very confident and talented way

  • The examinee uses his/her knowledge for solving known problems in a very talented way and may eventually also demonstrate solving of unknown problems


The good performance

The good performance

  • The examinee has an exhaustive knowledge about concepts, methods and data

  • The examinee describes these including many relevant circumstances

  • The examinee gives an acceptable motivation for using these concepts, methods and data

  • The examinee relates, combines and generalises concepts, methods and data in a sufficiently confident way

  • The examinee uses his/her knowledge for solving known problems in an acceptable way


The not so very good performance

The not so very good performance

  • The examinee has knowledge about some concepts, methods and data, but they are too few

  • The examinee describes these including only few relevant circumstances

  • The examinee gives not an acceptable motivation for using these concepts, methods and data

  • The examinee relates, combines and generalises concepts, methods and data in an uacceptable way

  • The examinee uses his/her knowledge for solving known problems in an unacceptable way


Unit of analysis1

Bloom & Dublin

Curriculum

UNIT OF ANALYSIS

COURSE

CONTENT

GOAL

WORKLOAD

CONTEXT


Workload

Workload

  • Can be interpreted in different ways:

    • Number of full-time weeks the student in average (?) needs for passing the course with acceptable grading

    • Number of contacthours per week for the student

    • Amount of work needed during the whole semester

  • The ECTS, points, credit points etc. is a quantitative measure

  • There are intrinsic measurement procedures to carry out


Context

Context

  • Is the most important type of the attributes

  • Affects all of the other and provides a base for understanding

  • The Weltanschauung is an important part of the context


Formalisation

Formalisation

  • at least to some degree


Translation

Translation

  • Content

    • Agree on some curriculum

    • Provide an exhaustive description

  • Which leveL

    • Apply Dublin descriptors

  • How many ECTS (volume, size, workload)?

    • This is described on the following slides

  • Context, Weltanschauung

    • This must be known. Also discussed

  • Let us start with the volume


For vxu

For VXU

  • <Attribute name: Volume> <Meas. value: 5 >

  • <Meas. unit: points>

  • <Meas. procedure: one week, 40 h=1 point >

  • <Time: Autumn of 2006>

  • < Weltanschauung: Student work >


For fh

For FH

  • <Attribute name: Volume> <Meas. value: 6 >

  • <Meas. unit: ECTS>

  • <Meas. procedure: unknown >

  • <Time: Autumn of 2006>

  • < Weltanschauung: Qualification units >


For kbtut

For KBTUT

  • <Attribute name: Volume> <Meas. value: 2 >

  • <Meas. unit: credit points>

  • <Meas. procedure: X credit points * (15*2)>

  • <Time: Autumn of 2006>

  • < Weltanschauung: Study time divided in 600 credit points>


For ects

For ECTS

  • <Attribute name: Volume> <Meas. value: 5 >

  • <Meas. unit: ECTS credits>

  • <Meas. procedure: Learning Units (content*workload)>

  • <Time: Autumn of 2006>

  • <Weltanschauung: Study time for receiving the qualification>


Conceptual graph vxu

Conceptual graph VXU

Define

Course Component

Objective

Instance of

Type of Component

Extent

Lecture

Lab work

Examination

Study hours


Conceptual graph fh

Conceptual graph FH

Define

Qualifications/

learning goals

Knowledge unit

Instance of

Knowledge Component

Extent

Lecture

Instance of

Lab work

Examination

Study hours

Complexity


Conceptual graph kbtut

Conceptual graph KBTUT

Define

Purpose/goal

Discipline

600 credit point system

Instance of

Knowledge Component

Extent

Lecture

Study hours

Lab work

Examination


Conceptual graph ects

Conceptual graph ECTS

Descide

Learning goal

Content

Divided in

Is realised through

Qualifications

Acuiring methods

Lecture

Lab work

Examination


Simple mapping

Simple mapping

SWE

ECTS

Course

Course

Name

Name

x 1,5

Volume

Volume

Goal

Goal

etc

etc


Correct mapping

Correct mapping

ECTS

SWE

Course

Learning Unit

Course

M

Name

Name

Content

M

1

M

Volume

ECTS

Volume

1

Goal

Goal

1

etc

etc


Finito

Finito


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