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Language Arts. 1/15/14. Opening. Review DO & IO worksheet . Opening. Review What questions do Direct Objects answer? What type of verbs are they always used with? What is an Indirect Object? What must be present in order to have an IO in a sentence? . Opening. Transitive Verb:

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Language arts

Language Arts

1/15/14


Opening

Opening

  • Review DO & IO worksheet


Opening1

Opening

Review

  • What questions do Direct Objects answer?

  • What type of verbs are they always used with?

  • What is an Indirect Object?

  • What must be present in order to have an IO in a sentence?


Opening2

Opening

  • Transitive Verb:

    • An action verb that has a direct object.

    • It transfers the action to an object.

      Ex. Scriptwriters set the pace of their movies.

      Ex. An earthquake shook San Francisco.


Opening3

Opening

  • Transitive Verb:

    • An action verb that has a direct object.

    • It transfers the action to an object.

      Ex. Scriptwritersset the pace of their movies.

      Ex. An earthquakeshookSan Francisco.


Opening4

Opening

  • Intransitive Verb:

    • An action verb that does not have a direct object.

    • It does not need an object to complete its meaning.

      Ex. The action moves quickly.

      Ex. Rosie was shopping.


Opening5

Opening

  • Intransitive Verb:

    • An action verb that does not have a direct object.

    • It does not need an object to complete its meaning.

      Ex. The actionmoves quickly.

      Ex. Rosiewas shopping.


Opening6

Opening

  • Sometimes an intransitive verb is followed by a word that looks like a direct object, but is really an adverb. Remember, an adverb tells where, when, how, or to what extent; a direct object answers the question whom or what.

  • Sometimes verbs can be transitive or intransitive – always look for the object!

    • Ex. She reads my note versus She reads aloud.

    • Ex. Albert ate an apple versus Albert ate already.


Opening7

Opening

  • Review

    • What is a Transitive Verb?

    • What is an Intransitive Verb?


Opening8

Opening

  • Transitive & Intransitive Verbs Worksheet

    • Underline the subject once and verb twice for all.

    • If the action verb is TRANSITIVE, write T and label the DO and IO (if there is one).

    • If the action verb is INTRANSITIVE, write I.


Opening9

Opening

WriteSource p. 729

  • The wolf snarled fearsomely.

  • The coach gave the player a penalty for poor sportsmanship.

  • The leaves on this bush are purple.

  • Near the end of the race, Taylor ran faster than ever before.

  • Jorge has been transferred to Jackson Park Middle School.

  • Casey told the truth when he said he didn’t do it.

  • I read a letter to the editor about the rising energy costs.

  • Ted worked quietly.


Opening10

Opening

WriteSource p. 729

  • The sound of the fire alarm blasted through the halls.

  • Eva plays the drums in a band that she and her friends put together.

  • Before eating his breakfast, Najee took a vitamin.

  • Have you ever seen a telephone with a dial?

  • The sky seems a little green this afternoon.

  • The maintenance staff cleans the pool once a week.

  • The housekeeping staff cleans regularly.


Opening11

Opening

  • Verbals:

    • A word that is formed from a verb and acts as a noun, an adjective, or an adverb.

    • Three kinds of verbals: gerunds, participles, and infinitives.

  • WriteSource p. 730


Opening12

Opening

  • Gerunds

    • A gerund is a verb form that ends in –ing and is used as a noun.

    • A gerund often begins a gerund phrase

    • Gerund phrases can be subjects, predicate nouns, direct objects, indirect objects, or objects of prepositions.


Opening13

Opening

  • Gerunds

    • Ex. Worrying is useless.

    • Ex. You should stop worrying about so many things.

    • Ex. Eating healthy is important.

    • You should stop eating junk food if you want to be healthy.


Opening14

Opening

  • Gerunds

    • Ex. Worryingis useless. (gerund = subject)

    • Ex. Youshould stopworrying about so many things. (gerund = direct object)

    • Ex. Eating healthy is important. (gerund = subject)

    • Youshould stopeating junk food if you want to be healthy. (gerund = direct object)


Opening15

Opening

  • Gerunds


Opening16

Opening

  • Participle

    • A participle is a verb form ending in –ing or –ed.

    • A participle is used as an adjective and often begins a participial phrase.

    • Participles can modify nouns and pronouns.

    • Ex. A tired hikerwoke a sleeping bear.

    • Ex. The terrified traveler wanted to run.


Opening17

Opening

  • Participle

    • A participle is a verb form ending in –ing or –ed.

    • A participle is used as an adjective and often begins a participial phrase.

    • Participles can modify nouns and pronouns.

    • Ex. A tired hikerwoke a sleeping bear.

    • Ex. The terrified traveler wanted to run.


Opening18

Opening

  • Infinitive

    • An infinitive is a verb form introduced by “to”

    • It may be used as a noun, an adjective, or an adverb.

    • Think: “To infinity and beyond!”

    • Ex. Sam’s dog runs to distract the bulls.

    • Ex. Ringo the cat liked to nap indoors every morning.


Opening19

Opening

  • How can you tell the difference between an infinitive and a prepositional phrase that begins with to?

    • If a verb follows “to”, it is an infinitive phrase.

    • If a noun or pronoun follows “to”, the words are a prepositional phrase.

  • WriteSource p. 731 #1-10


Work time

Work Time

  • Complete Identifying Verbals worksheet.


Closing

Closing

  • Review DO & IO worksheet


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