Presentation to the portfolio committee on home affairs 27 january 2009
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Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs 27 January 2009. Contents. Annual Report 2007 / 2008 Financial Statements 2007 / 2008 Preparations for the 2009 national and provincial elections Voter registration. Annual Report 2007 / 2008. Vision and Mission. Vision

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Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs 27 January 2009

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Presentation to the portfolio committee on home affairs 27 january 2009

Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs27 January 2009


Contents

Contents

  • Annual Report 2007 / 2008

  • Financial Statements 2007 / 2008

  • Preparations for the 2009 national and provincial elections

  • Voter registration


Annual report 2007 2008

Annual Report 2007 / 2008


Vision and mission

Vision and Mission

Vision

  • To strengthen constitutional democracy through the delivery of free and fair elections in which every voter is able to record his or her informed choice.

    Mission

  • The Electoral Commission is a permanent body created by the Constitution to promote and safeguard democracy in South Africa. Although publicly funded and accountable to Parliament, the Commission is independent of the government. Its immediate task is the impartial management of free and fair elections at all levels of government.


Legislative mandate

Legislative Mandate

  • In terms of Section 190 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act 108 of 1996), the Electoral Commission must

    a.manage elections of national, provincial and municipal legislative bodies in accordance with national legislation;

    b.ensure that those elections are free and fair; and

  • declare the results of those elections within a period that must be prescribed by national legislation and that is as short as reasonably possible.

  • The duties and functions of the Electoral Commission are defined in section 5 of the Electoral Commission Act, 1996. These include to

    a.compile and maintain a voters' roll by means of a system of registering eligible voters by utilising data available from government sources and information furnished by voters;


Legislative mandate cont

Legislative Mandate (cont.)

  • compile and maintain a register of parties;

  • undertake and promote research into electoral matters;

    d.develop and promote the development of electoral expertise and technology in all spheres of government;

    e.continuously review electoral legislation and proposed electoral legislation, and to make recommendations in connection therewith;

    f.promote voter education;

    g.declare the results of elections for national, provincial and municipal legislative bodies within seven days after such elections; and

    h.appoint appropriate public administrations in any sphere of government to conduct elections when necessary.


Strategic objectives

Strategic Objectives

1Entrenching the Commission as a focal point for the delivery of free and fair elections in the most efficient and cost effective manner

2Maintaining an optimal network of voting districts and voting stations for elections to ensure reasonable access by voters and to maintain an accurate and up-to-date national common voters roll

3Informing civil society with a view to maximising citizen participation in democracy and electoral processes, and to manage elections

4Enabling and promoting the effective participation of political parties and independent ward candidates in electoral processes


Strategic objectives cont

Strategic Objectives (cont.)

5Maintaining and consolidating organisational systems and infrastructure for efficient delivery of elections

6Developing and maintaining effective business processes in respect of financial management, information and communication technology, corporate services, legal services, and communication in order to ensure the effective functioning of the Commission

7Offering continuous structured training to officials to facilitate the effective functioning of the organisation, including a fluent and effective electoral process

8Positioning the human capital within the organisation for effective delivery of elections and making the Commission the employer of choice


Strategic objective 1

Strategic objective 1:

  • Entrenching the Commission as a focal point for the delivery of free and fair elections in the most efficient and cost effective manner

    The Commission is involved in ongoing liaison with other Chapter 9 institutions.

    We exceeded our target for liaisons with other EMBs and observed 4 elections on the African continent alone, in line with our target.


Strategic objective 1 cont

Strategic objective 1 (cont.):

  • Celebrations to mark 10th anniversary of establishment of IEC (in July 1997)

  • Liaisons with other Chapter 9 institutions ongoing

  • Elections conducted throughout country for more than 60 other institutions


Elections for other institutions

Elections for other institutions


Elections for other institutions cont

Elections for other institutions (cont.)


Elections for other institutions cont1

Elections for other institutions (cont.)


Elections for other institutions cont2

Elections for other institutions (cont.)


Strategic objective 1 cont1

Strategic objective 1 (cont.):

  • International Liaison

    • Participation in activities of International IDEA, AU, and SADC ECF

    • Liaisons with other Election Management Bodies

    • Technical assistance to the Comoros, Nigeria, and the DRC

    • Observer missions: Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Seychelles, East Timor, Australia, the Gambia

    • Hosted delegations from Malaysia, Malawi, the Gambia, Nepal, Maldives, Tanzania, Sudan, Ghana


Strategic objective 2

Strategic objective 2:

  • Maintaining an optimal network of voting districts and voting stations for elections to ensure reasonable access by voters and to maintain an accurate and up-to-date national common voters’ roll

    The Commission recorded 20 291 743 registered voters on the voters’ roll, which was below the target for the period. The decrease in the number of voter registrations was mainly due to deaths. The voter registration campaigns ahead of the 2009 elections will result in more increases to the voters’ roll.


Strategic objective 2 cont

Strategic objective 2 (cont):

  • Voters’ roll compiled in terms of the Electoral Act (1998)

  • Continuous voter registration at MEO offices

  • Targeted communication and registration

  • Verification against the National Population Register


Registration statistics

Registration statistics


Voter registration by municipality

Voter registration by municipality


Strategic objective 3

Strategic objective 3:

  • Informing civil society with a view to maximising citizen participation in democracy and electoral processes, and to manage elections

    The Commission continued to implement its electoral democracy interventions in 550 schools throughout the country. In addition, a number of other civic education interventions have ensured that South Africa has an electorate with a high level of awareness.

    Participation in by-elections vary between 10.6% and 47.6%, but the percentage of spoilt ballots remain low (at 1.07%), demonstrating that we have a well-informed electorate.


Civic education initiatives

Civic education initiatives


Civic education initiatives cont

Civic education initiatives (cont.)


Civic education initiatives cont1

Civic education initiatives (cont.)


Strategic objective 3 cont

Strategic objective 3 (cont.):

  • Celebrations on national days: Freedom Day, Youth Day, Women’s Day and Heritage Day

  • Multi-stakeholder conference: 8 – 10 October 2007

  • SRC colloquium: 1 – 4 April 2007

  • Provincial civic education initiatives

  • Schools project implemented in 550 schools


By elections

By-elections

  • 65 by-elections held

  • Vacancies occurred mainly due to deaths (35) and resignations (18)

  • Highest number of by-elections in KZN (19), Mpumalanga (12), and Western Cape (11)

  • Voter turnout varied between 10.6% and 47.6%

  • Spoilt ballots: 1.07%


By elections statistics per province

By-elections statistics per province


Strategic objective 4

Strategic objective 4:

  • Enabling and promoting the effective participation of political parties and independent ward candidates in electoral processes

    While no general elections were held in the period under review, the Commission continued to convene party liaison committees at national, provincial and municipal levels. In preparation for the 2009 elections, the number of PLC meetings will increase.


Strategic objective 4 cont

Strategic objective 4 (cont.):

  • Party Liaison Committees: 6 at national level, 50 at provincial level; and 808 at municipal level

  • 146 parties registered: 101 at national level and 56 at local level

  • 215 PR vacancies were filled; mostly due to death (54) and resignations (77)


Party liaison committee meetings

Party Liaison Committee meetings


Floor crossing

Floor crossing

  • Responsible for administering floor crossing at municipal level

  • 249 municipal councillors crossed the floor

  • Highest number of floor crossings was in KwaZulu-Natal (28), Western Cape (21), and Eastern Cape (15)

  • 30 applicants for floor crossing were unsuccessful


Strategic objective 5

Strategic objective 5:

  • Maintaining and consolidating organisational systems and infrastructure for efficient delivery of elections

    The number of voting stations remained stable in the period under review. Leading up to the 2009 elections, the Commission plans to increase the number of voting stations, to increase the number of schools used as voting stations, and to decrease the number of mobile and temporary voting stations.


Strategic objective 5 cont

Strategic objective 5 (cont.):

  • 18 873 voting stations across the country for reporting period

  • 65.6% of voting stations are located in schools

  • Of 17 859 permanent voting stations, 20.7% do not have electricity, 8.5% do not have toilets, and 12.2% do not have water

  • 932 temporary voting stations and 82 mobile voting stations


Strategic objective 6

Strategic objective 6:

  • Developing and maintaining effective business processes in respect of financial management, information and communication technology, corporate services, legal services, and communication in order to ensure the effective functioning of the Commission

    The Commission again obtained an unqualified audit report.

    We exceeded our target with respect to the number of public information drives.

    A stable and consistent IT infrastructure was maintained at national, provincial and local IEC offices.


Strategic objective 6 cont

Strategic objective 6 (cont.):

  • 379 contracts awarded of which 253 (totalling R45.1 million) went to BEE companies

  • Of eProcurement auctions, 95.5% were awarded to BEE companies

  • 15 (3.96%) contracts were awarded to non-SMMEs totalling 1.76% of actual value of all contracts awarded


Financial management

Financial Management

  • Ensured that the financial management system promoted the objectives of the PFMA and Treasury Regulations

  • Improved financial management systems to ensure that they are integrated, fast and user friendly

  • Obtained an unqualified report from the Auditor General


Information and communication technology

Information and communication technology


Information and communication technology cont

Information and communication technology (cont.)

  • Stable and consistent infrastructure at national office, nine provincial offices and 237 municipal offices

  • Updating standard policies and procedures

  • Replaced financial applications with SAP

  • Procuring 30 000 new PBSU units (zip-zips)


Corporate and legal services

Corporate and legal services

  • 7 accidents involving IEC vehicles

  • 4 incidents of burglary or theft occurred at IEC sites

  • More than 150 SLAs were concluded with various service providers


Communication

Communication

  • Campaigns at selected audiences such as the youth

  • Radio adverts in all 11 languages

  • Print adverts

  • Publications: 3 million general registration pamphlets and 3 million pamphlets on registration for use in schools were printed

  • Go Green campaign

  • “Take a Girl Child to Work” day


Strategic objective 7

Strategic objective 7:

  • Offering continuous structured training to officials to facilitate the effective functioning of the organisation, including a fluent and effective electoral process

    The Commission continued to ensure that electoral staff were recruited and adequately trained for all election events, such as by-elections and elections for other organisations. In addition, 98 training and development interventions in the form of bursaries for further study, short courses, etc. were provided for permanent staff of the Commission to ensure that they attain the necessary skills and knowledge.


Strategic objective 7 cont

Strategic objective 7 (cont.):

  • 1 620 election officials trained

  • National Training Workshops (May and October 2007) compiled a comprehensive training blueprint and training manuals

  • International IDEA hosted BRIDGE courses in collaboration with IEC in May and November 2007, and March 2008


Strategic objective 8

Strategic objective 8:

  • Positioning the human capital within the organisation for effective delivery of elections and making the Commission the employer of choice

    The Commission continued to fill vacancies with the aim of ensuring that the organisation would be at full strength for the 2009 elections. 75.9% of posts were filled in the period under review.


Strategic objective 8 cont

Strategic objective 8 (cont.):

  • Total staff provision of 805 posts

  • 75.9% of posts were filled

  • New Employment Equity Plan adopted in March 2008

  • IEC promotes HIV and AIDS awareness in the workplace


Employment equity status

Employment equity status


Employment equity status cont

Employment equity status (cont.)


Labour relations

Labour relations

  • Collective agreement entered into with NEHAWU

  • Disciplinary action taken against 16 employees for alleged offences relating to financial misconduct, misconduct and fraud

  • Disciplinary action resulted in one final written warning and 12 dismissals

  • Fraudulent matters were reported to SAPS and criminal charges were instituted

  • 6 cases of alleged unfair dismissal were referred to the CCMA of which all were awarded in favour of the IEC


Financial statements 2007 2008

Financial Statements 2007 / 2008


Preparation of financial statements

Preparation of financial statements

  • The Annual financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Statements of Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (GAAP) with the prescribed Standards of GRAP which replace the equivalent Standards of GAAP.

  • Recognition and measurement principles in GAAP and GRAP do not result in material differences, it is only the terminology that changed.

  • Financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis.


Funds received and spent

Funds received and spent

  • The Commission received R485 250 million from the Department of Home Affairs;

  • The Commission recognised an amount of R1.3m as income received from the Department of Foreign Affairs for foreign assistance from the R10.671 million recognised as a liability in 2007 financial year, leaving the reported liability as R9.363 million in 2008 financial year.

  • Sundry income of R27,848 million, consisting largely of interest earned, was generated bringing the total income to R514,406 million;

  • All the funds have been accounted for and disclosed in the financial statements.


Presentation to the portfolio committee on home affairs 27 january 2009

Actual Expenditure vs Budget

Summary : Economic Classification Report for the year ended 31 March 2008


Presentation to the portfolio committee on home affairs 27 january 2009

Detailed Income and Expenditure Statement

for the year ended 31 March 2008


Presentation to the portfolio committee on home affairs 27 january 2009

Detailed Income and Expenditure Statement

for the year ended 31 March 2008


Audit report

Audit Report

  • The Electoral Commission received an unqualified audit report for the 2008 financial year, with an emphasis of matter on non-compliance with 2 Treasury regulations.

  • TR15.12.3. We made cheque payments for amounts exceeding R2 000 to the value of R515 790 without obtaining National Treasury approval.

  • TR17.3.1. We acquired a computerised finance and administration system prior to obtaining National Treasury approval. Expenditure incurred in 2008 financial year is R15 698 237.


Emphasis of matter

Emphasis of matter

  • The cheques in questions were mostly for small amounts to previously unemployed casual workers that did not have bank accounts and for the replenishment of petty cash provisions. No losses were suffered.

  • The practice of issuing cheque payments for amounts exceeding R2 000 is being eliminated during the current financial year. Currently our financial system has been set to not be able to print a cheque for an amount in excess of R2 000. There will thus be no cheque amounts exceeding R2 000 in the Auditor-General’s report for the 2010 financial year.

  • The Commission is still in discussion with the National Treasury with regard to the acquisition of the new computerised financial and administrative system. It is hoped that the matter will be resolved by 31 March 2009. It must be added that the Treasury in 1998 approved that the IEC do not use the same system as applies in government departments


Other matters

Other matters

11. All efforts are being made to pay suppliers within 30 days from the date of receipt of the invoices. This has been problematic with the introduction of a new computerised financial and administrative system at the same time as preparing for elections (with which we, however, had no choice since the previous system are no longer supported and the providing company withdrew from South Africa). With a specific focus on the subject good progress is, however, being made

12. Efforts are made to perform bank reconciliations on a daily basis. This is, however, a near impossible task since the IEC operates nearly 260 bank accounts for its national, provincial and municipal offices. Treasury were thus approached on 24 July for an exemption to limit reconciliations to one a month

13. Tenders awarded in excess of R200 000 are now reported to the National Treasury every month.


Other matters cont

Other matters (cont.)

14. Goods or services procured in excess of R1million by means other than competitive bids are now reported to the National Treasury and the Auditor-General.

15. Efforts are made to ensure that the financial statements submitted for audit are not subject to any material amendments resulting from the audit.

22. The strategic plan for 2008/09 does include time frames or targets for the Commissions programmes for performance indicators as required by Treasury Regulation 5.2.3(d).


Preparations for 2009 elections

Preparations for 2009 Elections


Progress to date

Progress to date

  • 1994: 10 000 voting stations, no voters’ roll

  • 1999: 14 650 VDs, 18,1m reg voters (ave 1 240 reg voters a VD)

  • 2000: 14 988 VDs, 18,4m reg voters (1 233)

  • 2004: 16 966 VDs, 20,6m reg voters (1 219)

  • 2006: 18 873 VDs, 21m reg voters (1 116)

  • 2009: 19 726 VDs, 21,6m reg voters


Voter registration

Voter Registration

  • Continuous voter registration at IEC local offices until the proclamation of the elections

  • Special targeted registration initiatives in the first week of December

  • Voter registration weekend on 8 & 9 November 2008 – all 19 713 voting stations opened

  • Second registration weekend on 7 & 8 February 2009


Requirements to participate in elections

Requirements to participate in elections

  • Party registration is ongoing process

  • A party that wants to register must submit the following to the Chief Electoral Officer:

    • Prescribed application form

    • The name and abbreviated name of the party

    • A Copy of the party’s Constitution

    • Deed of Foundation signed by 500 registered voters who support the founding of the party

    • Two sets of party logo/symbol in colour

    • R500 registration fee


Requirements to participate in elections cont

Requirements to participate in elections (cont.)

  • The registration of political parties is governed by the Electoral Commission Act of 1996 read with the Regulations for the Registration of Political Parties

  • Any person can lodge an objection with the Chief Electoral Officer against the registration of a party

  • The Chief Electoral Officer may also refuse to register a party if amongst others, the name, the abbreviated name or the symbol of a party resemble that of another party to the extent that it may confuse or deceive voters

  • Appeal against the decision of the Chief Electoral Officer lies with the Commission


Requirements to contest an election

Requirements to contest an election

  • For National and Provincial Elections South Africa uses the Proportional Representation System

  • 150 parties currently registered (111 at national level and 39 at provincial levels)

  • For a party to contest an election, it must

    • Be a registered party

    • Submit list of candidates by the date stated in the election timetable

    • Pay an election deposit of R540 000

      • R180 000 for National Assembly

      • R40 000 for a Provincial Legislature


Requirements to contest an election cont

Requirements to contest an election (cont.)

  • All these requirements must be fulfilled at the date and time stipulated in the Election time- table

  • Failure to do so will result in the disqualification of a party from contesting an election

  • In 2004, 37 of 75 registered political parties contested the elections; of these 21 contested the national elections

  • Of these only 12 gained seats in parliament and provincial legislatures


Outreach activities

Outreach activities

  • Official launch of 2009 elections took place on 17 September 2008.

  • National Youth Summit held on 30 October – attended by more than 500

  • Civic and voter education conducted through fieldworkers and CSOs ( in some provinces a hybrid model is used)

  • Ongoing stakeholder interventions: PLCs, Traditional leaders, Faith-based Org, Youth, Women, Business, Trade unions, people with Disabilities, and Farming communities (interventions to date: more than 220 000)

  • Communication campaign conducted via print and electronic media

  • Campaigns supported by:

    • public call centre toll-free telephone number (0800 11 8000)

    • Web site (www.elections.org.za)

    • SMS facility (32810)


Outreach activities1

Outreach activities

  • Targeted interventions for high intensity voter and ballot education for the disability sector (Blind and Deaf) using field workers, TOT sessions with organizations for the disabled

  • Edutainment and community / street theatre

  • Use of community Radio, comic books and drama

  • SABC programming on voter education from Jan 2009 until election time


Measures to enhance transparency of elections

Measures to enhance transparency of elections

  • Recruitment and Training of electoral staff and party agents

    • New criteria for the appointment of election officials (presiding and deputy presiding officers, in particular) include:

      • Presiding (and deputy presiding) officers must not in the last five years have held political office or been a candidate in an election or have been politically active for a political party

      • must not in the last five years have held office in an organisation that has party political affiliations or aims.

    • Party Liaison Committees (PLCs) consulted on choice of registration officials before contracts with registration staff were concluded. Same will apply to election staff


Measures to enhance transparency of elections cont

Measures to enhance transparency of elections (cont.)

  • Approx. 200 000 election officials for the elections

  • Training programme being rolled out and close to 200 000 officials will be trained before voting day

  • New zip-zip equipment (hand held scanners)

    • Old fleet replaced with 30 000 new units

    • Used to register voters on voter registration weekend but also…

    • Increased capacity to have entire voters’ roll loaded, allowing each voting station to verify eligibility to vote of any person arriving at the voting station

  • Security material, e.g., finger marking ink


  • Measures to enhance transparency of elections cont1

    Measures to enhance transparency of elections (cont.)

    • Results auditors

      • Independent certified auditors will audit results captured on the results system to ensure that results captured are the same as those on the original results slip

    • Scanning of results slips

      • Will allow captured results to be verified against source document

      • Scanning will take place in every municipality and scanned copies of results slips will be available electronically


    Election material and logistics

    Election material and logistics

    • Information technology upgrades aimed at improving IT support

    • SMS facility: allows voters to check voter registration information

    • Public website: allows voters to check registration status on-line

    • Public call centre: toll-free number

    • Processes to procure election material underway

      • Ballot boxes

      • Ballot papers


    Results process

    Results Process

    • Counting process

      • Counting takes place at voting stations in the presence of party agents and observers

      • Results slips record results and are completed by counting officers and signed by party agents

      • Copy of results is displayed at the voting station

      • Original results slip is taken in tamper-proof envelope to municipal electoral office accompanied by security

      • The envelop is opened in the presence of observers

      • Results slip is scanned


    Results process cont

    Results process (cont.)

    • Information on results slips is captured twice on results system after verification by results auditors

    • The result will then be transmitted via satellite to the result centre

    • In the event there is an anomaly in the result of a particular voting station, then system will flag the result and the anomaly will be investigated and resolved before the result is posted on the leader board at the result center

    • Each political party contesting an election is provided with a computer at the result centre so that they can follow the results capturing and processing

    • Political parties and the media will be educated on the results, counting and recording processes to ensure transparency and to minimise suspicions


    Results process cont1

    Results process (cont.)

    • Results Operations Centres will allow stakeholders opportunity to monitor incoming results in an open and transparent manner

    • Any interested party can lodge an objection material to the determination of the result to the Commission not later than the second day after voting day

    • The Commission will investigate and make a decision on the objection

    • The appeal against the decision of the Commission lies with the Electoral Court

    • The IEC is obliged to declare results of an election within 7 days


    Voter registration1

    Voter Registration


    Preparations

    Preparations

    • Replaced technology (PBSUs) used to register voters

    • Target of 22 million registered voters for 2009 Elections

    • Voter registration gap mainly among the youth

    • Schools and tertiary education institutions to be targeted


    Registration weekend surpassed expectations

    Registration Weekend surpassed expectations

    • 8 & 9 November from 08:00 to 17:00

    • 3.6 million South Africans visited 19 713 registration stations

      • 1 648 189 new registrations

      • 1 752 596 re-registrations in different VDs

      • 293 871 re-registrations in same VDs

    • 77.9% of new registrations were in youth category


    Voters roll comparison

    Voters’ roll comparison


    What s in the numbers as at 12 november 2008

    What’s in the Numbers?(as at 12 November 2008)


    Gender breakdown

    Gender Breakdown


    Breakdown by age groups

    Breakdown by Age Groups


    Breakdown by age group 12 november 2008

    Breakdown by age group (12 November 2008)


    Voter registration2

    Voter registration…

    • Registration and voting in South Africa are not compulsory.

    • Registered voters can de-register – this choice is provided for, in law.

    • Present voter registration methods are quick, secure and transparent. Potential voters and parties like them.

    • HSRC survey (2005) suggested that 82% of persons interested in registering, are registered.


    State of the voters roll after registration weekend

    State of the voters’ roll after registration weekend


    Thank you

    Thank you


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